Agree Agree:  355
Likes Likes:  282
Page 65 of 65 FirstFirst ... 1540556162636465
Results 961 to 972 of 972
  1. #961

    Re: Covid19 & Tennis

    Quote Originally Posted by ponchi101 View Post
    Me personally? At least down by 40%, and that is being generous. And my serve would make Sara Errani split a gut laughing, after two weeks off.
    These people need to be on court every day. I believe i would be a major issue. And Daniil agrees.
    Yeah, if anyone missed it, Medvedev recently said that if this happens, he thinks its dangerous and sees low turnout among players. That he's planning to go right now until something happens that changes his mind. No training or playing leading into the Open would be one of those things. I know that was the plan originally, but more recent statements really hedge on those details.

  2. #962
    Been playing a long while Deuce*'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Location
    An unparallel universe
    Posts
    565

    Re: Covid19 & Tennis

    Quote Originally Posted by ponchi101 View Post
    Me personally? At least down by 40%, and that is being generous. And my serve would make Sara Errani split a gut laughing, after two weeks off.
    These people need to be on court every day. I believe i would be a major issue. And Daniil agrees.
    ^ I disagree. It's like riding a bike - you don't 'forget' how to do it and become helpless if you don't do it for a while. Assuming they've kept themselves in good physical condition over the time of the layoff (eating well, doing cardio exercizes, etc.), give them an hour on court to get the rust out, and they'll be fine. Muscle memory kicks in very quickly - especially for the pros, who have hit tons and tons of balls over the course of their lives.
    The game is 90% mental - especially at the pro level.

    For myself, I have gone out for the first time in the spring, after one full winter of not playing at all, and that first time in the spring turned out to be the best I played all summer!
    I've also gone out on the court after playing very regularly over several weeks, and played horribly.
    As I said, the game is 90% mental.
    * Yes, it's me (last seen on TW boards in 2009).

  3. #963

    Re: Covid19 & Tennis

    Golf is 90% mental. You are in the wrong forum
    Imagine telling Roger/Rafa/Nole that they will go out there and play at 95% of the capacity. Get ready to be smacked.

    Examples: Sampras Vs Jaime Izaga. A summer of not being able to train properly. And then the huge upset. To me, it is simple: if training were something that they could play well without, they would not put so much emphasis on it.
    Face it. It's the apocalypse.

  4. #964
    Been playing a long while Deuce*'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Location
    An unparallel universe
    Posts
    565

    Re: Covid19 & Tennis

    Quote Originally Posted by ponchi101 View Post
    Golf is 90% mental. You are in the wrong forum
    Imagine telling Roger/Rafa/Nole that they will go out there and play at 95% of the capacity. Get ready to be smacked.

    Examples: Sampras Vs Jaime Izaga. A summer of not being able to train properly. And then the huge upset. To me, it is simple: if training were something that they could play well without, they would not put so much emphasis on it.
    ^ I still disagree.
    Sure, one can come up with an isolated incident or two which seems to show that a player's level suffered due to lack of court time. And one could come up with isolated examples of the opposite. Neither proves a thing, of course - because it's impossible to determine the actual reason for their level of play (good or bad) in those particular matches - even the players themselves would likely have no real clue. I think that's because the real reason for one's level of play (good or bad) - especially at the pro level - is mental - and it's impossible to measure mental strength in absolutes.

    John McEnroe hated 'training' - or practicing. Instead, he played some doubles - but he was on the court hitting balls significantly less playing doubles than the amount of time players practice today. As I recall, McEnroe did pretty well...

    Of course, today, there are about 20 people on each player's 'team'. Huge overkill. They have to justify their jobs, of course...
    If a given player's level of play lowers significantly after a lengthy layoff, I'd bet that the main reason is mental - as in he/she EXPECTED their level to be significantly lower. Then it would be up to them to strengthen themselves mentally (surely there is at least one member of the exaggerated 'team' responsible for that element!). Speaking strictly physically, I don't buy it for a second.
    Last edited by Deuce*; 11-26-2020 at 10:31 PM.
    * Yes, it's me (last seen on TW boards in 2009).

  5. #965

    Re: Covid19 & Tennis

    Funny you brought up McEnroe.
    Yes, he was famous for not liking training. And then Lendl went into his training-hyperdrive. And that was when it all changed, and every player started training like Lendl because, otherwise, they had no chance.
    Remember 85? Mac reaches the USO, gets crushed by Lendl, and a while later he went into a hiatus as he was burned out. He never again reached another Slam final, (3 semis) and lost 8 times in 1R or 2R at slams, 5 of those at W and the USO.
    He was 26/27 when he took his break, and then came back.

    I guess the point is that if the players feel they need or want to train, they should be able to, regardless of our opinions. They are the ones that get to play the matches. And as much as famous train-aholics that Rafa, Nole, Roger, Thiem and many others are, some solution should be found to allow them their routine.
    Face it. It's the apocalypse.

  6. #966

    Re: Covid19 & Tennis

    There are very few men, or women, who show up on court with no muscle tone as was the case when JMac was at the top of the sport. Those who do are not usually the people you see in quarters, semis or finals at Slams, singles or doubles.

    Tennis is not going back to what it was in the 80's fitness wise. Ponchi is right. If you want the sport to be respected the athletes are going to show that they respect themselves as well. No more partying and then finding your way on court and winning as was the norm in some tennis circles back then.
    “No matter how cynical I get, I just can't keep up.” – Lily Tomlin.




  7. #967

    Re: Covid19 & Tennis

    And as Deuce and I are the oldies here :
    I remember Connors was once interviewed about training. He said that "in the past" (his early years) he could go into a slam, use the first three rounds as training and warming up, and then make it to the semis. And (when the interview took place) "now those days are gone". If he were to show up without training he would be out in 1R.
    Heck, I will use myself as an example. The level I have when I go on court after one of my working hiatus is 3.5, at best. Give me two weeks, and I am up to 4.5. Two more weeks, and some shots are at 5.0.
    I know, there is no comparison with what I can do on court and what the pros can. But if they say they need training, I will take their word.
    Face it. It's the apocalypse.

  8. #968

  9. #969
    Been playing a long while Deuce*'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Location
    An unparallel universe
    Posts
    565

    Re: Covid19 & Tennis

    I maintain that much on-court training is unnecessary for pro players to get into the rhythm of their strokes - an hour would suffice. The strokes are drilled into their brain and their muscles - and that doesn't disappear over the course of a month or two, of course.
    What you guys are talking about is fitness, which is a complete different matter. Yes, Lendl (and Navratilova) raised the acceptable standard of fitness - no argument there. And fitness is obviously important - especially in a best of 5 set Major.

    So the players need to keep in good physical shape during long layoffs - but that need not be done on the court... there are many ways of keeping fit for tennis off the court, of course. The players do not need to spend 20 hours on the court to get their strokes back after a layoff.
    * Yes, it's me (last seen on TW boards in 2009).

  10. #970

    Re: Covid19 & Tennis

    One of the things that I find the hardest to get back is the specific movement on court. I find no exercises that help me with my slide, and my footwork is something I only get back on court.
    Guess Millman and I can go out for a hit
    Face it. It's the apocalypse.

  11. #971

    Re: Covid19 & Tennis

    Quote Originally Posted by ponchi101 View Post
    And as Deuce and I are the oldies here :
    I remember Connors was once interviewed about training. He said that "in the past" (his early years) he could go into a slam, use the first three rounds as training and warming up, and then make it to the semis. And (when the interview took place) "now those days are gone". If he were to show up without training he would be out in 1R.
    Heck, I will use myself as an example. The level I have when I go on court after one of my working hiatus is 3.5, at best. Give me two weeks, and I am up to 4.5. Two more weeks, and some shots are at 5.0.
    I know, there is no comparison with what I can do on court and what the pros can. But if they say they need training, I will take their word.
    Yeah, during quarantine, several pros said "it's not like I'm going to forget how to hit a tennis ball." They weren't worried about losing their racket craft - the hitting comes back fast. It's the other stuff that takes longer. Some people can snap back into the match mentality faster than others.

    So the players need to keep in good physical shape during long layoffs - but that need not be done on the court... there are many ways of keeping fit for tennis off the court, of course. The players do not need to spend 20 hours on the court to get their strokes back after a layoff.
    Their average rally ball, for sure. But maybe to get the serve from 90 percent to 95 or 98, they need a lot of reps. And those margins matter. Plus, just the match mindset, which you can't totally replicate in practice, but it helps. Also, the big one is confidence. These are creatures of habit. Take away their normal training/preparation routine and I bet some of them will not be close to fully confident. I think that's the biggest danger.
    Last edited by MeganFernandez; Yesterday at 07:16 AM.
    Sometimes you're the windshield, sometimes you're the bug.

  12. #972
    Been playing a long while Deuce*'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Location
    An unparallel universe
    Posts
    565

    Re: Covid19 & Tennis

    Quote Originally Posted by MeganFernandez View Post
    Their average rally ball, for sure. But maybe to get the serve from 90 percent to 95 or 98, they need a lot of reps. And those margins matter.
    ^ I don't know any pros who serve 98%. Or 95%. Or even 90%.

    Quote Originally Posted by MeganFernandez View Post
    Yeah, during quarantine, several pros said "it's not like I'm going to forget how to hit a tennis ball." They weren't worried about losing their racket craft - the hitting comes back fast. It's the other stuff that takes longer. Some people can snap back into the match mentality faster than others.

    Plus, just the match mindset, which you can't totally replicate in practice, but it helps. Also, the big one is confidence. These are creatures of habit. Take away their normal training/preparation routine and I bet some of them will not be close to fully confident. I think that's the biggest danger.
    ^ I agree... which is why I said that the game is 90% mental.
    As for confidence, practice can help to destroy that just as much as it could help enhance it. I think confidence can be had without on-court workouts.
    * Yes, it's me (last seen on TW boards in 2009).

Page 65 of 65 FirstFirst ... 1540556162636465

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •