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  1. #1

    Criminal Intent - The Senate Trial

    Thanks skatingfan for putting me on the right track.
    Criminal Intent was always my favorite one of them all.
    “No matter how cynical I get, I just can't keep up.” – Lily Tomlin.




  2. #2

    Re: Criminal Intent - The Senate Trial

    Simon Rosenberg
    @SimonWDC
    Replying to
    @SimonWDC
    and
    @GENmag
    Worth repeating that Attorney General Barr has known for weeks/months about the evidence and testimony Parnas would provide, and chose to keep it from Congress.

    It's why Barr must resign. He wasn't just part of the cover up - he's been its architect.


    Kyle Griffin
    @kylegriffin1
    Lev Parnas to
    @maddow
    : "President Trump knew exactly what was going on. He was aware of all my movements. I wouldn't do anything without the consent of Rudy Giuliani, or the President."
    “No matter how cynical I get, I just can't keep up.” – Lily Tomlin.




  3. #3

    Re: Criminal Intent - The Senate Trial

    Molly McKew
    @MollyMcKew
    What guys like Sater, Akhmetshin, Kilimnik, Parnas know best is how to play people by claiming they have information that is unique & critical. They use it to buy access, stir crisis, layer narrative.

    When they get unfettered access to our media, they know how to use subversion.


    Heidi Cuda
    @Heidi_Cuda

    Replying to @MollyMcKew
    We must always view every breaker with “how does this benefit Putin.” Our media gets played over and over again.
    “No matter how cynical I get, I just can't keep up.” – Lily Tomlin.




  4. #4

    Re: Criminal Intent - The Senate Trial

    There's been another release of Parnas material. A lot of it has to be translated.


    Adam Klasfeld
    @KlasfeldReports

    Stunner from the latest doc release:

    This appears to be Lev Parnas transmitting The Hill’s John Solomon’s pitch and questions to Yuriy Lutsenko, dated shortly before the editorials smearing Ambassador Yovanovich.

    “No matter how cynical I get, I just can't keep up.” – Lily Tomlin.




  5. #5

    Re: Criminal Intent - The Senate Trial

    emptywheel @emptywheel

    I was wondering whether Rudy and Lev had anything interesting to say abt Stone's arrest. The entire page after this is redacted.



    Lev, however, is focused on Derek Harvey stuff (remember he went with Nunes on his Parnas boondoggle).

    Rudy however is quite happy that Mark Penn -- Mark Penn!! -- was upset about Stone's arrest.

    “No matter how cynical I get, I just can't keep up.” – Lily Tomlin.




  6. #6

    Re: Criminal Intent - The Senate Trial

    Quote Originally Posted by Ti-Amie View Post
    Thanks skatingfan for putting me on the right track.
    Criminal Intent was always my favorite one of them all.

  7. #7

    Re: Criminal Intent - The Senate Trial

    To be honest, by now I really can't keep track of which corrupt and vile act Tiny et al have done we are talking about.
    Face it. It's the apocalypse.

  8. #8

    Re: Criminal Intent - The Senate Trial

    Rachel spread Lev's interview over two nights. Last night was part one.

    I found him well coached by his lawyer and credible on everything she asked last night EXCEPT when it came to Ambassador Yovanovitch. It was hard for him to dance around that one and it stood out from the rest of the interview.
    “No matter how cynical I get, I just can't keep up.” – Lily Tomlin.




  9. #9

    Re: Criminal Intent - The Senate Trial

    Ukraine Is Investigating Whether Marie Yovanovitch Was Under Surveillance By Rudy Giuliani's Associates
    “Ukraine cannot ignore such illegal activities on its territory,” an official from the country's interior ministry said.

    Christopher Miller
    BuzzFeed Contributor
    Map of Kyiv, Ukraine
    Reporting From

    Kyiv, Ukraine

    Last updated on January 16, 2020, at 8:39 a.m. ET

    Posted on January 16, 2020, at 7:58 a.m. ET

    KYIV — Ukrainian authorities said Thursday they had opened a criminal investigation into whether former US ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch was under surveillance by associates of Rudy Giuliani while in Kyiv last spring.

    Officials from Ukraine’s interior ministry announced the investigation in a televised briefing, citing a trove of documents released by House Democrats on Tuesday that included several cryptic WhatsApp messages between Lev Parnas and Robert Hyde that discussed monitoring Yovanovitch’s physical movements and electronic devices.

    “Ukraine’s position is to not interfere in the domestic affairs of the United States,” an interior ministry official said. “However, the published records contain the fact of a possible violation of the legislation of Ukraine and the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations, which protects the rights of a diplomat on the territory of another country.

    “Ukraine cannot ignore such illegal activities on its territory."

    The WhatsApp messages in question were sent last March and turned over this week to House Democrats as part of the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump. Three House committees sent the evidence to the House Judiciary Committee on Tuesday “to be included as part of the official record that will be transmitted to the Senate along with the Articles of Impeachment.” The House sent the articles to the Senate on Wednesday evening.

    In the texts between the men, Hyde calls Yovanovitch a “bitch” and suggests he’s in touch with people in Ukraine who were actively watching the ambassador.

    “They are willing to help if we/you would like a price,” reads one message to Parnas from Hyde, an avid Trump supporter and a landscaper who is running for a House seat in Connecticut. Hyde followed that by saying: “Guess you can do anything in the Ukraine with money… what I was told.”

    It’s unclear exactly who, if anyone, was monitoring Yovanovitch at the time. Hyde couldn’t be immediately reached for comment, but he tweeted on Tuesday that he had never been to Kyiv.

    Yovanovitch told BuzzFeed News through her attorney late Tuesday that “the notion that American citizens and others were monitoring Ambassador Yovanovitch’s movements for unknown purposes is disturbing. We trust that the appropriate authorities will conduct an investigation to determine what happened.”

    [IMG]https://img.buzzfeed.com/buzzfeed-static/static/2020-01/16/13/asset/e7942251ed3f/sub-buzz-2145-1579181847-8.png?downsize=800:*&output-format=auto&output-quality=auto[/IMG]

    The US Embassy in Kyiv directed questions on the matter to the State Department, which didn’t respond to BuzzFeed News’ request for comment and hasn’t publicly commented since the texts became public.

    Trump’s associates, specifically Giuliani, had been openly critical of Yovanovitch last spring and were actively campaigning to get her removed. Giuliani had claimed without evidence that Yovanovitch, a career foreign service officer and two-time ambassador who served both Republican and Democrat presidents, was speaking poorly of Trump in public and behind closed doors.

    Parnas is a key associate of Giuliani, a lawyer working for Trump who ran the back-channel campaign in Ukraine that is at the heart of the president’s impeachment.

    In an interview with MSNBC host Rachel Maddow on Wednesday, Parnas said that President Trump was aware of the work he was doing for Giuliani.

    "He was aware of all my movements. I wouldn't do anything without the consent of Rudy Giuliani or the president," said Parnas, who was indicted on campaign finance charges.

    Ukraine’s interior ministry said its goal “is to investigate whether there were any violations of Ukrainian and international laws” or “if it was just bravado and fake conversation between two US citizens.”

    The ministry also said it had requested information from the FBI “about persons who may be involved in this possible criminal offense,” and added that Interior Minister Arsen Avakov wants the US side to take part in the investigation.



    Asked about his own texts with Parnas last March that were also released in the trove by House Democrats and that suggested he provided Parnas with a security detail while he was in Kyiv, Avakov declined to answer.

    “No comments,” he said through a spokesperson.

    https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article...ie-yovanovitch
    “No matter how cynical I get, I just can't keep up.” – Lily Tomlin.




  10. #10
    Director of Nothing
    Forum Moderator

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    Re: Criminal Intent - The Senate Trial

    About the image up above.

    1. Parnas' written Russian is pretty horrible for a native speaker (granted, he immigrated at age 3, but using commas is not even language-specific.
    2. He's corresponding with a government minister in a very informal tone (the minister is answering in very brief sentences) and asking for security detail as if he's reaching out to some buddy at a small security firm.


  11. #11

    Re: Criminal Intent - The Senate Trial

    Steven Dennis
    @StevenTDennis

    Press restrictions outside Senate chamber are in effect. We have two pens where we can stand and interview senators if they choose to come over and chat.

    Brian Schatz
    @brianschatz
    Every Senator will take this oath. “I solemnly swear that in all things appertaining to the trial of President Donald John Trump, now pending, I will do impartial justice according to the Constitution and laws, so help me God.”
    “No matter how cynical I get, I just can't keep up.” – Lily Tomlin.




  12. #12

    Re: Criminal Intent - The Senate Trial

    Impeachment trial live updates: Historic impeachment trial of Trump begins in the Senate with House prosecutors reading charges against the president

    By
    John Wagner and
    Felicia Sonmez
    Jan. 16, 2020 at 1:53 p.m. EST

    The historic impeachment trial of President Trump got underway Thursday with the arrival in the Senate of the seven House managers to formally present the two charges of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

    John G. Roberts Jr., chief justice of the United States, is headed to the Senate later Thursday, where he is expected to be sworn in to preside over the trial focused on the president’s conduct toward Ukraine. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) has said the trial will get underway “in earnest” next week.

    Fallout also continued Thursday from new allegations by Lev Parnas, a former associate of Trump’s personal lawyer Rudolph W. Giuliani, that Trump knew of his efforts to dig up dirt in Ukraine that could benefit Trump politically. The impeachment charges — abuse of power and obstruction of Congress — center on the allegation that Trump withheld military aid and a White House meeting to pressure Ukraine to investigate his political rivals, including former vice president Joe Biden.

    12:06 p.m.
    Historic impeachment trial of Trump begins in the Senate

    The seven House impeachment managers, who had delivered the articles Wednesday night, arrived at the Senate chamber shortly after noon Thursday to formally present the two charges of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress against Trump.

    Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam B. Schiff (D-Calif.), one of the House managers, was expected to detail the charges for members of the Senate, who will be sworn in as jurors later Thursday by Roberts.

    McConnell has said the trial will begin in earnest on Tuesday after the holiday weekend.

    The arrival of the House managers closely followed a Senate vote to approve a sweeping economic pact between the United States, Canada and Mexico on Thursday, delivering on Trump’s promise of a new North American trade deal.

    The vote was 89 to 10 as an overwhelming majority of senators of both parties supported the agreement, as expected.

    By John Wagner and Erica Werner

    12:20 p.m.
    Schiff outlines charges against Trump

    House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam B. Schiff (D-Calif.), the lead impeachment manager, presented the articles and detailed the two charges against Trump — abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

    The impeachment articles are formally known as House Resolution 755, “Impeaching Donald John Trump, President of the United States, for High Crimes and Misdemeanors.”

    “President Trump thus warrants impeachment and trial, removal from office and disqualification to hold and enjoy any office of honor, trust or profit under the United States,” Schiff said as he finished reading from the articles.

    Before his remarks, senators were admonished to remain silent upon “pain of imprisonment” by the Senate sergeant at arms.

    As Schiff spoke for 20 minutes, all of the senators present sat at their desks.

    Some pulled out pen and paper and took notes, including Sens. Rob Portman (R-Ohio), Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio), Robert P. Casey Jr. (D-Pa.) and Amy Klobuchar (D-Minn.). Others sat expressionless, including McConnell (R-Ky.) and Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.).

    At the midway point, Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) pulled out a yellow legal pad and jotted down some notes. Sen. Jack Reed (D-R.I.) folded his arms on his desk the entire speech, almost as if in prayer.

    The other six House Democratic managers stood off to the Democratic side of the chamber — which is the designated spot for managers during an impeachment trial, regardless of party affiliation — holding their own copies of the articles of impeachment.

    Just after 12:20 p.m., as Schiff finished, the managers lined up and departed back to the House, not set to return until next week when the actual prosecution of their case begins.

    By Felicia Sonmez and Paul Kane

    12:25 p.m.
    Four senators named to escort Roberts

    A bipartisan group of four senators — Roy Blunt (R-Mo.), Patrick J. Leahy (D-Vt.), Lindsey O. Graham (R-S.C.) and Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) — were named to escort the chief justice to the Senate chamber at 2 p.m.

    Upon his arrival, he is expected to be sworn in to preside over the trial and will then swear in members of the Senate to serve as jurors.

    The chamber is in recess until 2 p.m.

    12:50 p.m.
    Republicans downplay findings of GAO on withholding Ukraine aid

    Republicans sought to downplay the importance of a Government Accountability Office report Thursday that found that the White House violated federal law when it held on to security aid to Ukraine last year

    Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) noted to reporters that the military aid to Ukraine was ultimately delivered before the end of the fiscal year, Sept. 30 — though only after news of the hold became public.

    “Eh, I don’t know. I mean, I think that the president has the right to move money around, and all the presidents have worked within this realm,” he said. “But none of that really rises to anything even remotely close to something to impeach somebody over.”

    Sen. Richard C. Shelby (R-Ala.), chairman of the Appropriations Committee, turned the finger around at the GAO and accused them of meddling in impeachment.

    “I don’t recall that somebody at GAO has ever said, ‘So and so has broken the law, and this and that,’ ” Shelby said. “They’re becoming like they’re trying to influence what we’re doing. I think they shouldn’t get into that.”

    Asked whether he was accusing a nonpartisan entity of becoming partisan, he added: “I think they shouldn’t be deciding who broke the law.”

    Sen. John Cornyn (R-Tex.) tried to separate Trump from the GAO’s findings, arguing that “obviously it is not directed at the president; it’s the Office of Management and Budget, with whom I’ve had a few disagreements over the years about the withholding of money that’s been appropriated by Congress.”

    When a reporter told Cornyn that multiple current and former Trump officials have testified that the hold was at the direction of the president, he continued to demur: “The GAO report identifies the OMB, not the president, and it says it was for ‘policy reasons,’ not for political reasons. … I don’t think that changes anything.”

    By Rachael Bade

    1:45 p.m.
    Only 99 senators will be present for swearing-in

    Only 99 senators will be sworn in Thursday.

    Sen. James M. Inhofe (R-Okla.) is in Oklahoma to be with a family member facing a medical issue, a spokeswoman said.

    Inhofe plans to return to Washington on Tuesday, when he will be sworn in with no delay to the impeachment process, the spokeswoman said.

    By Seung Min Kim
    “No matter how cynical I get, I just can't keep up.” – Lily Tomlin.




  13. #13

    Re: Criminal Intent - The Senate Trial

    Megan Mineiro
    @MMineiro_CNS

    Chief Justice Roberts now on the Senate floor and just administered this oath to senators to serve as jurors in the impeachment trial. All 100 now filing up to sign and make it official.
    @CourthouseNews

    “No matter how cynical I get, I just can't keep up.” – Lily Tomlin.




  14. #14

    Re: Criminal Intent - The Senate Trial

    Kyle Griffin
    @kylegriffin1

    Chief Justice John Roberts swears in senators as jurors for the impeachment trial. Via CBS
    https://twitter.com/i/status/1217889432424144899
    “No matter how cynical I get, I just can't keep up.” – Lily Tomlin.




  15. #15

    Re: Criminal Intent - The Senate Trial

    WaPo updates continued (2)

    2:10 p.m.
    Roberts takes the oath, swears in senators

    Roberts entered the Senate chamber and was sworn in by Sen. Charles E. Grassley (R-Iowa), the presiding senator.

    “Senators, I attend the Senate in conformity of your notice for the purpose of joining with you for the trial of the president of the United States,” Roberts said as he took his place on the dais. “I am now prepared to take the oath.”

    Grassley then instructed Roberts to place his left hand on a Bible and administered the oath.

    “Do you solemnly swear that in all things appertaining to the trial of the impeachment of Donald John Trump, president of the United States, now pending, you will do impartial justice according to the Constitution and laws, so help you God?” Grassley asked.

    “I do,” Roberts responded.

    The chief justice then swore in all of the senators in unison. Twenty-five groups of four senators each will now proceed to sign an “oath book” at the front of the chamber.

    By Felicia Sonmez

    2:35 p.m.
    Senate adjourns until Jan. 21

    After all 99 senators present signed the oath book, Senate Sergeant at Arms Michael Stenger rose to read a proclamation.

    “Hear ye, hear ye, hear ye, all persons are commanded to keep silent on pain of imprisonment while the House of Representatives is exhibiting to the Senate of the United States articles of impeachment against Donald John Trump, president of the United States,” he said.

    McConnell read several unanimous consent requests related to the trial. The Senate then adjourned until Tuesday, Jan. 21 at 1 p.m., when the trial will begin in earnest.

    By Felicia Sonmez
    “No matter how cynical I get, I just can't keep up.” – Lily Tomlin.




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