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  1. #2266
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    Re: The Music Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Ti-Amie View Post
    You either liked or hated Gaga's Bowie tribut at the Grammy's. Lorde performed one at the British Music Awards. They're going out of their way to say Bowie's son Duncan Jones approved her. I dunno. I don't like it. She sounds like she's at the bottom of a barrel. Do sound engineers hate everyone?

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/pe...-a6895436.html

    The band and Annie Lennox (is that her on the mic/guitar early on?) in the beginning sound awful too. Maybe it's the recording.

    Lorde does seem to be trying way too hard here, though.


  2. #2267
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    Re: The Music Thread

    I just now finally watched the Lady Gaga tribute from the Grammys.

    Beautiful and well-produced, but empty.


  3. #2268
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    Re: The Music Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by mmmm8 View Post
    Beautiful and well-produced, but empty.
    aka "The Grammys"

    edit: ok, ok, they've had some nice moments in the past. But few and far between.

  4. #2269

    Re: The Music Thread

    The Magic Shop, Where Music and History Were Recorded, Is Closing
    Mar 11, 2016 · by John Schaefer

    There was a time when Manhattan was the center of the music recording world. Artists great and small booked time – often huge blocks of time – in recording studios to make their next albums. But the digital revolution decimated record companies’ bottom lines, and at the same time put recording technology in the hands of anyone with a laptop, and the studios began to disappear. The Record Plant and the Hit Factory are gone, and on Wednesday, March 16, the Magic Shop will close too. The Magic Shop was founded in 1988 by Steve Rosenthal, in the unlikely neighborhood of Soho – a seedy, at times dangerous area in those days before gentrification. The list of clients who recorded there includes Lou Reed, the Ramones, Norah Jones (who came out of the music scene at the club called The Living Room, which Rosenthal also owned, and which closed in December), Suzanne Vega, Coldplay, and David Bowie. Bowie made his final two albums at the Magic Shop, relying on the staff’s abilities to both get the sound right and to keep everything a secret.

    Steve Rosenthal offered us a guided tour of the Magic Shop’s two floors: the ground floor where all those records were made, and the basement level where Rosenthal’s archiving and remastering work has brought the music of Elvis Presley, Errol Garner, the early Stones, and the archives of The Bottom Line to a new generation of listeners.

    http://www.wnyc.org/story/magic-shop...6376cc1ff8f361
    Three things cannot be long hidden: the sun, the moon, and the truth (paraphrased)


  5. #2270

    Re: The Music Thread

    the new single from the 1975 is aces!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FSnAllHtG70
    Last edited by the Moz; 04-03-2016 at 05:42 AM.

  6. #2271
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    Re: The Music Thread

    What year is it, 1973? That song Gwen Stefani just played on SNL was the most boring, paint-by-numbers thing since, what, something by Tony Orlando and Dawn?

  7. #2272

    Re: The Music Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Martini4me View Post
    What year is it, 1973? That song Gwen Stefani just played on SNL was the most boring, paint-by-numbers thing since, what, something by Tony Orlando and Dawn?
    Was it this song?



    If so, the video was shot live so it's sort of interesting. For example, when she's standing at the piano, someone underneath is putting skates on her. And during the skating sequence, she's replaced by a stunt double before a pivotal moment.
    Towel avatar power, do your thing!

  8. #2273
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    Become a Kiva lender and help people lift themselves out of poverty. To find loans that are safe, secular, and mostly short in term, go to the A+ Convenience Store at http://starfish.dynalias.org/starred...venience-store. Or, if you would like to support repeat borrowers with a proven track record of repayment, check out CraigsList at http://starfish.dynalias.org/starred/craigslist. Happy lending!

  9. #2274

    Re: The Music Thread

    Happy Caturday, y'all... Moshow gives his cat a bath

  10. #2275

    Re: The Music Thread

    Bruuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuce!

    bruced.PNG

  11. #2276

    Re: The Music Thread

    thank you David Lynch for introducing me to the Chromatics

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CjQ2jGUNSck
    25 GRAND SLAM TITLES: 5 SINGLES 13 DOUBLES 7 MIXED

  12. #2277

    Re: The Music Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by the Moz View Post
    thank you David Lynch for introducing me to the Chromatics

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CjQ2jGUNSck
    Yes! And also the Cactus Blossoms
    I don't deny myself bread. I have bread every day.

  13. #2278

    Re: The Music Thread

    Loving the Beth Ditto solo album...probably my favorite so far of the year (a toss up between this and Migos)

    Beth Ditto - Fire
    I don't deny myself bread. I have bread every day.

  14. #2279

    Re: The Music Thread

    For those who never saw Tom Petty perform someone on my Twitter TL mentioned this video. Amazing work by all the musicians (and Prince almost fell off the stage). You'll also have no trouble recognizing George Harrison's son Dhani.

    Three things cannot be long hidden: the sun, the moon, and the truth (paraphrased)


  15. #2280
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    Re: The Music Thread

    This will be only be interesting to fans of The The, but since Matt Johnson so seldom is heard from, I thought it worth posting. Soul Mining is my favorite album of all time, so I'm not exactly objective.

    That sense of urgency
    The The’s Matt Johnson talks to Michael Hann about fame, family and a long-awaited comeback
    -FT

    Pity poor Bruno Brookes. It was summer 1989, and the mulletted DJ was on duty presenting BBC1’s Thursday night chart extravaganza Top of the Pops. The The were making their first live appearance on the show, performing “The Beat(en) Generation”. “Our youth, oh youth, are being seduced/ By the greedy hands of politics and half-truths,” sang Matt Johnson over guitar arpeggios from Johnny Marr, late of The Smiths. Come the chorus, Johnson suggested the titular generation had been “reared on a diet of prejudice and misinformation”. At the end of the song, the cameras cut to Brookes, who reacted the only way possible for a man constitutionally conditioned to insane public cheerfulness: “Fabbo!”

    Twenty-eight years later, in the east London building that is his base, Johnson contrasts his grim-faced public image with the person he felt himself to be. His persona as pop’s harbinger of doom “was a useful device for me. The [press] were attacking a person who didn’t exist, so I didn’t take it personally.”

    Johnson is 56 now, and The The have been more or less silent for 17 years. There have been three low-profile film soundtracks, but no new album of songs since NakedSelf in 2000. He was consumed by inertia, which itself has somehow led him into what he allows is a comeback. First up is a frankly peculiar triple-album set, Radio Cinéola: Trilogy: one disc of other people performing Johnson’s songs, along with Johnson singing a new The The song, another of Johnson reading an edit of John Tottenham’s poem “The Inertia Variations”, and a third of interviews and soundscapes from Johnson’s Radio Cinéola broadcasts. Then there is a documentary, The Inertia Variations — partly about Radio Cinéola, partly about Johnson’s absence, and his family.

    Next year he returns to the stage for the first time since performing at David Bowie’s Meltdown in 2002: three big London shows sold out in minutes. There will be new songs, he says, and there will be a proper new The The album at some point.

    The silence was precipitated by the sudden death of his younger brother, Eugene, in 1989. Although Johnson continued to work, it was a perpetual struggle. “It was almost like a slow-motion collapse,” he says. The comeback was spurred by the death of his older brother, Andrew, early last year. “Andrew and I were incredibly close; he was probably the biggest influence on me creatively. Suddenly, having that gone from my life, it stimulated that sense of urgency. I did a lot of soul-searching. I’ve got to get back to what I love doing. I feel in a way as if someone’s turned on the oxygen supply again. I feel energised and excited.”

    Johnson was the prodigy of British independent music, emerging from the London post-punk scene in his late teens. By the age of 20 he’d released his first album; by 22 he’d recorded his first masterpiece — the love song “Uncertain Smile” — but his mid-twenties saw him adopt his longstanding Cassandra guise. The The’s albums Infected and Mind Bomb were state-of-the-nation addresses in which cheer was nowhere to be found, though it was the more personal — but equally bleak — Dusk that became his biggest hit, reaching number two in 1993. It’s perhaps as well that Bruno Brookes never had to announce the 1986 single “Heartland” on Top of the Pops: “This is the place where pensioners are raped/ And the hearts are being cut from the welfare state.”

    Was he surprised he became a pop star — one way off at the side, but a pop star nevertheless? “My first band was when I was 11, and that was the dream. At that age, a young working-class kid would dream of being a footballer, a pop star or an actor. I knew from the age of five I was going to be a singer. As a 13-year-old playing village halls and people’s garages in the glam rock era, that really appealed to me. The idea of girls and cars and money was a teenage fantasy.”

    He grew up above a pub in London’s East End, where he’d hear music from the jukebox and the bands below, and he and Andrew would obsess over The White Album, and Bowie, and T Rex. But once he started making music, the girls and cars and money became less important. Instead he became restless: no The The album sounds like the one before. “One phrase that’s been used is making all the wrong career choices for all the right reasons,” he says. “I would have been a hell of a lot more successful if I’d done things in a more conventional way, but I don’t regret anything. I was very uncomfortable about becoming too famous. I like having an ordinary life, and being fairly anonymous. It’s healthier for your spirit, your soul, your ego, but it’s also more useful as a songwriter to be an anonymous observer.”

    That life above the pub has been one of the things that has guided his absence from pop — that and everyday life with a growing family. Johnson has become a dedicated conservationist, a leading campaigner against overdevelopment on the fringes of the City of London. He’s furious about council collusion with developers, and the more he talks, the more you hear the Johnson of Infected and Mind Bomb: he doesn’t trust mainstream media, he seems sympathetic to Putin’s Russia. He complains, too, about political correctness: “None of us want to go back to the era of personal abuse and racism, but if you have a society that is walking on eggshells all the time, terrified of saying anything, then I think things have become pretty boring.” I’m too boggled to point out that the most powerful politician in the world spends his whole time being deliberately politically incorrect, that social media is awash with misogyny and racism.

    And yet, he says, despite the lyrics he writes, “I’ve got a lot of faith in human nature. I’m quite an optimistic person.” What he believes in, he says, is treasuring life’s miniature pleasures. “A simple acknowledgment of the good things in life. Personally, I’ve been able to live in the moment more. Back then there was a hedonistic whirlwind, and a greediness that wasn’t just drink and drugs and sex.”

    The other day, he took his little boy to the zoo. They came face to face with a great grey owl that had been rejected by its mother. “It just sat with me, looking at me, for what must have been 10 minutes. It was one of the most beautiful things I’ve felt in ages. I’m dismayed at world affairs, but little moments like that are surprisingly refreshing and reassuring about nature and this innate intelligence that is surrounding us all times.”

    He pauses. “It sounds a bit corny.” Perhaps, yes. “But I don’t like being put in a box.”

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