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  1. #1306

    Re: covid-19 Virus Updates and Discussion

    Quote Originally Posted by Ti-Amie View Post
    Mary Ellen Klas @MaryEllenKlas
    an hour ago, 7 tweets, 2 min read

    .GovRonDeSantis decided to violate the state's public meeting laws and chose to exclude the @MiamiHerald and @TB_Times from a media briefing at the Capitol. He was so determined to keep us out, he had an FDLE vehicle pick up TV reporter Mike Vasilinda to give him back door access
    His media staff told another reporter, NSF's Jim Turner, that if he insisted that we be allowed in, Turner would be kept out. See video in the thread below.

    Want to know the questions @GovRonDeSantis didn't want to get today, so he kept us out?

    You are preparing four alternative hospitals to prepare for a surge in hospital capacity, please explain when Florida will reach its peak? What is the timeline?/thread

    You said you were going to be transparent throughout this process, why have to refused to disclose the nursing homes that have had COVID positive cases, except the one you considered negligent?

    Health care workers are especially at risk; a 33-year Miami-Dade Nurse has died from #COVID19, what are you doing to assist them?

    You are critical of the reckless behavior of people from NYC and NOLA. Are you fostering it by not imposing stricter restrictions across the state?

    https://threadreaderapp.com/thread/1...082769921.html

    Just like his "daddy".
    2017 & 2018 Australian Open Champions

  2. #1307

    Re: covid-19 Virus Updates and Discussion

    More from Flori-duh

    Travis Akers @travisakers
    This picture is from 3pm today.

    You can see exactly where Duval County ends and St. John’s County begins.

    All beaches in Duval are closed, while St. John’s only blocked parking at the beach.

    Gov. DeSantis needs to order a state-wide closure of all Florida beaches.


    Photo credit: Clay Archer, Jacksonville Beach resident

    Picture captured from his balcony with a 100-400GM with 1.6 extender.

    Media has permission to use the photo. He asks that if any outlets use the image to please credit him.
    There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life.”

    ― Frank Zappa





  3. #1308

    Re: covid-19 Virus Updates and Discussion

    Live updates: U.S. coronavirus-related deaths double in two days; Trump says New York area may be quarantined

    by
    Brittany Shammas,
    Emily Rauhala,
    Kim Bellware,
    Lateshia Beachum,
    Steven Goff,
    Jesse Dougherty and
    Hannah Knowles
    March 28, 2020 at 6:52 p.m. EDT

    PLEASE NOTE
    The Washington Post is providing this story for free so that all readers have access to this important information about the coronavirus. For more free stories, sign up for our daily Coronavirus Updates newsletter.

    Confirmed U.S. coronavirus-related deaths doubled in two days, hitting 2,000 on Saturday evening, based on reporting from state health departments. It took about a month from the first confirmed death for the United States to record 1,000, but the toll has risen rapidly, and officials say the worst is yet to come.

    Meanwhile, President Trump said Saturday he may announce later in the day a federally mandated quarantine on the New York metro region, placing “enforceable” travel restrictions on people planning to leave the New York tri-state area because of the coronavirus outbreak.

    Here are some significant developments:

    New York Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo (D) called a possible quarantine “preposterous," while New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy said Trump had not raised the policy to him and New York Mayor Bill de Blasio said he wasn’t “sure what the president means.”

    The Department of Health and Human Services’s civil rights office urged health-care providers to not ration care for covid-19 patients based on disability or age.

    Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker said Saturday that an infant who tested positive for the novel coronavirus has died.

    Italy has now seen more than 10,000 coronavirus fatalities. More than 600,000 people have been infected worldwide with 30,000 total deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University.

    1:24 p.m.
    The U.S. government’s quarantine powers are vast

    President Trump on Saturday said he is considering a quarantine on New York and parts of New Jersey and Connecticut as a further step in trying to contain the coronavirus.

    As The Post reported in February, regulations set forth by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention give health officials broad authority to quarantine or isolate anyone “reasonably believed” to have been exposed to a range of highly infectious diseases.

    This exceptional power is rooted in the Constitution’s Commerce Clause, which allows Congress to regulate foreign and interstate commerce.

    Quarantine involves the temporary confinement of people who may have been exposed to a disease but haven’t developed symptoms. Isolation separates people who are infected with a disease until they are no longer contagious.

    “It’s like a curfew or an evacuation order if a natural disaster occurs. Just like when a hurricane is bearing down, people are ordered to leave coastal areas because no one can save them,” Scott Burris, director of the Center for Public Health Law Research at Temple University, told The Post last month. “If we have a reasonable prospect of stopping or slowing this virus, even if we’re doing it with mittens on, the government can take emergency action.”

    The federal government seldom exercises this authority, mostly because it doesn’t have to. State and local governments generally take the lead in quarantine decisions, bearing the primary responsibility for the health of their residents. When disease outbreaks do occur, health officials often opt for voluntary quarantine or isolation, and people tend to follow their instructions.

    Read more here.

    By Derek Hawkins

    1:59 p.m.
    Boris Johnson continues to lead government efforts after testing positive for coronavirus

    LONDON — Prime Minister Boris Johnson, the first Group of 20 nation leader to test positive for the coronavirus, is continuing to lead the British government’s efforts to combat the virus, officials said Saturday.

    “The prime minister is showing mild symptoms,” said Business Secretary Alok Sharma, who was stepping in for the prime minister at 10 Downing Street’s daily news conference. Sharma stressed that Johnson was leading “right from the front” and said he held a video conference call in the morning. “I think the one thing this has reminded us is no one is immune,” Sharma said. Earlier in the week, Prince Charles, the heir to the British throne, announced he had tested positive.

    Johnson, 55, has been accused of not following his own guidance on social distancing. Hours after Johnson announced he had tested positive for the virus, Health Secretary Matt Hancock said he too had been infected. Scottish Secretary Alister Jack on Saturday said that he had not been tested but was showing symptoms of the virus.

    Johnson has said he will self-isolate from his home, an apartment above 11 Downing Street, but will continue to lead the national effort to combat the coronavirus “thanks to the wizardry of modern technology.”

    On Saturday, Britain surpassed the grim milestone of 1,000 deaths. Stephen Powis, medical director of National Health Service England who was also at Saturday’s news conference, said that if the United Kingdom can keep the death toll below 20,000, “we will have done very well.”

    By Karla Adam

    2:19 p.m.
    Kansas, Rhode Island join 22 other states with stay-at-home orders

    The governors of Kansas and Rhode Island announced stay-at-home orders Saturday, bringing the number of states under such a measure to 24.

    Rhode Island Gov. Gina Raimondo (D) issued the order after the state recorded its first two deaths from covid-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus. Officials have confirmed 239 cases of the virus, she said during a news conference, and 29 people are in the hospital.

    “The potential for the loss of life has loomed over us for weeks,” Raimondo said. “Today are the first two. There will be more to come."

    In Kansas, Gov. Laura Kelly (D) cited projections from state health officials that the state’s 200 confirmed cases could jump to 900 in the next week, telling reporters that “positive cases are appearing everywhere at this point.”

    Both governors said they believe their states have more cases of coronavirus than have been confirmed. They said their hospital systems need time to prepare for an anticipated swell.

    The orders require residents to remain home unless they are traveling for essential purposes, such as picking up food, seeking medical care or reporting to an essential job. Rhode Island’s is effective immediately and set to remain in place until April 13, while Kansas’s starts Monday and continues through April 19.

    By Brittany Shammas

    2:21 p.m.
    The CDC wants people to stop ingesting non-pharmaceutical chloroquine products

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued a health advisory on Saturday warning against use of non-pharmaceutical chloroquine phosphate and hydroxychloroquine.

    The health agency was alerted about an Arizona couple in their 60s who put a fish tank-cleaning chemical, chloroquine phosphate, into a soft drink and ingested it to stave off infection of the novel coronavirus. The husband died in a hospital and his wife was last reported to be in critical condition.

    “Clinicians should advise patients and the public that chloroquine, and the related compound hydroxychloroquine, should be used only under the supervision of a healthcare provider as prescribed medications,” the CDC said. While President Trump has been endorsing the promise of the antimalarials based on anecdotal reports, there is currently no FDA-approved prevention of covid-19, the agency reminded the public.

    By Lateshia Beachum

    The Ghoul was on Fox touting chloroquine and some other non prescription med today
    There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life.”

    ― Frank Zappa





  4. #1309

    Re: covid-19 Virus Updates and Discussion

    The coronavirus can damage the heart, even in people with no history of heart disease, new research suggests - showing it doesn't only affect the lungs

    AYLIN WOODWARDMAR 28, 2020, 03:08 IST

    While the most severe cases of the new coronavirus typica ..


    Read more at:
    https://www.businessinsider.in/scien...campaign=cppst

  5. #1310

    Re: covid-19 Virus Updates and Discussion

    Saturday 3/28/20 WaPo Updates P2

    4:06 p.m.
    Ohio governor calls on FDA to swiftly approve technology to sterilize PPEs for reuse

    An Ohio research company has developed technology to sterilize personal protective masks for reuse, Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine (R) said during a Saturday news conference. He urged the Food and Drug Administration to sign off quickly on the technology, which was created by the Columbus-based research and development nonprofit, Battelle. If approved, the technology could be used in other states, such as Washington and New York, that are experiencing critical protective gear shortages — and much higher infection totals than Ohio.

    Nearly 90 percent of U.S. mayors who responded to a national survey Friday said their cities lack adequate protection, which global health officials acknowledge is vital to containing the spread of the coronavirus.

    In Ohio, DeWine said state health officials are projecting the apex of outbreak to hit in the next 14 days; other governors, such as Andrew M. Cuomo (D) of New York, have projected similar timelines for their state.

    “We believe in two weeks we’re really gonna start getting hit hard and won’t peak out until May,” DeWine said, noting the state’s health reporting indicated local hospitals will have to double or even triple capacity to meet the projected demand.

    Ohio was among the earliest states to take action, with DeWine moving to ban large gatherings and shutter retail and social hubs well before it became a nationwide trend.

    Ohio Department of Health Director Amy Acton offered the rare sliver of good news amid the crisis when she said Ohio’s early and aggressive interventions have helped to flatten the curve. Acton likened the apex of the outbreak to a hurricane making landfall, with an ability to forecast big-picture movements that get clearer as it approaches.

    By Kim Bellware

    4:45 p.m.
    Yale responds after New Haven mayor blasts school for not opening its dorms to first responders

    New Haven Mayor Justin Elicker, a Yale University alumnus, slammed the prestigious Ivy League school on Friday for being unwilling to open its dorms to city workers.

    Elicker, speaking during a virtual news conference, said he called the university last week and requested dormitory space for police officers, firefighters and their families should there be any exposure or symptoms of the novel coronavirus. The university told him “no,” he said.

    He received a more welcoming response from University of New Haven President Steve Kaplan, who said “yes” in the first five minutes of their conversation, Elicker said.

    “Since then, UNH has rolled out the red carpet for us,” he said. “They’ve worked to quickly get students’ belongings out of the dorms. And they’ve worked with us to address other logistical and liability hurdles.”

    A final agreement will soon be finalized and city workers are expected to move into the dorms in the coming days, he said.

    On Thursday, Yale launched the Yale Community for New Haven fundraising tool, which has a $5 million goal to help health care and local businesses, the Yale Daily News reported. The university has already given $1 million to the fund, which is a partnership with the United Way of Greater New Haven and the Community Foundation for Greater New Haven.

    Spokeswoman Karen Peart told the New Haven Register on Friday that the dorms simply aren’t ready.

    “We are pursuing schemes that involve professional movers and packers, and using temporary storage. The process will take weeks, as all of the residence hall rooms on campus are filled with student belongings,” she told New Haven Register. “As soon as we have been able to clear any space, we have informed the mayor that we will let him know.”

    On Saturday, the school said it would make 300 beds available by the end of this coming week to first responders and hospital personnel.

    By Lateshia Beachum

    4:48 p.m.
    Ill. governor says infant with coronavirus has died

    Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker said Saturday that an infant who tested positive for the novel coronavirus has died, the youngest person in the country believed to have succumbed to the illness.

    An autopsy will determine whether the virus caused the death, state officials said. No other details were announced.

    “I want everyone to take covid-19 serious. If you haven’t been paying attention, maybe this is your wake-up call,” Illinois public health chief Ngozi Ezike said. “People of all ages and people, even healthy, will and have contracted the virus and can develop serious illness, including death.”

    The infant was among 13 deaths Saturday attributed to the virus, Pritzker (D) said. Illinois has reported 3,491 total known cases and 47 deaths.

    Although older people are more vulnerable to the illness, there have been numerous cases of youthful victims. Louisiana health officials announced Thursday that a 17-year-old from Orleans Parish died of covid-19, the disease the coronavirus causes.

    Two days earlier, Los Angeles County officials said they believed a teenager without preexisting conditions died of the illness, though additional test results were pending.

    By Steven Goff

    5:46 p.m.
    Bauer shifts production to medical gear, calls on others to join them


    An employee of Bauer Hockey Corp. models a medical face shield. The hockey equipment manufacturer has begun creating such face shields to help those treating the coronavirus pandemic. (AP)

    After Bauer, a U.S.-based company that manufactures hockey gear, announced Wednesday it would shift from making helmet visors to start mass production on face shields amid the novel coronavirus pandemic, it didn’t take long for the calls, emails and other messages to start rolling in.

    Medical professionals have contacted Bauer, asking for gear as they continue to work on the coronavirus front lines, according to the company. Since starting production of the face shields less than 48 hours ago, Bauer has received interest in more than 1 million medical shields. It is already set to produce 300,000 units — its current maximum capacity.

    “We are one company and we are not going to be able to make a dent to this thing, but one thing we can do is make a call for action for other companies,” Bauer Chief executive Ed Kinnaly said in a telephone interview Saturday afternoon.

    Read more here.

    6:01 p.m.
    Federal civil rights office tells health-care providers not to deny care to coronavirus patients based on disability or age

    The Department of Health and Human Services’s civil rights office on Saturday urged health-care providers to not ration care for covid-19 patients based on disability or age, a practice recently endorsed by two states.

    “Persons with disabilities should not be denied medical care on the basis of stereotypes, assessments of quality of life, or judgments about a person’s relative “worth” based on the presence or absence of disabilities,” according to a bulletin.

    Alabama’s response plan, dated for April 2020, says that hospitals should consider not offering ventilator support to people with certain disabilities or medical conditions. The state’s protocol states that “persons with severe mental retardation, advanced dementia or severe traumatic brain injury may be poor candidates for ventilator support.”

    Washington state’s protocol says that triage teams should consider transferring patients with certain disabilities or medical conditions to outpatient care.

    The Office of Civil Rights said that such discrimination by HHS-funded programs is prohibited by both law and regulations.

    “HHS is committed to leaving no one behind during an emergency, and this guidance is designed to help health-care providers meet that goal,” Roger Severino, the Office of Civil Rights’ Director, wrote in the bulletin. “Persons with disabilities, with limited English skills, or needing religious accommodations should not be put at the end of the line for health services during emergencies.”

    By Jesse Dougherty
    There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life.”

    ― Frank Zappa





  6. #1311

    Re: covid-19 Virus Updates and Discussion

    Saturday 3/28/20 WaPo Updates P3

    6:16 p.m.
    Cuomo strongly rejects Trump’s idea to quarantine New York metro area

    Cuomo offered a blistering response to Trump’s suggestion that people in the New York tri-state area be restricted from leaving, calling it “preposterous,” and equating it to imprisonment and “a declaration of war.”

    “I don’t even think it’s plausible. I don’t think it’s legal, and it would be total mayhem — I don’t have another word for it. Why you would want to create total pandemonium on top of a pandemic, I have no idea,” Cuomo said during an interview with CNN.

    Cuomo said he still hadn’t heard from the president about it and that if Trump was seriously considering it, “I guarantee he would have called me.”

    “This is a civil war kind of discussion. I don’t believe that he could be serious, that any federal administration could be serious about physical lockdowns of states or parts of states across this country,” Cuomo said.

    He added: “This would be a declaration of war on states, a federal declaration of war, and it wouldn’t just be New York, New Jersey, Connecticut. Next week it would be Louisiana with New Orleans, and the week after that it would be Detroit and Michigan, and it would run across the nation.”

    Cuomo also threatened to sue Rhode Island if it carried out a plan to stop cars coming into the state with New York license plates, calling it an idea to the “point of absurdity.”

    “I think that’s a reactionary policy, and I don’t think that’s legal, and we’re talking to Rhode Island now,” Cuomo said. “If they don’t roll back that policy, I’m going to sue Rhode Island because that’s clearly unconstitutional.”

    By Colby Itkowitz

    6:20 p.m.
    Rhode Island’s efforts to enforce quarantine on travelers from New York draw pushback

    Since Rhode Island Gov. Gina Raimondo called New York a “pinpointed risk” this week, state law enforcement officers have sought out incoming travelers from New York to enforce a 14-day quarantine — prompting New York Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo to say he will sue Rhode Island if Raimondo does not “roll back” the policy.

    “I know it’s unusual. I know it’s extreme, and I know some people disagree with it,” Raimondo said at a news conference Friday. “If you want to seek refuge in Rhode Island, you must be quarantined.”

    Raimondo mandated the 14-day quarantine for New York travelers on Thursday. She also announced that Rhode Island’s National Guard and state police would help enforce it by monitoring major bus stations and pulling over drivers with New York license plates.

    “New York City is a hot spot, their infection rate is skyrocketing, and they are so close to Rhode Island,” Raimondo said.

    As of 5 p.m. on Friday, Rhode Island had reported 203 covid-19 cases. As of Saturday evening, New York state had reported 52,318.

    Rhode Island’s tactics provoked criticism from the American Civil Liberties Union as well as Cuomo.

    “Under the Fourth Amendment, having a New York state license plate simply does not, and cannot, constitute ‘probable cause’ to allow police to stop a car and interrogate the driver, no matter how laudable the goal of the stop may be,” said Steven Brown, the executive director of Rhode Island’s ACLU chapter, in a statement.

    By Jesse Dougherty

    6:27 p.m.
    The U.S. recorded its first 1,000 coronavirus deaths in a month. The next 1,000 took two days.

    Confirmed U.S. coronavirus-related deaths doubled in two days, hitting 2,000 on Saturday evening, based on reporting from state health departments.

    It took about a month from the first confirmed death for the United States to record 1,000, but the toll has risen rapidly, and officials say the worst is yet to come. The earliest death was announced in Washington state on Feb. 29.

    The sharp rise in fatalities comes as the pandemic’s epicenter has shifted to the United States, where reported infections are approaching 120,000 and where President Trump said the federal government may enforce a quarantine on the hard-hit New York area. Officials and health professionals in New York and around the country have been sounding alarms that hospitals are not prepared for an influx of coronavirus patients.

    Globally, confirmed cases now exceed 600,000, according to a Johns Hopkins University tracker.

    By Hannah Knowles and Jacqueline Dupree

    6:52 p.m.
    Inslee responds to Trump, who said Pence shouldn’t call governors who aren’t ‘appreciative’

    Washington Gov. Jay Inslee on Saturday responded to President Trump’s comments that some governors are not grateful enough for federal assistance in battling the novel coronavirus, saying, “I don’t recall, in the oath of office, saying, ‘I’ll do my job to protect the citizens of Washington state as long as I get enough love.’ ”

    At a news conference in Seattle, the former Democratic presidential candidate said: “None of us are being distracted by the background noise that might come out of the White House. Our job is too important.”

    On Friday, Trump said he had instructed Vice President Pence not to reach out to governors who aren’t “appreciative” of his administration’s efforts.

    “If they don’t treat you right, I don’t call,” Trump said of state leaders, such as Inslee and Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, both Democrats. “I think they should be appreciative. We’ve done a great job.”

    Inslee on Saturday said that “insults aren’t going to stop us from working together. That includes FEMA, the Department of Health and the vice president, with whom I’ve had quite a number of good discussions.”

    Trump and Inslee clashed earlier this month when the president called Inslee “a snake” for criticizing the White House response to the coronavirus outbreak.

    Washington was the first state hit by the pandemic and, as of Friday, had confirmed 3,700 cases and 175 deaths.

    Whitmer said she had a “good call” with Pence on Saturday morning and that “we’ll keep working around the clock with FEMA and the White House to get more of the personal protective equipment we need.”

    By Steven Goff

    7:49 p.m.
    Cuomo anticipates 14 to 21 days until N.Y. outbreak peaks, as New York City alone records 222 deaths in 24 hours

    New York Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo (D) anticipates the coronavirus outbreak in New York state will reach its apex in “14 to 21 days,” based on health and science data projections, he said during a news conference Saturday. New York is the hardest-hit state in the United States so far, with more than 52,000 confirmed cases and at least 728 deaths.

    Later Saturday, New York City officials reported 222 new deaths in the past 24 hours, 155 of them since morning.

    In sharing the forecast of infections yet to come, Cuomo redoubled his call for more personal protective gear, such as masks, gowns and, crucially, ventilators. President Trump has publicly questioned Cuomo’s request for the lifesaving equipment and doubted the need for 30,000 to 40,000 ventilators.

    Cuomo addressed the skepticism for his large request, saying he’s only acting based on what the data from scientists say.

    “The numbers, the data says at the high point of need, you could need 140,000 hospital beds and 30,000 ventilators, as we’re planning for that ‘worst-case scenario,’ which the models predict,” Cuomo said. “I have no desire to procure more ventilators than we need.”

    The governor further shared his frustration that the cost of ventilators has risen in some cases by as much as $20,000 from their normal costs because of their scarcity. He has called for the federal government to nationalize the procurement of emergency equipment.


    By Kim Bellware
    There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life.”

    ― Frank Zappa





  7. #1312

    Re: covid-19 Virus Updates and Discussion

    Jesse Lehrich
    @JesseLehrich
    MA received 17% of requested medical supplies from the Trump admin. ME: 5%. CO: 1 day's worth.

    FL got everything they requested. + an identical shipment the next week. oh, and a 3rd is on the way.
    https://washingtonpost.com/national/...034_story.html



    There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life.”

    ― Frank Zappa





  8. #1313

    Re: covid-19 Virus Updates and Discussion

    Michelangelo Signorile @MSignorile

    Now Trump say he won’t be having an “enforced quarantine” of NYC after all — mostly because he can’t, but says the Task Force advised him. Instead is issuing a “travel advisory.”

    Meanwhile, I’m sure a bunch of people panicked and are on their way who knows where.

    Idiot.
    There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life.”

    ― Frank Zappa





  9. #1314

    Re: covid-19 Virus Updates and Discussion

    Chip Brownlee @ByChipBrownlee
    There are now more than 700 lab-confirmed cases of COVID-19 in Alabama.

    This time on Wednesday we had 242 cases.

    https://www.alreporter.com/mapping-c...us-in-alabama/
    There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life.”

    ― Frank Zappa





  10. #1315

    Re: covid-19 Virus Updates and Discussion

    Quote Originally Posted by Ti-Amie View Post
    Michelangelo Signorile @MSignorile

    Now Trump say he won’t be having an “enforced quarantine” of NYC after all — mostly because he can’t, but says the Task Force advised him. Instead is issuing a “travel advisory.”

    Meanwhile, I’m sure a bunch of people panicked and are on their way who knows where.

    Idiot.
    Constitutional lawyers shot down the idea and I'm guessing it got back to his staff. I don't know who said it was possible, but hope they attached their names to it because anyone making that claim should be required to state the specific law or code that gives it rather than some idea that the CDC has powers to quarantine entire states and what challenges were made to the law.That is so not what the Constitution says. Those powers rest with the states.

    It would be really great if every senior member of the WH administration sat down this weekend and read the damn Constitution.

  11. #1316

    Re: covid-19 Virus Updates and Discussion

    Is it really not possible by law to quarantine a specific area or a state in US? It was possible in Italy and now is being done in Finland too. Would be very useful albeit in the case of NYC probably too late now.
    Roger forever

  12. #1317

    Re: covid-19 Virus Updates and Discussion

    Quote Originally Posted by suliso View Post
    Is it really not possible by law to quarantine a specific area or a state in US? It was possible in Italy and now is being done in Finland too. Would be very useful albeit in the case of NYC probably too late now.
    It can be done, but it has to be done at the state level.

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