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  1. #2656

    Re: covid-19 Virus Updates and Discussion

    "Says who?"......I know that people are going to do what people are going to do. But I am one who says (and I'm basing it on evidence as mentioned above), that this is a very unwise practice. And the lead choral experts in this country are on my side on this. I would go so far as to call resumption of any choral activity irresponsible with what we know about droplet spread. There is no evidence to suggest it can be done safely right now, and plenty to the contrary.

    Still, I wish your friend's group well. You must surely understand that, with my musical bent, I am grieved that musical ensembles are being so significantly affected. But the lives of me, my partner, and my colleagues matter more to me than making music in a big group right now.

    GH

  2. #2657

    Re: covid-19 Virus Updates and Discussion

    It was also my mistake of generalizing too much here. The epidemiological situation in Switzerland is clearly very different right now than in US. I do hope you get to engage in all your musical endeavours next year at least.
    Roger forever

  3. #2658
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    Re: covid-19 Virus Updates and Discussion

    WHO's Situation Report for May 28, 2020. Excerpts from the newsletter:

    EPI UPDATE The WHO COVID-19 Situation Report for May 28 reports 5.59 million confirmed cases (104,505 new) and 353,334 deaths (4,221 new). While national-level daily incidence is decreasing for the United States, many countries across Europe, and others that were affected earlier in the pandemic, the overall global trend is increasing. The overall increase is driven largely by increasing incidence in Asia and South America, with more minor increases in Africa and Central America, particularly Mexico.

    Brazil reported 26,417 new cases, its highest daily total to date and more than 25% greater than its previous high. Brazil’s daily incidence has more than doubled since March 14, and its national epidemic appears to be accelerating. Brazil has surpassed the United States as #1 in terms of daily incidence, now exceeding the US daily incidence by more than 20%. Peru and Chile continue to exhibit concerning trends as well. Both are currently reporting 3-4 times the per capita incidence as the United States and still increasing. Additionally, Peru and Chile are #5 and #6 in terms of total daily incidence, with 5,874 and 4,654 new cases, respectively. Mexico’s COVID-19 epidemic also continues its acceleration, with 3,377 new cases. Mexico has reported its 3 highest daily totals over the past 3 days. Brazil, Chile, Mexico, and Peru represent 4 of the top 7 countries globally in terms of daily incidence—and Colombia is #17.

    Russia reported its 2 lowest daily totals since May 2 over the past 2 days. It appears that Russia is continuing its decline from a peak daily incidence on May 12. India reported 7,466 new cases, its highest daily incidence to date. It appears that India’s COVID-19 is continuing to accelerate—doubling its daily incidence since mid-May—and if the recent trends continue, India could surpass Russia as #3 in terms of daily incidence in the coming days.

    Singapore reported 611 new cases, including 602 (98.5%) among residents of migrant worker dormitories. Singapore estimates that the cases confirmed so far represent 9.78% of the total population across all migrant worker dormitories, compared to only 0.03% of the general public population. Of the total confirmed cases reported in Singapore, 93.3% are among residents of migrant worker dormitories, including 98.8% over the past 2 weeks. While Singapore’s epidemic largely remains confined to migrant worker dormitories, Singapore continues to report hundreds of cases a day among residents of these facilities, and these outbreaks risk spillover into the broader community.

    South Korea has reported elevated daily incidence over the past several days, including its 3 highest daily values—40 new cases on May 27, 79 on May 28, and 58 on May 29—since April 8. South Korea has identified multiple COVID-19 clusters, particularly in and around Seoul, following decisions to relax some social distancing measures in early May. The Korean CDC has identified 266 cases linked to night clubs and 102 cases associated with a logistics warehouse. The recent increase in COVID-19 incidence led South Korea to re-impose certain social distancing restrictions in affected areas, including enhanced social distancing measures and inspections for some businesses and recommendations for the public to refrain from non-essential activities. The measures are scheduled to remain in place through June 14.

    Immediately following a large, one-day decrease in reported incidence, South Africa reported its 2 highest daily totals to date. The daily incidence over the past 2 days is more than double the value reported on May 27, and it exceeded 1,500 new cases for the first time. South Africa is currently reporting the highest cumulative COVID-19 incidence and highest daily incidence in Africa.

    France reported a major spike in new cases today. After remaining below 1,000 new cases for several weeks, France reported more than 3,000 new cases in a single day. France has previously reported similar large, one-day spikes, approximately every 2-3 weeks, before returning to normal incidence. At this time, the reason for this dramatic increase is unclear.

    ::

    FLEEING QUARANTINE Hundreds of individuals reportedly fled from quarantine facilities in Malawi and Zimbabwe. At least 46 of more than 400 quarantined individuals that fled in Malawi tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, and more than 100 individuals fled quarantine in Zimbabwe. Notably, “nearly all of Zimbabwe’s 75 new cases this week” were identified in quarantined individuals. Many of the quarantined individuals recently arrived, “sometimes involuntarily,” from South Africa or Botswana. According to the report, enforcement of the quarantine and appropriate protective measures were lax at the quarantine sites, and quarantined individuals and their families were observed entering and exiting the quarantine area freely, including to buy food at local markets. Efforts are ongoing to track down the individuals. Both Zimbabwe and Malawi have reported relatively low COVID-19 incidence to date; however, a sudden influx of infectious individuals into the community could potentially result in significant increases in local transmission.

    https://www.who.int/docs/default-sou...sitrep-129.pdf
    Winston, a.k.a. Alvena Rae Risley Hiatt (1944-2019), RIP

  4. #2659

    Re: covid-19 Virus Updates and Discussion

    These Athletes Had the Coronavirus. Will They Ever Be the Same?
    Von Miller of the Denver Broncos called the disease a “surreal” experience and said he struggled at first to workout. Other athletes have endured lingering lung and other health issues.

    By Andrew Keh
    May 29, 2020, 12:43 p.m. ET

    It was the end of March, and Josh Fiske, a urologist from Livingston, N.J., was in the hospital fighting an uphill battle against the coronavirus. Just a week earlier, he had easily jogged a five-mile route around his neighborhood. But his body was failing him now.

    His oxygen levels dipped dangerously low, and his fever rocketed to a worrying 104 degrees. Shifting his body in bed exhausted him. Walking a few steps felt like “hiking in thin air.” Opening a bottle of iced tea was “a huge task.”

    Fiske kept fighting, though, and eventually, with the help of his doctors, he turned a corner. Yet even as he did, even as he seemed assured of avoiding the worst outcomes of the virus, a different sort of anxiety consumed him.

    “I started to think, ‘Am I going to be able to run again? Am I going to be able to walk the golf course?’” said Fiske, 46, who does a marathon or half-marathon every year. “These are things I love to do.”

    The coronavirus has infected millions of people around the world. Athletes tend to view themselves as perhaps better equipped than the general population to avoid the worst consequences of the disease the virus causes, Covid-19.

    Yet interviews with athletes who have contracted the virus — from professionals to college athletes to weekend hobbyists — revealed their surprise at the potency of its symptoms, struggles to reestablish workout regimens, lingering battles with lung issues and muscle weakness, and unsettling bouts of anxiety about whether they would be able to match their physical peaks.

    And with sports leagues around the world scrambling to restart play, more athletes could soon be taking on a significant amount of risk.

    “It definitely shook me up a bit — it was very surreal, you know?” Von Miller, a linebacker for the Denver Broncos who contracted the virus, said in an interview. “My biggest takeaway from this experience is that no matter how great of shape you are in physically, no matter what your age is, that you’re not immune from things like this.”


    Miller, who has had asthma his whole life, said he was left shaken up by shortness of breath and coughing when he tried to sleep. He said he felt himself “fatiguing faster” when he first tried working out again in his home gym, but that now he was training “full-on” again.

    Experts warn that the virus does not discriminate.

    That was the lesson Andrew Boselli, an offensive lineman at Florida State, learned as members of his family — including his father, Tony, 47, a former N.F.L. lineman — began showing symptoms in March.

    “I knew I was young and healthy,” said Boselli, 22, who moved home to Jacksonville, Fla., after the university closed its doors. “I play Division 1 football, and I’ve been training my butt off all winter and spring. I thought I had no worries. I wasn’t going to get it.”

    That bullish attitude faded days later, when he awoke feeling sluggish and short of breath. That night, his body temperature climbed to 104.

    “It was the sickest I’ve ever felt,” said Boselli, who continued to feel shortness of breath and fatigue for about week and a half.

    In Italy, Paulo Dybala, an Argentine player with Juventus, described his own unnerving experience dealing with respiratory symptoms.

    “I would try to train and was short of breath after five or 10 minutes,” Dybala said in an interview with the Argentine Football Association, “and we realized something was not right.”

    Panagis Galiatsatos, a pulmonary physician and assistant professor at Johns Hopkins, said that, like much about the disease, the long-term consequences for athletes who contract it are not fully understood. Athletes, though, represent interesting case studies for doctors, given their generally good baseline health and nuanced awareness of their own bodies.

    “Patients who are athletes, I love them, because they will pick up subtle changes sometimes way before even the tests identify a disease,” Galiatsatos said.

    Galiatsatos singled out three complications from Covid-19 that could be of particular concern to athletes.

    First, coronavirus patients, like anyone with a serious respiratory infection, were at risk for long-term lung issues. He often saw patients “who three months ago had a bad virus and still can’t get their breathing back to normal.”

    “Sometimes a bad virus creates an airway disease similar to an asthma,” he said. “They can ravage the lungs, where the lungs were rebuilt, but not well, and patients are stuck with an asthmalike reactive airway disease situation.”

    Another complication that Galiatsatos considered particularly concerning to athletes, and one that experts were still trying to wrap their heads around, was the high incidence of blood clots that doctors were seeing in coronavirus patients. People diagnosed with blood clots, and prescribed blood thinners, are typically discouraged from participating in contact sports.

    Finally, Galiatsatos said people unfortunate enough to be placed in intensive care could deal with “I.C.U. acquired weakness.” Patients placed on ventilators and confined to a bed often lost between 2 and 10 percent of their muscle mass per day, he said.

    Ben O’Donnell, a triathlete who lives in Onoka County, Minn., lost 45 pounds during a four-week hospital stay during which he was placed on a ventilator and a short-term life support machine.

    O’Donnell, 38, a former college football player who completed an Ironman race a couple of years ago and was planning on doing another this fall, said he was pulled back from the brink of death after struggling with dangerously low levels of oxygen and kidney and liver failure in the intensive care unit.


    In mid-February, in anticipation of ramping up his training, O’Donnell had completed a two-day, comprehensive physical exam and received a clean bill of health. Doctors believe he contracted the virus five days later.

    Back at home after his harrowing month in the hospital, O’Donnell has set his sights on competing in an Ironman race in Arizona this fall. He acknowledged it was a lofty goal.

    “They’re not sure if I’ll ever get full lung capacity back,” he said. “I may or may not.”

    Had he not contracted the virus, O’Donnell, an executive at a chemical company, would be doing three runs, three swims and three bicycle workouts per week at this point in his training cycle. But the virus derailed his life plans.

    After returning home, he needed a walker just to go out to the mailbox at the end of the driveway. In his first attempt to exercise, two days after he left the hospital, he walked for seven minutes at a speed of 1.2 miles per hour using supplemental oxygen. He has been trying to add a minute of time, and a bit of speed, each day.

    O’Donnell said he was struggling with “a fair amount of doubt” about his ability to get back in shape for the race. But he has motivated himself with the secondary goal of raising money for coronavirus relief, and he has been repeating the same mantra ever since he was struggling in his hospital bed: “Don’t stop. Don’t quit. Keep moving forward.”

    This mentality has helped other athletes who have been hit with serious symptoms.

    The 29 days Tsang Yee-ting spent in the hospital were the most she had been away from a karate mat since being introduced to the sport at age 6. A member of the Hong Kong national team, Tsang, 27, contracted the coronavirus in March while preparing to qualify for the Summer Olympics.

    For the next month, she battled a range of symptoms, the worst a searing pain that engulfed the lower half of her body. Walking was a struggle. Lying down offered no relief. Fighting a virus that doctors were still only learning about, “all sorts of thoughts” about her body and about her future spiraled through her mind, she said.

    “Of course I was worried,” Tsang said. “Karate is my life.”

    But even as the virus and isolation from her family levied an “emotional toll” on her, Tsang resolved to stay as active as possible to keep herself sane. She acquired elastic bands and, on days when her body felt strong enough, completed mini-workouts in the tight confines of her hospital room.

    “Battling the virus was like training for a competition,” said Tsang, who said she now felt normal again and has been training with her teammates over video.

    Fiske, the urologist, has been working, very slowly, to get back into shape after his weeklong I.C.U. stay in March.

    Fiske said he found himself relying on the same mental calisthenics he might have used to get through a punishing long-distance run — “when you’re having a tough time, and you decide to do another mile or two to see if you can break through it” — to stave off negative thoughts about his recovery.

    Since returning home, his focus has been on regaining lung strength. He could not walk up the stairs without becoming “totally gassed.” He could not hold a conversation.

    But it pained him to think that he might not be able to run, to golf or to exercise with his two teenage sons. So he has persisted with breathing exercises and laboring jogs through his neighborhood. Recently, he was able to finish his old five-mile route — albeit at a different pace.

    “They’re slow,” he said of the miles. “But they’re there.”

    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/29/s...?smid=tw-share
    “No matter how cynical I get, I just can't keep up.” – Lily Tomlin.




  5. #2660

    Re: covid-19 Virus Updates and Discussion

    Administration initially dispensed scarce covid-19 drug to some hospitals that didn’t need it
    Officials describe early missteps that delayed treatment to critically ill patients


    A mural honoring workers at Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx. (Noam Galai/Getty Images)

    By
    Yasmeen Abutaleb,
    Josh Dawsey,
    Lena H. Sun and
    Laurie McGinley
    May 28, 2020 at 5:46 p.m. EDT

    The Trump administration mishandled the initial distribution of the only approved coronavirus medication, delaying treatment to some critically ill patients with covid-19, the disease caused by the virus, according to nine current and former senior administration officials.

    The first tranche of 607,000 vials of the antiviral medication remdesivir, donated to the government by drugmaker Gilead Sciences, was distributed in early May — in some cases to the wrong hospitals, to hospitals with no intensive care units and therefore no eligible patients, and to facilities without the needed refrigeration to store it, meaning some had to be returned to the government, said the officials familiar with the distribution effort.

    Demand for remdesivir soared after the National Institutes of Health announced on April 29 that a clinical trial had shown that hospitalized patients with advanced covid-19 who received the experimental drug recovered faster than similar patients who received a placebo. Two days later, the Food and Drug Administration, citing those results, approved the drug to treat severely ill patients.

    Doctors said that because the drug is the only approved treatment for covid-19 patients and in extremely short supply, any delay or reduced availability would be potentially catastrophic.

    “We think the earlier you get it when you’re critically ill, the more likely it is to be beneficial, so delays could end up making the difference between whether the drug is effective or not,” said Ashish Jha, director of the Harvard Global Health Institute and a practicing physician. “The fact that we’d be so incompetent in our distribution of this that we’d … inefficiently distribute the one therapy we have is stunning. How can we make that mistake? What are you working on that’s more important than this?”

    The government’s initial distribution in the first week of May was so problematic that White House coronavirus response coordinator Deborah Birx shared fallout from state health and hospital officials with senior staffers on the task force, according to three senior administration officials. State officials had expressed anger and frustration that the government initially decided which hospitals to send the drug to without consulting them.

    The missteps also raised concerns about how the government might handle the distribution of vaccines, which are likely to be in even greater demand when they become available. “I hope the experience with remdesivir has taught decision-makers to be more prepared and more strategic” about handling vaccines, said Steven Joffe, a medical ethicist at the University of Pennsylvania.

    A spokeswoman for the Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR), which oversaw the distribution, did not address whether the drug went to the wrong hospitals or whether any of it had to be sent back as a result. She instead pointed to a Web page explaining how ASPR was allocating the drug.

    As of last week, about 80 percent of the donated remdesivir from Gilead had been distributed, according to ASPR. Gilead plans to donate an additional 333,160 vials of the drug by mid-June, according to HHS, bringing the total donation to 940,000 vials.

    The accounts shared by state and federal officials indicate that ASPR began sending out cases of the donated drug to hospitals in the first days of May. On a May 5 call, ASPR first informed state health officials it was distributing the experimental drug to hospitals across the country, said one state health official who spoke on the condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak about a private call. The initial batch of medicine was sent to facilities in 13 states, he said.

    Many hospitals were not prepared to receive the medication, however, because they were not alerted ahead of time, said several senior administration officials and hospital and state officials. State health officials initially did not know how the government was deciding where to send such a limited supply of the medication.

    “That caught everyone by surprise,” the state health official said. “The states should have been part of the decision-making. They should not be told after the fact about what’s being put in motion.”

    Some of the medication was sent to Montefiore Medical Center in New York, for instance, but the hospital did not have the refrigerator space to store the drug, according to two senior administration officials and one New York health official. Montefiore did not respond to numerous requests for comment. It is unclear what happened to those vials of the drug.


    On that same May 5 call after the first distribution, state officials told Robert Kadlec, HHS assistant secretary for preparedness and response, that the data the agency was relying upon was problematic, said the state official on the call.

    ASPR initially used data that showed hospital ICU bed capacity and size, as well as county-level case data, the state official said. But state officials told Kadlec that the data overstated the need in some parts of the country while underestimating it in others, the state official said.

    “States were disappointed. They were upset. ‘Why are you doing it this way?’” the official recalled them saying.

    On May 9, ASPR altered the process, announcing that it would send the drug to states, which would then decide which facilities would get the medicine, how much and when — much as they handle distribution from the Strategic National Stockpile, the state health official said.

    Hospital and state officials said the process has since drastically improved.

    AmerisourceBergen, which distributed the drug for Gilead while following the government’s directives, denied there were any problems in the company’s distribution of remdesivir to states and hospitals.

    “AmerisourceBergen representatives contacted every facility, including both health systems and state health departments, designated by the government to receive Remdesivir prior to shipping product to ensure they had cold chain capability and were prepared to receive the drug,” company spokesman Gabe Weissman said in a statement. “Upon completion of these shipments, AmerisourceBergen confirmed with each recipient that the quantity and temperature of the delivered medication was appropriate.”

    Daniel Abazia, director of pharmacy for Capital Health, a two-hospital system in southern New Jersey, said the confusion that surrounded the initial rollout of remdesivir dissipated as the state took over the allocation.

    He said the health system has gotten two shipments of the drug and now is in a “good position,” especially since its number of covid-19 patients is decreasing.

    Now, with a more coordinated federal response, states and hospitals are grappling with decisions about how to allocate the scarce medication and which covid-19 patients should get it. Some hospitals are administering the drug to as many patients as they can who meet the FDA criteria, without worrying about whether the drug might run out. Critics of that system say it could hurt patients who get sick later. Other hospitals are adding conditions or using modified lotteries.

    The University of Pittsburgh Medical Center has more than five dozen covid-19 patients who will qualify for the drug over the next two weeks but the health system has enough for only 16 patients, said Douglas White, a critical-care physician and ethicist there.

    To distribute the drug fairly, he said, UPMC relies on a modified lottery that gives extra weight to people who are essential workers, such as bus drivers and grocery store workers, as well as to disadvantaged individuals who traditionally have less access to the health system. Those with terminal illnesses are given slightly less weight in the lottery.

    “The amazing thing about this is that we spent so much time preparing for ventilator shortages that didn’t happen — there was lots of smoke and no fire,” White said.

    The remdesivir shortage, by contrast, “is already happening around the country,” he said. “It has come up very quickly, and a lot of people are on their back foot, trying to figure out what to do.”

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/healt...navirus-trump/
    “No matter how cynical I get, I just can't keep up.” – Lily Tomlin.




  6. #2661
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    Re: covid-19 Virus Updates and Discussion

    Quote Originally Posted by suliso View Post
    Update from Switzerland: 559 active cases (population ca 9 million), averaging ca 15 new cases and 3-4 deaths per day over the last two weeks

    - Border with Austria, Germany and France to be open for professional and recreational visits from June 15th (Italy to follow at a later date)
    - Free movement over the entire Schengen area to be restored from July 6th (from Swiss point of view, other countries might have restrictions, quarantines etc)
    - Extraordinary situation to be abolished from June 6th with power going back to local municipalities
    - Private gatherings up to 30 people, public up to 300 from May 30th
    - Theatres, swimming pools, campsites to open from June 6th. Also relaxed rules regarding density in restaurants

    Limited social distancing and ban on very large events (music festivals, pro footbal matches with spectators etc) will likely remain till September at least.

    I'm cautiously optimistic that I'll be able to fly to Latvia in August without any stupid quarantines (Latvian virus situation fine as well).

    Are they planning to resume passenger train communications on June 15 as well, to Austria, Germany, and France? Just curious


  7. #2662
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    Re: covid-19 Virus Updates and Discussion

    Quote Originally Posted by suliso View Post
    Yes, albeit it is because situation in Sweden is holding steady (see in the link below) there as elsewhere in Europe it is improving.

    https://www.worldometers.info/corona...ountry/sweden/
    I'd love to understand how a 1% incidence of critical cases results in a 47% death rate among resolved cases. Are they keeping "mild cases" active for weeks and weeks and not "concluding" them as recovered? Or are they not so mild?


  8. #2663

    Re: covid-19 Virus Updates and Discussion

    Quote Originally Posted by mmmm8 View Post
    Are they planning to resume passenger train communications on June 15 as well, to Austria, Germany, and France? Just curious
    I think so. There is already limited service to Germany from Basel. Albeit right now only long distance and not trams or S-Bahn.
    Roger forever

  9. #2664

    Re: covid-19 Virus Updates and Discussion

    Quote Originally Posted by mmmm8 View Post
    I'd love to understand how a 1% incidence of critical cases results in a 47% death rate among resolved cases. Are they keeping "mild cases" active for weeks and weeks and not "concluding" them as recovered? Or are they not so mild?
    Interesting... Not sure about this either. I was just looking at daily death and infection rates which holds roughly steady.
    Roger forever

  10. #2665

    Re: covid-19 Virus Updates and Discussion

    Quote Originally Posted by dryrunguy View Post
    WHO's Situation Report for May 28, 2020. Excerpts from the newsletter:

    EPI UPDATE The WHO COVID-19 Situation Report for May 28 reports 5.59 million confirmed cases (104,505 new) and 353,334 deaths (4,221 new). While national-level daily incidence is decreasing for the United States, many countries across Europe, and others that were affected earlier in the pandemic, the overall global trend is increasing. The overall increase is driven largely by increasing incidence in Asia and South America, with more minor increases in Africa and Central America, particularly Mexico.

    Brazil reported 26,417 new cases, its highest daily total to date and more than 25% greater than its previous high. Brazil’s daily incidence has more than doubled since March 14, and its national epidemic appears to be accelerating. Brazil has surpassed the United States as #1 in terms of daily incidence, now exceeding the US daily incidence by more than 20%. Peru and Chile continue to exhibit concerning trends as well. Both are currently reporting 3-4 times the per capita incidence as the United States and still increasing. Additionally, Peru and Chile are #5 and #6 in terms of total daily incidence, with 5,874 and 4,654 new cases, respectively. Mexico’s COVID-19 epidemic also continues its acceleration, with 3,377 new cases. Mexico has reported its 3 highest daily totals over the past 3 days. Brazil, Chile, Mexico, and Peru represent 4 of the top 7 countries globally in terms of daily incidence—and Colombia is #17.

    Russia reported its 2 lowest daily totals since May 2 over the past 2 days. It appears that Russia is continuing its decline from a peak daily incidence on May 12. India reported 7,466 new cases, its highest daily incidence to date. It appears that India’s COVID-19 is continuing to accelerate—doubling its daily incidence since mid-May—and if the recent trends continue, India could surpass Russia as #3 in terms of daily incidence in the coming days.

    Singapore reported 611 new cases, including 602 (98.5%) among residents of migrant worker dormitories. Singapore estimates that the cases confirmed so far represent 9.78% of the total population across all migrant worker dormitories, compared to only 0.03% of the general public population. Of the total confirmed cases reported in Singapore, 93.3% are among residents of migrant worker dormitories, including 98.8% over the past 2 weeks. While Singapore’s epidemic largely remains confined to migrant worker dormitories, Singapore continues to report hundreds of cases a day among residents of these facilities, and these outbreaks risk spillover into the broader community.

    South Korea has reported elevated daily incidence over the past several days, including its 3 highest daily values—40 new cases on May 27, 79 on May 28, and 58 on May 29—since April 8. South Korea has identified multiple COVID-19 clusters, particularly in and around Seoul, following decisions to relax some social distancing measures in early May. The Korean CDC has identified 266 cases linked to night clubs and 102 cases associated with a logistics warehouse. The recent increase in COVID-19 incidence led South Korea to re-impose certain social distancing restrictions in affected areas, including enhanced social distancing measures and inspections for some businesses and recommendations for the public to refrain from non-essential activities. The measures are scheduled to remain in place through June 14.

    Immediately following a large, one-day decrease in reported incidence, South Africa reported its 2 highest daily totals to date. The daily incidence over the past 2 days is more than double the value reported on May 27, and it exceeded 1,500 new cases for the first time. South Africa is currently reporting the highest cumulative COVID-19 incidence and highest daily incidence in Africa.

    France reported a major spike in new cases today. After remaining below 1,000 new cases for several weeks, France reported more than 3,000 new cases in a single day. France has previously reported similar large, one-day spikes, approximately every 2-3 weeks, before returning to normal incidence. At this time, the reason for this dramatic increase is unclear.

    ::

    FLEEING QUARANTINE Hundreds of individuals reportedly fled from quarantine facilities in Malawi and Zimbabwe. At least 46 of more than 400 quarantined individuals that fled in Malawi tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, and more than 100 individuals fled quarantine in Zimbabwe. Notably, “nearly all of Zimbabwe’s 75 new cases this week” were identified in quarantined individuals. Many of the quarantined individuals recently arrived, “sometimes involuntarily,” from South Africa or Botswana. According to the report, enforcement of the quarantine and appropriate protective measures were lax at the quarantine sites, and quarantined individuals and their families were observed entering and exiting the quarantine area freely, including to buy food at local markets. Efforts are ongoing to track down the individuals. Both Zimbabwe and Malawi have reported relatively low COVID-19 incidence to date; however, a sudden influx of infectious individuals into the community could potentially result in significant increases in local transmission.

    https://www.who.int/docs/default-sou...sitrep-129.pdf
    Re bolded paragraph:

    David Waldman-1, of Yorktown LLC™ @KagroX
    · 1m
    Brazil becomes the second country in the world to report more than 450,000 cases of COVID-19.

    It has been under 2 says since Brazil passed 400,000 cases.
    “No matter how cynical I get, I just can't keep up.” – Lily Tomlin.




  11. #2666

    Re: covid-19 Virus Updates and Discussion

    Ben Collins @oneunderscore__

    Here's that story:

    One of the largest publishers of coronavirus disinformation on Facebook, including "Plandemic," has been banned from the platform for using content farms from Macedonia and the Philippines.
    Troll farms from Macedonia and the Philippines pushed coronavirus disinformation on Facebook
    Facebook banned one of the most prolific pushers of medical disinformation after finding its articles had been spread for foreign trolls.

    May 29, 2020, 3:23 PM EDT
    By Ben Collins and Brandy Zadrozny

    One of the largest publishers of coronavirus disinformation on Facebook has been banned from the platform for using content farms from Macedonia and the Philippines, Facebook said on Friday.

    The publisher, Natural News, was one of the most prolific pushers of the viral “Plandemic” conspiracy video, which falsely claimed that the coronavirus is part of an elaborate government plot to control the populace through vaccines, and erroneously claimed that wearing a mask increases the risk of catching the coronavirus.

    Facebook said that it had found foreign trolls repeatedly posted content from Natural News, an anti-vaccination news site that frequently posts false coronavirus conspiracy theories about 5G towers and Bill Gates. They also posted content from Natural News' sister websites, NewsTarget and Brighteon, in an effort to artificially inflate their reach.

    “We removed these Pages for spammy and abusive behavior, not the content they posted. They misled people about the popularity of their posts and relied on content farms in Macedonia and the Philippines,” Facebook said in a statement.


    Facebook said the actions came as part of its routine enforcement against spam networks. Among other irregular behaviors, Natural News posted its content at an unusually high frequency, attempting to evade rate limits, which effectively tripped Facebook’s spam alarms, the company said.

    Natural News’ official Facebook page was banned from Facebook last year, but the site evaded the ban by posting content on Natural News-branded disinformation groups titled “Amazing Cures” and “GMO Dangers,” which had hundreds of thousands of followers.

    After Facebook’s discovery of foreign platform manipulation, the company banned all users from posting links to Natural News and its sister sites across the entirety of the site on May 19.

    Natural News is a website owned and operated by Mike Adams, a dietary supplement purveyor who goes by the moniker “The Health Ranger.” Adam's operation is by farthe worst spreader of health misinformation online, according to an NBC News analysis.

    Last year, the website hosted the most engaged-with article about cancer on the internet. The April article, “Cancer industry not looking for a cure; they’re too busy making money,” which promoted the baseless conspiracy theory that “Big Pharma” is hiding a known cure for cancer to keep people sick, garnered 5.4 million shares, comments and reactions, mostly on Facebook, according to data compiled through BuzzSumo, a social media analytics company.

    Over its 25 years of operation, Natural News has hosted thousands of articles that reject scientific consensus, promote fake cures and spread conspiracy theories. Its articles have also targeted scientists and doctors for harassment and violence. In April, the site had 3.5 million unique viewers, according to the internet analytics company SimilarWeb.

    Natural News was banned by Facebook in June 2019 for using “misleading or inaccurate information” to attract engagement, according to a statement from Facebook. Natural News had nearly 3 million followers at the time.

    “It’s long overdue,” said David Gorski, an oncologist at Wayne State University who writes about health misinformation and pseudoscience at the website Science Based Medicine. “Natural News and Mike Adams have been as harmful to public discourse on science, medicine, and also politics as Alex Jones, whom he very much resembles.”

    Adams did not respond to a request for comment, but addressed the ban on his website on Tuesday, calling it “digital book burning” and urging readers to complain to Facebook and file a civil rights complaint with the Department of Justice.

    Avaaz, an activist organization that campaigns against disinformation online, released a study on Friday claiming that Natural News reached new heights after its initial ban last year by creating informal subgroups that spammed the social media network with health disinformation.


    “Since the takedown has happened, Natural News has reached hundreds of millions of people by utilizing an entire universe of pages that are pushing this disinformation,” said Luca Nicotra, a researcher and senior campaigner at Avaaz.

    Avaaz’s research found that Natural News’ content had more engagement on Facebook than links to the WHO and CDC combined over the last year.

    Nicotra called Facebook’s move to ban links to Natural News “a very bold move, and something usually reserved for spammers.” He said he’s “happy” with Facebook’s major step to crack down on what he called a “serial misinformer,” while adding that more work needed to be done to keep users safe.

    “What’s needed is a major detox, a systemic solution to quarantine serial health misinformers. If they don’t, their lies and conspiracies could contaminate millions more and threaten the global response to Covid-19,” Nicotra said

    https://www.nbcnews.com/tech/tech-ne...ebook-n1218376
    “No matter how cynical I get, I just can't keep up.” – Lily Tomlin.




  12. #2667

    Re: covid-19 Virus Updates and Discussion

    Quote Originally Posted by mmmm8 View Post
    I'd love to understand how a 1% incidence of critical cases results in a 47% death rate among resolved cases. Are they keeping "mild cases" active for weeks and weeks and not "concluding" them as recovered? Or are they not so mild?
    Agree with you (in that I don't understand either). But, I would not believe the Swedes are cooking their stats. So maybe they are providing the "perfect" control group. Few restrictions and proper stats.
    Face it. It's the apocalypse.

  13. #2668

    Re: covid-19 Virus Updates and Discussion

    So Trump has just announced that the USA is withdrawing from the WHO. That'll show 'em. GH

  14. #2669

    Re: covid-19 Virus Updates and Discussion

    A rather lengthy report, so I'm just copying the intro.

    Across U.S., COVID-19 takes a hidden toll behind bars
    A REUTERS SPECIAL REPORT
    COVID-19 is spreading rapidly in U.S. jails and prisons, but testing of inmates and staff remains spotty and many confirmed cases are going unreported. The resulting lack of data has deep implications for the fight against the virus, because prison outbreaks can move easily to surrounding communities.
    Filed May 18, 2020, 11 a.m. GMT
    "And for my next fearless prediction..."

  15. #2670

    Re: covid-19 Virus Updates and Discussion

    Enough for today Enough for this week.
    “No matter how cynical I get, I just can't keep up.” – Lily Tomlin.




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