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Thread: The MLB Thread

  1. #2056
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    Re: The MLB Thread

    I predict Greinke gets hit tonight. Not bombed, but will give up too many runs.

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  2. #2057
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    Re: The MLB Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by shtexas View Post
    I predict Greinke gets hit tonight. Not bombed, but will give up too many runs.

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    Or not

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  3. #2058
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    Re: The MLB Thread

    He's been way better than I anticipated.

    This ump is making me wish there was Hawkeye.

  4. #2059

    Re: The MLB Thread

    Jesse Dougherty
    @dougherty_jesse

    Max Scherzer was in so much pain this morning that his wife had to help him get dressed. That’s what would keep him out of a World Series start.
    There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life.”

    ― Frank Zappa





  5. #2060

    Re: The MLB Thread

    Nationals owners don’t want to sit with Trump for World Series Game 5: report
    Published 4 mins ago on October 27, 2019By Sarah K. Burris

    A source has told local Washington, D.C. news that the owners of the Washington Nationals wanted nothing to do with President Donald Trump, who is attending Game 5 of the World Series Sunday evening.

    WUSA9 reported that the Lerner family, who owns the Nationals, asked Major League Baseball not to put them in any position to deal with Trump during the game.

    “Sunday night at Nationals Park, the last home game of this glorious postseason, it’s back to taking sides. It’s back to….political baseball,” WUSA said.

    A representative of the family said that there was not a request from the president to be seated with the family of the owners, but it was clear they didn’t want to be put in the position to deny the president.

    Trump will sit with MLB officials, WUSA reported.

    There were already issues with the president attending the game. Trump was never asked to throw out the first pitch of the game, as former President Barack Obama did twice in his presidency. But Trump tweeted last week that he wouldn’t do it because he would look “too heavy.” Instead, one of his greatest foes, Chef José Andrés will be throwing out the first ball.

    Andrés worked to help feed furloughed federal workers when Trump shut down the government for the longest stretch in history. After Trump abandoned Puerto Rico after the American island was hit by two hurricanes, Andrés arrived with supplies and food to help. He then rushed to the Bahamas after another hurricane devastated the island.

    Andrés also has a complicated history with Trump, who wanted to have the chef run his restaurant at the Trump Hotel on Pennsylvania Ave. in Washington. After Trump went after immigrants, Andrés withdrew from the deal.

    You can read the full report at WUSA.

    https://www.rawstory.com/2019/10/nat...game-5-report/
    There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life.”

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  6. #2061
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    Re: The MLB Thread

    I bet he did not want to throw the first pitch because HE CAN'T THROW.
    That simple. Wimp.
    Missing winter...

  7. #2062

    Re: The MLB Thread

    Sean Doolittle on declining White House invite: ‘I don’t want to hang out with somebody who talks like that’


    Sean Doolittle decided to decline an invitation to the Washington Nationals' World Series celebration at the White House on Monday. (Toni L. Sandys/The Washington Post)

    By Jesse Dougherty November 1, 2019 at 9:10 p.m. EDT

    Ever since Sean Doolittle was traded to the Washington Nationals in the summer of 2017, the reliever was often asked whether he would visit the White House after winning the World Series.

    He pondered but never answered. He thought it would be hollow to respond — like discussing a hypothetical lottery win — because the Nationals fell short in his first season and didn’t make the playoffs the next year. But then the Nationals became World Series champions when they beat the Houston Astros on Wednesday. Then Doolittle, long known for his liberal opinions and willingness to share them, had a real decision to make.

    Doolittle chose to not attend a White House ceremony slated for Monday. He is the first Nationals player to publicly confirm that, although multiple people close to the team said a handful of players are wrestling with the decision. He explained his reasons in a lengthy interview with The Washington Post on Friday night. It starts with not compromising his beliefs and an aversion to President Donald Trump’s actions, despite wanting to celebrate with teammates as much as possible.

    “There’s a lot of things, policies that I disagree with, but at the end of the day, it has more to do with the divisive rhetoric and the enabling of conspiracy theories and widening the divide in this country. My wife and I stand for inclusion and acceptance, and we’ve done work with refugees, people that come from, you know, the ‘shithole countries,' ” Doolittle said, mimicking when Trump referred to Haiti, El Salvador and African nations as “shithole countries” in a January 2018 meeting.

    “At the end of the day, as much as I wanted to be there with my teammates and share that experience with my teammates, I can’t do it,” Doolittle continued. “I just can’t do it.”

    After the World Series victory, Doolittle was surprised that he was having trouble with the decision. He knew, almost right away, that he didn’t want to go. But he also considered how little time these Nationals have left together. They have the parade through Washington on Saturday, then the White House visit, and then everyone will leave for their offseason homes. A handful of players will exit in free agency, and new faces will come in. They’ll next convene for reunions down the line.

    But that ultimately didn’t change Doolittle’s feelings about Trump and his administration. Doolittle also noted Friday that he did not want to be a distraction for teammates who wanted to go for the experience of meeting the president. He added that they respected his decision, and he respects theirs all the same. “I feel very strongly about his issues on race relations,” Doolittle said, and he listed the Fair Housing Act, the Central Park Five and Trump’s comments following a white supremacist rally in 2017. He also mentioned that his wife, Eireann Dolan, has two mothers who are very involved in the LGBTQ community.

    “I want to show support for them. I think that’s an important part of allyship, and I don’t want to turn my back on them,” Doolittle said. “I have a brother-in-law who has autism, and [Trump] is a guy that mocked a disabled reporter. How would I explain that to him that I hung out with somebody who mocked the way that he talked, or the way that he moves his hands? I can’t get past that stuff.”

    Before publicizing his decision, Doolittle looked up how Braden Holtby and Chris Long discussed their choice to not attend championship ceremonies at the White House. Holtby, whom Doolittle called “the real saves leader in D.C.," did not go to the White House when the Washington Capitals won the Stanley Cup in 2018. Long chose not to when the Philadelphia Eagles won the Super Bowl in 2018, but the Eagles were later uninvited by Trump because many players expressed that they did not want to visit.

    Doolittle deleted Twitter from his iPhone until the Nationals won the World Series. But now that he has the app back and his decision is out there, he already has seen people telling him to respect the office of the president. He views that as the default answer from those who believe athletes should attend White House ceremonies no matter what. And he has a succinct response.

    “People say you should go because it’s about respecting the office of the president,” Doolittle said. “And I think over the course of his time in office he’s done a lot of things that maybe don’t respect the office.”

    “The rhetoric, time and time again, has enabled those kind of behaviors,” Doolittle continued, referring to racism and white supremacy. “That never really went away, but it feels like now people with those beliefs, they maybe feel a little bit more empowered. They feel like they have a path, maybe. I don’t want to hang out with somebody who talks like that.”

    Instead, once the weekend is over and the car is packed, Doolittle and Dolan will drive Monday afternoon to Williamsburg, Va., to see his grandfather. Then they will begin their trek home to Chicago, where they bought a house last winter, and enjoy the downtime after an eight-month season. Doolittle hopes his teammates enjoy the White House visit, and he said that genuinely; he just didn’t feel that he could take part.

    “I don’t want to get mad online, as they say,” he said. “I want people to know that I put thought into this and, at the end of the day, I just can’t go.”


    https://www.washingtonpost.com/sport...lks-like-that/
    There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life.”

    ― Frank Zappa





  8. #2063

    Re: The MLB Thread



    Nationals embraced by Trump at White House, where they can’t escape politics
    By
    David Nakamura and
    Jesse Dougherty
    November 4, 2019 at 4:32 p.m. EST

    President Trump literally embraced the Washington Nationals on Monday five days after their World Series title, wrapping catcher Kurt Suzuki in a bear hug during a joyful ceremony on the South Lawn — but one that included notes of political commentary.

    Suzuki received the president’s affection when he took the lectern on the South Portico of the White House at Trump’s invitation and donned a red “Make America Great Again” hat, raising his arms as the president hugged him from behind. The moment came before a crowd of more than 1,000 on a sunny fall afternoon and punctuated an unlikely season for a team that took a seven-game series over the Houston Astros last week. It was also perhaps a measure of vindication for a president who was booed by the home crowd at Nationals Park when he attended Game 5.

    But even as most of the players joined Trump, several thanking him for the invitation, seven of the 25 players on the active World Series roster were absent, most of them minorities. Relief pitcher Sean Doolittle, who is white, had declared publicly last week that he would opt out over objections to Trump’s rhetoric and policies. All-star third baseman Anthony Rendon, outfielders Victor Robles and Michael A. Taylor and pitchers Joe Ross, Javy Guerra and Wander Suero were among the other Nationals who were not present.

    A team spokeswoman declined to provide context for why specific players did not attend, and no players, coaches or front office members were available for interviews following the ceremony.

    Their absence appeared to mark the latest example of the highly politicized nature of such sports ceremonies during Trump’s tenure. Several teams have declined to visit the White House, and others, including the 2018 World Series-winning Boston Red Sox, have been sharply divided, with most of the minority players opting out during a ceremony in the spring.

    Trump was upbeat in praising the Nationals, calling the crowd of players’ families and White House staffers a record for South Lawn ceremonies. He marveled that “Baby Shark,” the preschooler ditty that became the unofficial team anthem, was a “very powerful little tune” — and a military band played a live version as the players led the crowd in mimicking a shark chomp with their hands.

    “America fell in love with Nats baseball. That’s all they wanted to talk about,” Trump said, before adding after a beat: “That and impeachment. I like Nats baseball much more.”

    The remark drew a laugh from the crowd.

    Trump did not allude to Doolittle or other players who were absent. As he recited some of the heroic moments of the Nationals’ World Series run, Trump invited players, including Suzuki, pitchers Max Scherzer, Stephen Strasburg and Patrick Corbin, first baseman Ryan Zimmerman and outfielder Juan Soto to the lectern to make remarks.

    In his remarks, Zimmerman, who presented Trump with a Nationals jersey bearing his name and the No. 45, praised Trump’s leadership. He called the visit an “unbelievable honor” and said the team would “like to thank you for keeping everyone here safe in our country, and continuing to make America the greatest country to live in in the world.”

    The Nationals did not discuss the decision to attend with players, according to two people with knowledge of the situation. Players were only asked whether they planned to attend or not.

    Tres Barrera, Raudy Read, Roenis Elías and Wilmer Difo, who are all on the Nationals’ 40-man roster but were not active for the World Series, also were not in attendance.

    Several of the players who skipped the event are from Latin American countries. Robles, Difo and Read were born in the Dominican Republic; Elías was born in Cuba; Rendon, Guerra and Barrera are all Mexican American; and Taylor and Ross are both African American.

    Guerra said he was not there because he and his fiancee, Allison, are preparing for their wedding in Mexico this coming weekend. A person close to Robles said the 22-year-old outfielder already had travel booked to return home Sunday.

    There were a handful of players wrestling with the decision to attend or not in recent days, and some did skip the visit for political reasons. Others felt their status — or lack of status — made it so they had to attend with their teammates. Three players felt that the quick turnaround made it hard for players to decline the invitation without making a political statement, people close to the players said.

    Team owner Mark Lerner, General Manager Mike Rizzo and Manager Dave Martinez were in attendance, and Rizzo and Martinez made brief remarks.

    Rizzo called the Nats’ campaign, during which they rebounded from a 19-31 start, a “miracle season and an unforgettable postseason.” He said the team “unified a region when the region needed unifying the most. Bumpy roads lead to beautiful places and this here is a beautiful place.” Trump and first lady Melania Trump applauded.

    The players exhibited some of the loose, carefree spirit that defined their season. Infielder Howie Kendrick stepped to the lectern to pretend he was going to speak before Trump came out, drawing chants of “How-ie!” from the crowd. After Strasburg spoke, the crowd chanted “four more years!” — a reference to their hopes that the pitcher, now a free agent, re-signs with the team.

    “I’m going to consider that four more World Series titles,” Trump joked.

    Suzuki, who is Japanese-American, produced perhaps the most memorable image, donning the hat and raising his arms in triumph.

    Trump, who received a loud chorus of boos when he attended Game 5 of the Series at Nationals Park, beamed. “I didn’t know that was going to happen,” the president said.

    Sam Fortier and Cindy Boren contributed to this report.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/sport...e-house-visit/
    There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life.”

    ― Frank Zappa





  9. #2064
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    Re: The MLB Thread

    I'm trying to remember a time when these kinds of celebrations were as political as they are with this white house.
    Oh Grigor. You silly man.

  10. #2065
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    Re: The MLB Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Kirkus View Post
    I'm trying to remember a time when these kinds of celebrations were as political as they are with this white house.
    It's a shame it has come to this.

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