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  1. #106

    Re: Covid19 & Tennis

    Quote Originally Posted by JazzNU View Post
    The only way I see this not being the case is if China starts allowing sports competitions to slowly resume in May as is currently planned and it goes well. Can they think about hosting something there? Possibly, but there is just no way the regular planned schedule of 2020 is resuming before July.

    And I remain skeptical about resumption this year. But here's a question I haven't really seen much about for tennis - is this a sport that would consider staging events without fans?
    I'm not sure any athlete or government body has the appetite to visit China for the foreseeable future. Also remember, no one believes the Chinese numbers when it comes to the severity of the epidemic there.
    Towel Avatar, do your thing!

  2. #107

    Re: Covid19 & Tennis

    Also, with all the travel restrictions, I don't see how the athletes could get to China even if there were tournaments to play. Most players wouldn't be able to hop on a direct flight, and any connecting flights might to difficult to schedule. Maybe the top players could organize private jets, but that doesn't help most of the tours.

  3. #108

    Re: Covid19 & Tennis

    Quote Originally Posted by Miles View Post
    I'm not sure any athlete or government body has the appetite to visit China for the foreseeable future. Also remember, no one believes the Chinese numbers when it comes to the severity of the epidemic there.
    Of course. But a tennis tournament there could potentially attract Asian players, who presumably are not as skeptical of China as Westerners are. But regardless, China seems to be the first one to try sports amid the pandemic since they are clearly past their highest curve point even if they are lying about their numbers. We'll see how it plays out there. There may be other sports starting sooner, contact sports are on delay til at least May. The NBA is watching how the CBA rolls out and it's being reported on by NBA reporters so I get updates on it, that's the timetable I'm aware of there.

    Japan doesn't carry the same stigma even though there has been some thought they they may have been keeping public case numbers down because of the Olympics, so maybe they will be a place that is more successful in staging a tournament that more players are willing to attend.

  4. #109

    Re: Covid19 & Tennis

    Quote Originally Posted by JazzNU View Post
    Of course. But a tennis tournament there could potentially attract Asian players, who presumably are not as skeptical of China as Westerners are.
    Don't bet on that. Anecdotical evidence says that other Asians are more sceptical of China than Westerners not less.
    Roger forever

  5. #110

    Re: Covid19 & Tennis

    Quote Originally Posted by JazzNU View Post
    The only way I see this not being the case is if China starts allowing sports competitions to slowly resume in May as is currently planned and it goes well. Can they think about hosting something there? Possibly, but there is just no way the regular planned schedule of 2020 is resuming before July.

    And I remain skeptical about resumption this year. But here's a question I haven't really seen much about for tennis - is this a sport that would consider staging events without fans?
    Most of the events in China are played without fans so..
    “No matter how cynical I get, I just can't keep up.” – Lily Tomlin.




  6. #111

    Re: Covid19 & Tennis

    Coronavirus Presents an Existential Threat to Some Pro Tennis Events
    It is already difficult for the lowest events on the men’s and women’s tours, even in a good economy. Now, the upending of the sports calendar by the coronavirus means some tournaments may not exist next year.


    By Christopher Clarey
    Published March 31, 2020
    Updated April 1, 2020, 12:05 p.m. ET

    The moment Bob Moran received word that the professional tennis tournament he runs in Charleston, S.C., was being called off because of the coronavirus pandemic, he halted construction on the grandstands being erected just outside his office.

    “They had put the first layer in place, and then that same day they were taking it right back down again,” said Moran, the tournament director for the Volvo Car Open, a women’s clay-court event that was scheduled to begin on April 4. “Everything counts.”

    With professional tennis on hold until at least June — and perhaps much longer — the sport’s administrators and players are scrambling to cut their losses as tournaments are postponed or canceled en masse.

    Looming over those adjustments, there’s a threat — that some events, particularly those on the lower rungs of the men’s and women’s tours, will not survive.

    “This is real,” said Steve Simon, the chief executive of the WTA. “The events are taking significant hits by not operating.”

    The size of the hit for each tournament depends on numerous factors, including the timing of a postponement, the operating budget, sponsorship agreements and the agreement with the venue.

    Insurance largely will not help. Wimbledon, which is considering cancellation, is one tournament that has some coverage for a pandemic. The vast majority of tour events have none. In fact, many WTA and ATP events have skipped full cancellation insurance altogether, with annual fees that can range from $200,000 to $700,000, depending on a tournament’s revenue.

    “We have insurance against an earthquake or an act of terrorism and stuff like that, but no tournament I know of has insurance against this specific virus, so the insurance is gone,” said Edwin Weindorfer, whose company operates grass-court events in Majorca and the German cities Berlin and Stuttgart. All three events are at risk of being canceled in June.


    Without insurance relief, tournaments will have to absorb losses on their own unless the tours or national tennis federations choose to offer financial assistance.

    “The tournaments are taking tremendous hits and obviously the players will take a tremendous hit because they are not having the opportunity to compete for multiple weeks,” Simon said. “I think that’s one of the challenges everyone is working on. How do we balance the significant losses all members are taking as well as the losses the tour is going to take?”

    Gerard Tsobanian, the chief executive and president of the Madrid Open, a men’s and women’s clay-court event scheduled for May, does not believe the tours can provide broad relief. “I don’t think they have enough funds to help players and tournaments together,” he said. “No chance.”

    The losses will depend on how long the sport is widely shut down. The professional game has halted all play until June 8, when the traditional grass-court season is scheduled. But with Britain on lockdown, Wimbledon leaders are meeting this week to make a decision about the tournament scheduled for June 29 to July 12.

    “If Wimbledon would cancel, I think we will follow very fast with canceling our grass-court tournaments,” Weindorfer said.

    Because of the particularities of the playing surface, grass-court tournaments are less likely than others to be rescheduled later in the season, if and when the tour resumes regular play.

    The men’s and women’s tours have made broader contingency plans to play their seasons later in the year, packing their schedules and continuing into late December while skipping what would have been their off-seasons.

    “The players will have to create their own spacing in the calendar, but for the tournaments’ and players’ sake you have got to utilize all the weeks in the calendar that are available,” said Jim Courier, a former top-ranked men’s player.

    The French Open, the Grand Slam tournament that precedes Wimbledon, already announced that it would push its dates back to Sept. 20 to Oct. 4 from its scheduled May 24 start. The move has generated widespread anger in the sport because the French Open leaders announced their plans publicly without discussing them with others.

    The backlash could lead to more shifts for the French Open to account for other scheduled tournaments, compensatory payments to tournaments that would be disadvantaged or even to a punitive reduction in ranking points allotted to the French Open by the tours.

    The uproar is the latest demonstration of the deep divisions in tennis, a sport with multiple governing bodies and agendas. “This was a golden opportunity at a difficult time to show our small tennis community is not that fragmented and that the leaders can make a decision together and cooperate. And we ended up showing a very selfish image of who we are,” said Tsobanian, whose Madrid event was postponed with no guarantee of finding another date in 2020.

    Some in the game view the extreme situation presented by the coronavirus pandemic as an opportunity for the tours to streamline a cluttered calendar by finding ways to buy out dates from small, struggling events and focusing more on larger events that are more likely to attract top players and television viewers.

    “Maybe we have to come to chaos so a new order comes about,” Tsobanian said of the tennis calendar. “But for now, everybody is afraid.”

    Professional tennis is unusually dependent on sponsorships, a pinch felt especially by smaller tournaments.

    “We are not like football where you have 60 to 70 percent of your revenue coming from TV or media,” Weindorfer said, referring to soccer. “More like 70 percent of our income in the tennis business comes from sponsorship, at least in the lower categories, so we are much more affected by a weaker sponsorship market than most other sports.”

    The profit margins for the lowest-level men’s tour events are often slim, even during more normal socioeconomic times. The tournaments, known as ATP 250 events because of the 250 rankings points awarded to the singles champion, make up a majority of the tour — 38 of 68 events. The higher ATP tournament categories are ATP 500 and ATP Masters 1000.

    Bill Oakes, a former tournament director of the Winston-Salem Open and the chairman of the group representing the ATP 250 tournaments, said the average net profit was “about $125,000” for such events, with average operating budgets at about $4 million.

    The margins are similar at that level on the women’s tour, said Moran, who runs the women’s tournament in South Carolina.

    Oakes said profits averaged about $1.1 million for ATP 500s and $6 million for Masters 1000s.

    “The average 250 is one medium-sized sponsor from being in the red,” Oakes said. “I think every tournament needs to be very concerned about what is going to happen.”

    Any tournaments facing financial ruin could be forced to sell their ability to host an event sanctioned by the tours — tennis’s version of a franchise fee — in order to salvage some value. The sanctions, as they are called in the sport, vary widely in value depending on the week on the calendar and geography, but can be worth anywhere from about $1 million to more than $10 million for ATP 250 events. “They can make quite a bit of money when they sell their sanction to other cities, that’s kind of where the value comes as opposed to year over year cash flow,” Courier said. “They are scarce in the way real estate is scarce.”

    In 2018, 13 ATP 250 events lost money, Oakes said. That figure is likely to soar in 2020, but Oakes said that canceling an event with sufficient notice allows it to cut its losses significantly by allowing it to reduce expenditures on infrastructure, catering and security. Prize money and player appearance fees, which are permitted at lower tour levels, are also eliminated. Tournaments could also be exempt from playing their annual fees to the tour, although that is not yet certain.

    The biggest expenses that would remain are year-round staff, venue contracts and other fixed costs. Weindorfer’s three tournaments, for example, collectively spend about $600,000 annually for maintenance of the grass courts.

    Timing is a major factor for all tournaments, including the BNP Paribas Open, the prestigious men’s and women’s event in Indian Wells, Calif. It was called off on the eve of qualifying at great cost with its infrastructure and most of its staff already in place. The tournament’s leadership, which includes the billionaire Larry Ellison, declined to comment on the economic impact, but there is still hope it can be rescheduled in 2020.

    “If you are Indian Wells and Larry Ellison is your bankroll, that is a very different situation than if you are the Winston-Salem Open and you’re a 501(c),” Oakes said, referring to a nonprofit organization.

    Tournament directors at all levels, like business executives worldwide, are constantly doing math and searching for ways to limit damage.

    Pete Holtermann, the media director of the ATP 250 event in Houston that was scheduled for April, was able to cancel the printing of the tournament program.

    “In the grand scheme that was probably a small cost savings,” he said. “But you take whatever win you can get right now.”


    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/03/31/s...urnaments.html
    “No matter how cynical I get, I just can't keep up.” – Lily Tomlin.




  7. #112

    Re: Covid19 & Tennis

    Quote Originally Posted by suliso View Post
    Don't bet on that. Anecdotical evidence says that other Asians are more sceptical of China than Westerners not less.
    Agree. Asians are more skeptical of the Chinese because they interact more with them. And therefore, know them.
    I have to work with Chinese crews on a regular basis. Their top management will lie to your face routinely. No problems about that at all.
    Face it. It's the apocalypse.

  8. #113

    Re: Covid19 & Tennis


    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    April 1, 2020

    USTA Statement Regarding Wimbledon’s Cancellation



    We understand the unique circumstances facing the All England Lawn and Tennis Club and the reasoning behind the decision to cancel the 2020 Wimbledon Championships. At this time the USTA still plans to host the US Open as scheduled, and we continue to hone plans to stage the tournament. The USTA is carefully monitoring the rapidly-changing environment surrounding the Covid-19 pandemic, and is preparing for all contingencies. We also rely on the USTA’s Medical Advisory Group as well as governmental and security officials to ensure that we have the broadest understanding of this fluid situation. In all instances, all decisions made by the USTA regarding the US Open will be made with the health and well-being of our players, fans, and all others involved in the tournament.

    ###

  9. #114

    Re: Covid19 & Tennis

    ATP & WTA Announce Further Suspension Of Tours


    In conjunction with the cancellation of The Championships, Wimbledon, the ATP and WTA have jointly announced the continued suspension of the ATP and WTA Tours until July 13, 2020, due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

    In addition to Wimbledon, the suspension covers the entirety of the ATP/WTA European grass court swing, including ATP events in ‘s-Hertogenbosch, Stuttgart, London-Queen’s, Halle, Mallorca, Eastbourne, as well as WTA events in ‘s-Hertogenbosch, Nottingham, Birmingham, Berlin, Eastbourne and Bad Homburg. The suspension comes into effect at all levels of the professional game, including the ATP Challenger Tour, as well as the ITF World Tennis Tour. At this time, tournaments taking place from July 13, 2020 onwards are still planning to proceed as per the published schedule.

    The ATP and WTA realise the importance and responsibility to prioritise the health and safety of the tennis community and general public while assessing the feasibility of the Tours’ resumption.

    “Regrettably, the ongoing COVID-19 global pandemic leaves us with no choice but to suspend the Tour further; a decision we’ve made in close cooperation with our members and the other governing bodies of tennis,” said Andrea Gaudenzi, ATP Chairman. “Health and safety remains the top priority as we navigate the challenges ahead in these unprecedented times, and we will do everything we can for the Tour to resume at the earliest opportunity once it is safe to do so.”

    “This was a decision that the WTA and its members did not take lightly, however we remain vigilant in protecting the health and safety of our players, staff and fans,” said Steve Simon, WTA Chairman and CEO. “While we share in the disappointment of the season’s further postponement, our priority remains to support each other during this unprecedented time and work together as a sport in preparation of our return to play.”

    https://www.atptour.com/en/news/atp-...sion-wimbledon

  10. #115

    Re: Covid19 & Tennis


    ITF PRESS RELEASE

    1 April 2020

    ITF ANNOUNCES FURTHER SUSPENSION ACROSS ALL TOURS

    Today’s announcements by the All England Lawn Tennis Club and LTA to cancel The Championships, Wimbledon, and the UK grass court season respectively, include the cancellation of ITF’s grass court events on the ITF World Tennis Tour and UNIQLO Wheelchair Tour.

    In response to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the ITF has also suspended the ITF World Tennis Tour until 13 July 2020, aligning with the ATP and WTA’s decision to extend the suspensions of their respective tours. At present, tournaments taking place from 13 July 2020 onwards are still planning to proceed as per the published schedule.

    In addition to the suspension of the men’s and women’s ITF World Tennis Tour, the ITF will also suspend the ITF World Tennis Tour Juniors (including all ITF Junior team competitions), UNIQLO Wheelchair Tennis Tour, ITF Beach Tennis World Tour, and ITF Seniors Tour through to 13 July 2020. This includes postponement of the ITF Beach Tennis World Cup due to be played in Moscow in July.

    Three Davis Cup regional group events (in Congo, North Macedonia and Turkmenistan) and four Fed Cup by BNP Paribas regional group events (in Bolivia, Lithuania, Malaysia and Panama), scheduled to be played during the week commencing 8 June, have also been postponed. These events will be rearranged for a later date.

    The ITF will continue to review the COVID-19 situation, alongside the ATP, WTA and Grand Slam tournaments and other tennis stakeholders, with the aim of resuming ITF events as soon as it is safe to do so. Further updates will be provided in due course.

    ITF President David Haggerty said, “Protecting the health and well-being of all those involved in tennis as well as the wider public has been and remains our priority. We recognise the significant impact these decisions will have across the sport and do not take them lightly, however, we must continue to be guided by experts and evidence. Our sport is in uncharted territory, but we are committed to taking a proactive and responsible approach to meet the challenges we are facing.”

  11. #116

    Re: Covid19 & Tennis


    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    TENNIS CANADA CANCELS ALL TOURNAMENTS SCHEDULED UP UNTIL JULY 12


    Montreal, April 1, 2020 —Following the announcements made by the ATP, WTA and ITF and in accordance with the recommendations of Canadian government officials, Tennis Canada announced on Wednesday that all its tournaments scheduled to take place until July 12 have been cancelled.

    List of cancelled tournaments (in addition to the tournaments cancelled as of March 12 and 18):

    Juniors

    June 6-12 – ITF World Tennis Tour J5 Niagara – The Club at White Oaks, Niagara-on-the-Lake, ON
    June 20-26 – ITF World Tennis Tour J4 Calgary – Osten & Victor Alberta Tennis Centre, Calgary, AB
    June 27-July 3– ITF World Tennis Tour J3 Edmonton – University of Alberta Saville Centre, Edmonton, AB
    July 4-11– ITF World Tennis Tour J3 Vancouver – Stanley Park, Vancouver, BC


    Wheelchair

    June 16-19 – Janco Wheelchair Tennis Classic - Grimsby Tennis Club, Grimsby, ON
    June 21-23 – Windsor Classic – Parkside Tennis Club, Windsor, ON


    Seniors

    July 2-5 – London Hunt Club ITF Senior Championships – London Hunt Club, London, ON


    Tennis Canada continues to closely monitor the coronavirus (COVID-19) situation and remains in daily contact with the Public Health Agency of Canada and the various tennis organizations. Tennis Canada will continue to communicate any changes to all stakeholders.

    About Tennis Canada

    Founded in 1890, Tennis Canada is a non-profit, national sport association with a mission to lead the growth of tennis in Canada and a vision to become a world-leading tennis nation. We value teamwork, passion, integrity, innovation and excellence. Tennis Canada owns and operates the premier Rogers Cup presented by National Bank WTA and ATP Tour events, four professional ATP and ITF sanctioned events and financially supports four other professional tournaments in Canada. Tennis Canada operates junior national training centres/programs in Toronto, Montreal, Vancouver and Calgary. Tennis Canada is a proud member of the International Tennis Federation, the Canadian Olympic Committee and the Canadian Paralympic Committee, and serves to administer, sponsor and select the teams for Davis Cup, Fed Cup, the Olympic and Paralympic Games and all wheelchair, junior and senior national teams. Tennis Canada invests its surplus into tennis development. For more information on Tennis Canada please visit our Web site at: www.tenniscanada.com and follow us on Facebook and Twitter.


    -30-

  12. #117

    Re: Covid19 & Tennis



    NEWS RELEASE
    April 1, 2020
    WTA AND ATP ANNOUNCE FURTHER SUSPENSION OF TOURS
    In conjunction with the cancellation of The Championships, Wimbledon, the ATP and WTA have jointly announced the continued suspension of the ATP and WTA Tours until July 13, 2020, due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

    In addition to Wimbledon, the suspension covers the entirety of the ATP/WTA European grass court swing, including ATP events in ‘s-Hertogenbosch, Stuttgart, London-Queen’s, Halle, Mallorca, Eastbourne, as well as WTA events in ‘s-Hertogenbosch, Nottingham, Birmingham, Berlin, Eastbourne and Bad Homburg. The suspension comes into effect at all levels of the professional game, including the ATP Challenger Tour, as well as the ITF World Tennis Tour. At this time, tournaments taking place from July 13, 2020 onwards are still planning to proceed as per the published schedule.

    The ATP and WTA realize the importance and responsibility to prioritize the health and safety of the tennis community and general public while assessing the feasibility of the Tours' resumption.

    “This was a decision that the WTA and our members did not take lightly, however we remain vigilant in protecting the health and safety of our players, staff and fans,” said Steve Simon, WTA Chairman and CEO. “While we share in the disappointment of the season’s further postponement, our priority remains to support each other during this unprecedented time and work together as a sport in preparation of our return to play.”

    “Regrettably, the ongoing COVID-19 global pandemic leaves us with no choice but to suspend the Tour further; a decision we’ve made in close cooperation with our members and the other governing bodies of tennis,” said Andrea Gaudenzi, ATP Chairman. “Health and safety remains the top priority as we navigate the challenges ahead in these unprecedented times, and we will do everything we can for the Tour to resume at the earliest opportunity once it is safe to do so.”


    About the WTA:
    Founded by Billie Jean King in 1973 on the principle of equal opportunity for women in sports, the WTA is the global leader in women’s professional sport with more than 1,650 players representing 84 nations competing for a record $180 million in prize money. In 2019, the WTA was watched by a record breaking global audience of 700 million. The 2020 WTA Tour includes 53 events and four Grand Slams, spanning across six continents and 28 countries and regions. The season culminates with the Shiseido WTA Finals Shenzhen, offering a $14 million total prize purse and honoring the season’s top singles and doubles players. Further information on the WTA can be found at www.wtatennis.com.

    About the ATP:
    The ATP is the governing body of the men's professional tennis circuits — the ATP Tour, the ATP Challenger Tour and the ATP Champions Tour. With 64 tournaments in 30 countries, the ATP Tour showcases the finest male athletes competing in the world’s most exciting venues. From Australia to Europe and the Americas to Asia, the stars of the 2020 ATP Tour will battle for prestigious titles and FedEx ATP Rankings points at ATP Masters 1000, 500 and 250 events, as well as Grand Slams (non-ATP events). The 2020 season launched in January with the inaugural ATP Cup in Australia and will culminate with only the world’s top 8 qualified singles players and doubles teams competing for the last title of the season at the Nitto ATP Finals in November. Held at The O2 in London, the event will officially crown the 2020 ATP World No. 1. For more information, please visit www.ATPTour.com.

  13. #118

    Re: Covid19 & Tennis


    1 April 2020
    ATP & WTA ANNOUNCE FURTHER SUSPENSION OF TOURS
    In conjunction with the cancellation of The Championships, Wimbledon, the ATP and WTA have jointly announced the continued suspension of the ATP and WTA Tours until July 13, 2020, due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

    In addition to Wimbledon, the suspension covers the entirety of the ATP/WTA European grass court swing, including ATP events in ‘s-Hertogenbosch, Stuttgart, London-Queen’s, Halle, Mallorca, Eastbourne, as well as WTA events in ‘s-Hertogenbosch, Nottingham, Birmingham, Berlin, Eastbourne and Bad Homburg. The suspension comes into effect at all levels of the professional game, including the ATP Challenger Tour, as well as the ITF World Tennis Tour. At this time, tournaments taking place from July 13, 2020 onwards are still planning to proceed as per the published schedule.

    The ATP and WTA realise the importance and responsibility to prioritise the health and safety of the tennis community and general public while assessing the feasibility of the Tours' resumption.

    “Regrettably, the ongoing COVID-19 global pandemic leaves us with no choice but to suspend the Tour further; a decision we’ve made in close cooperation with our members and the other governing bodies of tennis,” said Andrea Gaudenzi, ATP Chairman. “Health and safety remains the top priority as we navigate the challenges ahead in these unprecedented times, and we will do everything we can for the Tour to resume at the earliest opportunity once it is safe to do so.”

    “This was a decision that the WTA and its members did not take lightly, however we remain vigilant in protecting the health and safety of our players, staff and fans,” said Steve Simon, WTA Chairman and CEO. “While we share in the disappointment of the season’s further postponement, our priority remains to support each other during this unprecedented time and work together as a sport in preparation of our return to play.”
    .

    # # #

    About The ATP

    The ATP is the governing body of the men's professional tennis circuits — the ATP Tour, the ATP Challenger Tour and the ATP Champions Tour. With 64 tournaments in 30 countries, the ATP Tour showcases the finest male athletes competing in the world’s most exciting venues. From Australia to Europe and the Americas to Asia, the stars of the 2020 ATP Tour will battle for prestigious titles and FedEx ATP Rankings points at ATP Masters 1000, 500 and 250 events, as well as Grand Slams (non-ATP events). The 2020 season launched in January with the inaugural ATP Cup in Australia and will culminate with only the world’s top 8 qualified singles players and doubles teams competing for the last title of the season at the Nitto ATP Finals in November. Held at The O2 in London, the event will officially crown the 2020 ATP World No. 1. For more information, please visit www.ATPTour.com.

    About The WTA

    Founded by Billie Jean King in 1973 on the principle of equal opportunity for women in sports, the WTA is the global leader in women’s professional sport with more than 1,650 players representing 84 nations competing for a record $180 million in prize money. In 2019, the WTA was watched by a record-breaking global audience of 700 million. The 2020 WTA Tour includes 53 events and four Grand Slams, spanning across six continents and 28 countries and regions. The season culminates with the Shiseido WTA Finals Shenzhen, offering a $14 million total prize purse and honouring the season’s top singles and doubles players. Further information on the WTA can be found at www.wtatennis.com.

  14. #119
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    Re: Covid19 & Tennis

    I know this got brought up before, but what was the answer about having a tournament with no audience? Was the conclusion that players should/would not travel for it? Or that it would be so difficult to run it while maintaining proper distancing among players/officials/staff that it is irresponsible to attempt? Surely fans and networks would love to have something live on tv this year...

  15. #120

    Re: Covid19 & Tennis

    Quote Originally Posted by Ti-Amie View Post
    Most of the events in China are played without fans so..
    Lol. Point made.
    Towel Avatar, do your thing!

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