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  1. #151

    Re: Criminal Intent - The Senate Trial

    Don't you think most would have a tough time surviving a primary from the far right in such a situation? Not that they necessarily wouldn't, but it would be 50/50.
    Roger forever

  2. #152
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    Re: Criminal Intent - The Senate Trial

    Quote Originally Posted by GlennHarman View Post
    There simply are no Republican senators left with half a brain. GH
    They're afraid the bully on the playground will make a mean tweet about them.
    Oh Grigor. You silly man.

  3. #153

    Re: Criminal Intent - The Senate Trial

    “No matter how cynical I get, I just can't keep up.” – Lily Tomlin.




  4. #154

    Re: Criminal Intent - The Senate Trial

    Quote Originally Posted by suliso View Post
    Don't you think most would have a tough time surviving a primary from the far right in such a situation? Not that they necessarily wouldn't, but it would be 50/50.
    No. It's going to depend on the area, but Toomey in PA is too well funded. It would take someone with a high profile and personal wealth to have a successful run in the primary. In PA, you have to account for Philadelphia (which is a very expensive level 4 media market) and Pittsburgh (which is smaller than Philly, but still a sizable market). The worst place to run is a statewide race in NJ where you have to pay out the nose because it means ads in both the NYC and Philly markets, it's a killer.

    And also, I can't stress this enough though it should be obvious but apparently wasn't. They have to be somewhat sane and not unhinged, which doesn't seem to be the strong suit of the far right. There was a candidate who mostly fit the above criteria (wasn't high profile) and was fairly far right running for PA Governor in the last election, and he proceeded to publicly threaten physical violence against his opponent, the sitting PA Governor. Seriously.
    Last edited by JazzNU; 02-05-2020 at 02:21 PM.

  5. #155

    Re: Criminal Intent - The Senate Trial

    In Private, Republicans Admit They Acquitted Trump Out of Fear
    One journalist remarked to me, “How in the world can these senators walk around here upright when they have no backbone?”

    By Sherrod Brown
    Mr. Brown is a Democratic senator from Ohio.

    Feb. 5, 2020

    Not guilty. Not guilty.

    In the United States Senate, like in many spheres of life, fear does the business.

    Think back to the fall of 2002, just a few weeks before that year’s crucial midterm elections, when the Authorization for Use of Military Force Against Iraq was up for a vote. A year after the 9/11 attacks, hundreds of members of the House and the Senate were about to face the voters of a country still traumatized by terrorism.

    Senator Patty Murray, a thoughtful Democrat from Washington State, still remembers “the fear that dominated the Senate leading up to the Iraq war.”

    “You could feel it then,” she told me, “and you can feel that fear now” — chiefly among Senate Republicans.

    For those of us who, from the start, questioned the wisdom of the Iraq war, our sense of isolation surely wasn’t much different from the loneliness felt in the 1950s by Senator Herbert Lehman of New York, who confronted Joe McCarthy’s demagogy only to be abandoned by so many of his colleagues. Nor was it so different from what Senator George McGovern must have felt when he announced his early opposition to the Vietnam War and was then labeled a traitor by many inside and outside of Congress.

    History has indeed taught us that when it comes to the instincts that drive us, fear has no rival. As the lead House impeachment manager, Representative Adam Schiff, has noted, Robert Kennedy spoke of how “moral courage is a rarer commodity than bravery in battle.”

    Playing on that fear, the Senate majority leader, Mitch McConnell, sought a quick impeachment trial for President Trump with as little attention to it as possible. Reporters, who usually roam the Capitol freely, have been cordoned off like cattle in select areas. Mr. McConnell ordered limited camera views in the Senate chamber so only presenters — not absent senators — could be spotted.

    And barely a peep from Republican lawmakers.

    One journalist remarked to me, “How in the world can these senators walk around here upright when they have no backbone?”

    Fear has a way of bending us.

    Late in the evening on day four of the trial I saw it, just 10 feet across the aisle from my seat at Desk 88, when House Manager Adam Schiff told the Senate: “CBS News reported last night that a Trump confidant said that Republican senators were warned, ‘Vote against the president and your head will be on a pike.’” The response from Republicans was immediate and furious. Several Republican senators groaned and protested and muttered, “not true.” But pike or no pike, Mr. Schiff had clearly struck a nerve. (In the words of Lizzo: truth hurts.)

    Of course, the Republican senators who have covered for Mr. Trump love what he delivers for them. But Vice President Mike Pence would give them the same judges, the same tax cuts, the same attacks on workers’ rights and the environment. So that’s not really the reason for their united chorus of “not guilty.”

    For the stay-in-office-at-all-cost representatives and senators, fear is the motivator. They are afraid that Mr. Trump might give them a nickname like “Low Energy Jeb” and “Lyin’ Ted,” or that he might tweet about their disloyalty. Or — worst of all — that he might come to their state to campaign against them in the Republican primary. They worry:

    “Will the hosts on Fox attack me?”

    “Will the mouthpieces on talk radio go after me?”

    “Will the Twitter trolls turn their followers against me?”

    My colleagues know they all just might. There’s an old Russian proverb: The tallest blade of grass is the first cut by the scythe. In private, many of my colleagues agree that the president is reckless and unfit. They admit his lies. And they acknowledge what he did was wrong. They know this president has done things Richard Nixon never did. And they know that more damning evidence is likely to come out.

    So watching the mental contortions they perform to justify their votes is painful to behold: They claim that calling witnesses would have meant a never-ending trial. They tell us they’ve made up their minds, so why would we need new evidence? They say to convict this president now would lead to the impeachment of every future president — as if every president will try to sell our national security to the highest bidder.

    I have asked some of them, “If the Senate votes to acquit, what will you do to keep this president from getting worse?” Their responses have been shrugs and sheepish looks.

    They will not say that they are afraid. We all want to think that we always stand up for right and fight against wrong. But history does not look kindly on politicians who cannot fathom a fate worse than losing an upcoming election. They might claim fealty to their cause — those tax cuts — but often it’s a simple attachment to power that keeps them captured by fear.

    As Senator Murray said on the Senate floor in 2002, “we can act out of fear” or “we can stick to our principles.” Unfortunately, in this Senate, fear has had its way. In November, the American people will have theirs.

    Sherrod Brown (@SenSherrodBrown), a Democrat, is the senior United States senator from Ohio and is the author of “Desk 88: Eight Progressive Senators Who Changed America.”


    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/02/05/o...peachment.html
    “No matter how cynical I get, I just can't keep up.” – Lily Tomlin.




  6. #156

    Re: Criminal Intent - The Senate Trial

    Yamiche Alcindor
    @Yamiche

    WH statement on acquittal goes after Sen Romney:

    "The Senate voted to reject the baseless articles of impeachment, and only the President’s political opponents – all Democrats, and one failed Republican presidential candidate – voted for the manufactured impeachment articles."

    “No matter how cynical I get, I just can't keep up.” – Lily Tomlin.




  7. #157

    Re: Criminal Intent - The Senate Trial

    Chuck Schumer
    @SenSchumer
    ·
    31s
    Republican Senators denied the Senate's right to examine relevant evidence, to call witnesses and documents, to properly try the impeachment of President Trump.

    The verdict will be meaningless.

    This wasn't a trial by any stretch of the definition. The American people know it.

    http://<a href="https://twitter.com/...1729530880</a>
    “No matter how cynical I get, I just can't keep up.” – Lily Tomlin.




  8. #158

    Re: Criminal Intent - The Senate Trial

    Adam Klasfeld
    @KlasfeldReports

    Minutes after being acquitted of abusing his power, Trump reposts one of his favorite memes imagining himself as the United States' ruler for life, in defiance of term limits. https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/...992990721?s=20
    “No matter how cynical I get, I just can't keep up.” – Lily Tomlin.




  9. #159

    Re: Criminal Intent - The Senate Trial

    I have one question: if there was no trial how can there be an acquittal?
    “No matter how cynical I get, I just can't keep up.” – Lily Tomlin.




  10. #160

    Re: Criminal Intent - The Senate Trial

    Doug Jones just lost whatever minuscule change of reelection in Alabama - I do think that was a courageous vote in that sense. Manchin in W Va. has 4 years to recoup, and Trump will be ineligible to run for reelection (should he win reelection). Not sure what Arizona's vote might mean for Sinema, but McSally was never in doubt. Don't have a great sense about how this plays in Phoenix, but McSally and Mark Kelly should be a (unfortunately) tight race.

    Collins has given up her moderate label a while back. The biggest problem some of these politicians have is making it through the primaries, since the most vocal, stringent edges are the ones that tend to vote in large numbers in the primaries. And we have apparently reached a point in America where the term "moderate" is seen be the right and left as an obscenity of the first order.
    "And for my next fearless prediction..."

  11. #161

    Re: Criminal Intent - The Senate Trial

    I want to see how the way this administration's handling of the judicial processes will set precedents for the legal system in the USA.
    Subpoenas? Why obey them? The White House didn't.
    Trials with evidence and/or witnesses? No. The Senate decided on a legal issue without either.
    A really good lawyer could start using these tactics.
    Face it. It's the apocalypse.

  12. #162

    Re: Criminal Intent - The Senate Trial

    Quote Originally Posted by ponchi101 View Post
    I want to see how the way this administration's handling of the judicial processes will set precedents for the legal system in the USA.
    Subpoenas? Why obey them? The White House didn't.
    Trials with evidence and/or witnesses? No. The Senate decided on a legal issue without either.
    A really good lawyer could start using these tactics.
    I agree ponchi.
    “No matter how cynical I get, I just can't keep up.” – Lily Tomlin.




  13. #163

    Re: Criminal Intent - The Senate Trial

    Quote Originally Posted by ponchi101 View Post
    I want to see how the way this administration's handling of the judicial processes will set precedents for the legal system in the USA.
    Subpoenas? Why obey them? The White House didn't.
    Trials with evidence and/or witnesses? No. The Senate decided on a legal issue without either.
    A really good lawyer could start using these tactics.
    And get beaten easily and possibly found in contempt of court. This won't have any practical carryover.

    And in case people are not familiar with this wonderful part of American history. This is nothing new. There used to be "trials" like this regularly in the South with predetermined acquittals of obviously guilty people when whites were accused of harming and killing black people. Shocking to all of you I'm sure. Happy Black History Month!

  14. #164

    Re: Criminal Intent - The Senate Trial

    Sadly, JazzNU is completely right. And going forward, it certainly won't have any "practical carryover" for the common citizen.

    GH

  15. #165
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    Re: Criminal Intent - The Senate Trial

    At this point, there is ZERO reason to believe this Administration will respect presidential term limits. Hell, I wouldn't put it past them to eliminate term limits for the president but institute them for Democrats in the House and Senate. We're deep into "how low can we go?" territory. And these people have no compass.
    Winston, a.k.a. Alvena Rae Risley Hiatt (1944-2019), RIP

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