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Thread: Soccer/Football

  1. #751

    Re: Soccer/Football

    Quote Originally Posted by Ti-Amie View Post
    This was nothing less than murder.
    More like suicide given that some of the perpetrators died as well.
    Roger forever

  2. #752

    Re: Soccer/Football

    This story broke yesterday but I guess the deleted Tweets made it incomprehensible to me.

    Samir Nasri: Sevilla midfielder 'under investigation for possible anti-doping violation' after IV drip
    A series of explicit and swiftly-deleted tweets from Nasri's account has triggered an investigation into a possible anti-doping violation

    Jack Pitt-Brooke, Jack de Menezes


    Samir Nasri was pictured attending the 'Drip Doctors' clinic where he had an IV drip Twitter/@DripDoctors

    Samir Nasri is facing an anti-doping investigation after it was revealed that he received an IV drip at an American clinic last week.

    The Manchester City midfielder, on loan to Sevilla, was said by the ‘Drip Doctors’ clinic in Los Angeles to have been given an ‘Immunity Drip’, which includes one litre of hydration fluid. The World Anti-Doping Agency (WAda) only allows intravenous infusions of up to 50 millilitres unless there is a clear medical reason, such as a hospital admission, or if the athlete has a Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE).

    The Spanish anti-doping agency (AEPSAD) have opened an investigation into Nasri and his use of the IV drip, according to Spanish newspaper El Pais. Sevilla are said to be surprised by the allegations, and will ask Nasri for an explanation when he returns to Spain on Thursday after spending the winter break in the United States.

    Nasri’s use of the clinic came to light on Tuesday evening when the ‘Drip Doctors’ account tweeted about Nasri’s attendance, which led to a series of explicit and swiftly-deleted tweets from Nasri’s account. Nasri later explained that he was hacked.

    We provided @SamNasri19 a concierge Immunity IV Drip to keep him hydrated & in top health during his busy soccer season with @SevillaFC ���� pic.twitter.com/bfDNeM5vQu
    — Drip Doctors (@DripDoctors) December 27, 2016

    The picture caught the attention of Richard Ings, a former Australian Sports Anti-Doping Agency [Asasa] officer, who sent it on to Wada and the AEPSAD, adding the comment “which should be of great interest”.

    Which should be of great interest to @wada_ama and @AEPSAD#IV>50mlbanned https://t.co/cetyltqRvO
    — Richard Ings (@ringsau) December 27, 2016

    The Independent has attempted to contact Nasri’s representatives and the World Anti-Doping Agency, but is yet to receive a response.

    http://www.independent.co.uk/sport/f...-a7499106.html
    "For the person that we know in the daytime, we don't need to light a lamp to see his face at night." Ghanaian Proverb


  3. #753
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    Re: Soccer/Football

    Only in LA would there be a concierge IV delivery 'hydration' clinic.

    Here's a little more to the story in regard to his 'explicit' tweets:

    https://www.thesun.co.uk/sport/24909...n-los-angeles/


    (in related news, Tatiana Golovin really dodged a bullet).


  4. #754

    Re: Soccer/Football

    U.S. Travel Restrictions Would Damage 2026 World Cup Bid, UEFA President Says
    By RORY SMITH FEB. 27, 2017

    NYON, Switzerland — The United States’ hopes of hosting the World Cup in 2026 will be damaged, perhaps critically, if President Trump’s travel restrictions come into full force, Europe’s top soccer official said.

    Aleksander Ceferin, installed last year as president of UEFA, the sport’s governing body in Europe, said measures that might prevent players, fans or journalists from attending the event would count against any bid. The United States is a clear favorite to be awarded the 2026 tournament, either on its own or as part of a joint North American bid with Mexico and Canada.

    But in an interview at UEFA’s headquarters last week, Mr. Ceferin said immigration policy would be among the areas considered during the evaluation of a United States bid, and he suggested that it would “not help” if Mr. Trump succeeded in placing harsher restrictions on travel to the United States from certain countries in the near term. Though Mr. Trump’s initial 90-day ban on immigration and travel from seven Muslim-majority countries was overturned by a federal court, he has vowed to introduce a second executive order that could limit travel from those nations, at least temporarily.

    “It will be part of the evaluation, and I am sure it will not help the United States to get the World Cup,” Mr. Ceferin said. “If players cannot come because of political decisions, or populist decisions, then the World Cup cannot be played there. It is true for the United States, but also for all the other countries that would like to organize a World Cup.

    “It is the same for the fans, and the journalists, of course. It is the World Cup. They should be able to attend the event, whatever their nationality is. But let’s hope that it does not happen.”

    (...)

    U.S. Soccer declined to comment on Mr. Ceferin’s remarks on Sunday. Though it has not publicly confirmed its intention to bid for the tournament, the federation has expressed confidence that it would receive all the governmental guarantees needed to meet FIFA’s criteria for admitting visiting players and fans, and that no ban — temporary or otherwise — would be in place for the tournament. FIFA’s rules do not dictate that any potential hosts have entirely open borders.

    (...)

    Mr. Ceferin also acknowledged that more stringent immigration policies could harm Britain’s chances of hosting major finals once that country exits the European Union. The Champions League final will have been held in Britain three times in the last nine years — twice at Wembley Stadium in London and this June at Millennium Stadium in Cardiff, Wales — and the semifinals and final of the 2020 European Championship are set for London.

    “If ‘Brexit’ happens, everything changes,” Mr. Ceferin said. “But football was played before, and it will be played in the future. Now, with free movement in the European Union, it is much better.”

    (...)

    Mr. Ceferin said he had no problem if England wanted to withhold visas from “a severe criminal.”

    “But if we see that players cannot enter because they have any sort of procedure ongoing, then we will simply think if we should play our European matches there,” he said. “Neymar and Lionel Messi both have procedures going on. This year, the Champions League final is in Cardiff. Imagine if they did not let them in. That is a big thing for us, if players from England can travel anywhere but players from other teams cannot travel to England. With free movement in Europe, it is much better.

    “Even in 2020, if ‘Brexit’ has happened, then it can be a big problem for fans. That stays firm, and we will speak to the British government, and I am sure the English Football Association will help us.”


    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/27/s...uefa.html?_r=0
    "For the person that we know in the daytime, we don't need to light a lamp to see his face at night." Ghanaian Proverb


  5. #755

    Re: Soccer/Football

    Manchester United won the EFL Cup yesterday

  6. #756

    Re: Soccer/Football

    The USMNT lost to Trinidad & Tobago and will not participate in the next World Cup. Predictably, chaos has ensued.

    The USMNT Got Exactly What It Deserved
    Billy Haisley

    So here we are. After a shambolic qualifying campaign full of perceived nadirs, false dawns, and nearly constant disappointment, the USMNT has finished behind Mexico and Costa Rica and Panama and Honduras in the hexagonal table. The U.S. fell to Trinidad & Tobago last night, and will not compete in the 2018 World Cup. With the players the U.S. has, and the size of the country, and the money it pours into the sport, and the alleged determination of those in charge for the USMNT to take the leap into the soccer elite, and CONCACAF’s comically easy qualifying setup, this is a shock of historic proportions. There is no justification for this being so stunning, though, and that is precisely the problem.

    In retrospect, no one should’ve expected anything other than what happened down in Couva, Trinidad last night. The USMNT played the same tentative, passionless, uninspired, plodding game they have time and again in this qualifying cycle, and Trinidad & Tobago punished them just as Mexico and Costa Rica and Panama and Honduras had before. Once again Christian Pulisic demonstrated his enormous talent and stratospheric potential, which once again only made the contrast in ability between him and every single one of his vastly inferior teammates that much starker. No honest, clear-eyed follower of this team could credibly argue that the U.S. are anything other than a poorly managed bunch made up of Pulisic, maybe one or two other players who aren’t completely worthless on the high-level international stage, and a whole lot of hardworking but untalented scrubs—a group uniquely prone to gagging against a team playing to the U.S.’s many weaknesses, even or maybe even especially when they could least afford to do so.

    And yet the loss was still legitimately stunning. Not because it was impossibly unforeseeable that the likes of Jozy Altidore and Jorge Villafaña and Omar Gonzalez might play poorly in a big spot; or that the U.S. would confront a deep defense turtled up in its own half for the umpteenth time and show the same puzzlement in regards to how to break it down as if it were the first time they’d encountered one; or that playing with a single true central midfielder might not work out too well. No, what was shocking was the realization that things actually were exactly as bad as they’d seemed for so long, that the institutional rot truly had set in so deep that even the world’s easiest World Cup qualification process couldn’t bail the team out, that the United States of America is so staggeringly incompetent that they couldn’t even bungle their way into a draw against the absolute nobodies of Trinidad & Tobago. Literally everything was set up for the USMNT to at the very least stumble into a playoff spot, and yet they still found a way to blow this once in a lifetime chance.

    There’s no way to overstate how horrendous it is that the U.S. couldn’t qualify for the World Cup. It is disgusting. It is ridiculous. It is humiliating. It is enraging. It is the lowest moment in this country’s history in the sport. It would be hilarious if it weren’t so heartbreakingly disappointing. The only reaction that comes close to capturing what it viscerally felt like to witness this debacle was Taylor Twellman’s postgame rant last night on ESPN:

    (Video at the link)

    Everyone has to go after this, and everything associated with soccer in America has to change. If, in that literally and metaphorically massive head of his, Bruce Arena had any room amidst all the self-regard for a modicum self-respect, he would’ve resigned on the spot last night. Sunil Gulati should tender his resignation by dinner time tonight, but since we all know that’s not going to happen, he must lose his seat as U.S. Soccer president in next February’s election. The next coach cannot be an America. At minimum, players on the current roster like Besler, Gonzalez, Tim Howard, Clint Dempsey, DaMarcus Beasley, Graham Zusi, Nick Rimando, and Chris Wondolowski should never again pull on another USA shirt in a meaningful game.

    No longer can MLS get away with touting its tediously incremental growth strategy—that to this day has borne almost no fruit—as evidence that the quality of play and players America produces is capable of stocking the player pool with talents befitting the status the country aspires to. No longer should fans treat the decision of good American players to run away from the challenges and pressures of Europe in exchange for a highly paid vacation back in the American league as some good or even neutral thing. No longer can fans who behave first and foremost as cheerleaders, happily parroting the bullshit fed to them by the proponents of the status quo, pretend they are not part of the problem. No longer should the media that covers the USMNT and the greater American soccer scene treat everyone from the players to the leagues to the entire sport’s framework with blinkered support and faith, sparing them from criticism due to their supposedly good intentions. Everything that has culminated in the USMNT’s failure to qualify is wrong, and if anyone is serious about making sure it never happens again and that America realizes its latent potential, the changes must be drastic and immediate.

    We should not kid ourselves here; this is an unmitigated disaster. It’s true that even if the USMNT had gone through, they almost certainly wouldn’t have done anything of note in Russia next summer. (International soccer has long been a game favoring steely defenses and powerful, organized, creative midfields adept at sealing off access to their own penalty area while chiseling their way into their opponent’s. No line of the USMNT’s roster is particularly strong, but the defense and midfield are especially weak.) Still, having the U.S. compete in the World Cup is about so much more than wins and losses.

    Soccer is far more prominent now in America than it ever has been, but it still takes the U.S. competing in big headliner events like the World Cup to capture a large share of the public’s attention. This attention is vital to ensuring the game’s continued growth. An enormous chunk of that invaluable attention evaporated last night, and there’s no way to reclaim it other than to wait five more years until the next edition of the tournament. An entire generation of young kids who might’ve seen a potential Wonderteen hat trick in a group stage match now will never discover a passion for the game. They will never dream of becoming the next Pulisic, obsessively queueing up Youtube compilations of Messi and Neymar and Isco, spending countless hours out in the backyard trying to mimic those moves, honing the skills necessary to maybe make their dream a reality. Iconic moments—think Landon Donovan against Algeria or Tim Howard against Belgium in the most recent cycles—are the critical inflection points that create new fans and new players. The absence of them will certainly set the sport back.

    Even outside of the broader concerns about how to maximize the chances that the U.S. produces a Messi or Ronaldo or even a Harry Kane in the next decade or so, having the U.S. in the World Cup is just flat out fun. There’s nothing like dipping out of work early to head to a nearby bar and tilt a couple back alongside a communal throng of newly converted diehard fans of the Red, White, and Blue. As we said earlier today, the USMNT is in a unique position to unify the country. Everyone getting behind the team in a World Cup year is one of the best experiences sports has to offer. Now we won’t have it.

    That is all to say that there is nothing good about the U.S. missing out on the World Cup, and there is a whole hell of a lot that’s bad. There does, however, remain the possibility that this epic embarrassment could cause the soccer culture in America to change in important ways that could prevent something like this from happening again. Of course it’s probably even more likely that Gulati and his ilk will successfully focus attention away from the bigger picture flaws that have directly contributed to the USMNT’s current standing and, like Arena said last night, convince most people that “There’s nothing wrong with what we’re doing ... Nothing has to change.”

    In order to prevent that from happening, everyone has to truly, sincerely accept that what happened last night and throughout qualifying isn’t good enough, and that it will take some serious changes to the way things are done in order to get better. It won’t be easy, as there are just as many obstacles that make the USMNT gig uniquely challenging as there are reasons to believe it could also become one of the most coveted jobs in the international game, but we can’t resign ourselves to a continuation of our current fate. The USMNT, U.S. Soccer, the soccer media, and fans all deserved to see the team knocked out of the World Cup this time. We don’t deserve to see it happen again.

    https://deadspin.com/the-usmnt-got-e...ium=socialflow
    "For the person that we know in the daytime, we don't need to light a lamp to see his face at night." Ghanaian Proverb


  7. #757
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    Re: Soccer/Football

    This is quite unfortunate since USMNT at World Cup has fueled a lot of soccer fandom growth in the US.

    Side story - Based on reliable sources, pretty much everything to do with pro soccer in the US is as messed up as FIFA all over the globe (maybe not constant embezzlement bad, but overall, not a well-run sport).


  8. #758

    Re: Soccer/Football

    While I agree with mmmm8 that soccer fandom in the US has grown due to the visibility of the men's team, and also because of the far superior success over the years of the women's program, this sport is still not nearly at the level of national pride like it is in almost every country south of here in the Western Hemisphere (and in many other parts of the world). So I am not overly upset that our men's team didn't make it. The presence of their national teams at the World Cup will be a huge source of pride for the people of Mexico, Costa Rica, and Panama (and Honduras if they get through a play-off game), and will likely do those countries more good than getting the US team in would have done here.

    GH

  9. #759

    Re: Soccer/Football

    USA out. And so is Argentina. Not good for FIFA (how will they make their corrupt deals without major teams?)
    Starry starry night

  10. #760

    Re: Soccer/Football

    Argentina is IN. The Dutch are out
    25 GRAND SLAM TITLES: 5 SINGLES 13 DOUBLES 7 MIXED

  11. #761
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    Re: Soccer/Football

    Awww, the Dutch are are the country I usually cheer for (NO idea why, just always have.)

  12. #762
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    Re: Soccer/Football

    Quote Originally Posted by ptmcmahon View Post
    Awww, the Dutch are are the country I usually cheer for (NO idea why, just always have.)
    They've pretty much disintegrated since the last WC.


  13. #763

    Re: Soccer/Football

    Quote Originally Posted by the Moz View Post
    Argentina is IN. The Dutch are out
    My soccer frenzied friends told me Argie was out. Thanks for the correction.
    Starry starry night

  14. #764

    Re: Soccer/Football

    Although they came in third, they only managed that in the last match with serious chances of not qualifying. They even started the match losing under a minute.
    Meet again we do, old foe...

  15. #765
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    Re: Soccer/Football

    Apparently an Indonesian goalkeeper died after a collision with a teammate during a match. They believe he sustained a head injury that led to a cardiac arrest. Horrible.

    http://centurylink.net/news/read/art...nesian_leag-ap
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