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  1. #601
    4.0 NTRP and falling ponchi101's Avatar
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    Re: The Run to the WH

    I would say Dems vote less than GOP's, because it is really hard to herd cats.
    I have friends in Colorado that did not bother. So, when the GOP takes back the state and arrests you for growing weed in the back yard, don't say voting doesn't make a difference.
    Last edited by ponchi101; 11-01-2019 at 06:48 PM.
    Missing winter...

  2. #602

    Re: The Run to the WH

    Beto O’Rourke quits presidential race amid financial strains and lagging popularity

    By Matt Viser
    November 1, 2019 at 6:25 p.m. EDT

    Beto O’Rourke, the former congressman from Texas who burst to the national scene wielding excitement and enthusiasm, on Friday abruptly dropped out of the Democratic presidential race amid financial strains and a lagging campaign.

    Two people close to him said that he would not run for U.S. Senate in Texas — as some had pressured him to do — leaving his future political plans in doubt.

    “Though it is difficult to accept, it is clear to me now that this campaign does not have the means to move forward successfully,” O’Rourke wrote in a Medium post published Friday afternoon. “My service to the country will not be as a candidate or as the nominee.”

    The move marked yet another sign of the dwindling of the Democratic primary field, one that is being reshaped by a handful of top candidates who have the financial resources to mount a campaign that could stretch deep into next year.

    O’Rourke entered the race in March, causing an initial stir when Oprah Winfrey touted his candidacy and Vanity Fair featured him in a cover article. He met with President Barack Obama, who saw in O’Rourke some of the same hopeful political style that he rode to the White House. A documentary film about him premiered earlier this year at the South by Southwest festival.

    The attention stemmed from his long-shot race against Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Tex.) in 2018, in which he turned a number of viral moments and a massive fundraising haul into a narrow defeat — one that signaled his promise in a red state.

    But he was not able to duplicate in the presidential contest the fundraising and campaigning prowess he demonstrated in that race.

    He attracted top political talent — Jennifer O’Malley Dillon, one of the most sought-after Democratic consultants, was his campaign manager — and he had one of the best fundraising hauls for his first day as a presidential candidate.

    But his spontaneity — jumping on countertops, driving his own car, and treks off the beaten political path — never fully translated into a meaningful presidential campaign for voters. He struggled in debates, switched his themes and focuses often, and was uncomfortable with criticizing fellow Democrats.

    He was also struggling to meet the polling threshold to make the stage in the next debate.

    “I decided to run for President because I believed that I could help bring a divided country together in common cause to confront the greatest set of challenges we’ve ever faced,” O’Rourke wrote in his blog post. “I also knew that the most fundamental of them is fear — the fear that Donald Trump wants us to feel about one another; the very real fear that too many in this country live under; and the fear we sometimes feel when it comes to doing the right thing, especially when it runs counter to what is politically convenient or popular.”

    O’Rourke briefly stopped his campaign in August, after a mass shooting in his native El Paso. When he returned to the campaign trail, he reoriented his focus on gun control. He took bold stands — calling for a mandatory gun buyback program — that earned admiration from some Democrats and derision from Republicans.

    Trump quickly mocked O’Rourke on Twitter as Friday’s announcement emerged.

    “Oh no, Beto just dropped out of race for President despite him saying he was “born for this.” I don’t think so!” Trump wrote, in a reference to O’Rourke’s quote in Vanity Fair that he was “born to be in it.”

    Texas Democratic Party Chair Gilberto Hinojosa called O’Rourke “a fighter, advocate, and leader.”

    “In the wake of the El Paso shootings, he made the entire country proud as he focused his campaign on ending gun violence and the rise of white supremacy,” he said in a statement. “Beto O’Rourke has done amazing things for the Democratic Party in Texas, and we look forward to his future.”

    Steve Ortega, who once served on the El Paso city council with O’Rourke, said that he learned that his close friend had dropped out of the race when reporters called him on Friday evening.

    “I’m proud of him. I’m proud of the race he ran. . . . Part of his charm is what hurt him in a race like this. He’s not testing and polling everything he says. He speaks from his heart. . . . He shot from the hip and wasn’t running the traditional campaign with the canned lines,” Ortega said. He said that while O’Rourke focused on immigration and gun control, voters in key states might have wanted to hear about other issues.

    “I’m glad that he ran, being from El Paso, because he brought a needed voice to border issues and gun control issues.”

    The news of O’Rourke’s decision slowly arrived at a rally he had planned Friday on the riverfront in Des Moines. Tickets were still being distributed at an entrance, and some supporters expressed disbelief at the news, asking to be shown some proof.

    Volunteers, some of whom who had woken up early to decorate a park and line the road with signs hugged each other, wept, and sometimes screamed expletives.

    “I saw him in Sioux Center, the reddest place in Iowa,” said Tammy Growth, a 48-year-old pastor. “His willingness to listen to everyone is what attracted me to listen to him.”

    Ryan Holliday, 40, who had traveled from Galveston, Tex., groused that “the knives came out in the media” for O’Rourke, and said he was hurt because he didn’t have years to plan a campaign like some candidates who outlasted him.

    “It’s so disappointing that he did this before Super Tuesday,” Holliday said. “We have all these new voters coming out and we needed him to come to Texas.”

    Jenna Johnson and David Weigel contributed reporting.


    https://www.washingtonpost.com/polit...e01_story.html
    There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life.

    ― Frank Zappa





  3. #603
    4.0 NTRP and falling ponchi101's Avatar
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    Re: The Run to the WH

    Who gets his followers? Bernie?
    Missing winter...

  4. #604
    Contests Woody's Avatar
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    Re: The Run to the WH

    Quote Originally Posted by ponchi101 View Post
    Who gets his followers? Bernie?
    Bernie gets 7 of them, Liz gets the other 4.

    Beto.jpg
    Last edited by Woody; 11-02-2019 at 11:07 AM.

  5. #605

    Re: The Run to the WH

    Edward Hardy
    @EdwardTHardy

    If Donald Trump is so confident that he has a high approval rating within the Republican Party, as he has repeatedly bragged, why is the GOP rigging its presidential primary and making it impossible for any of his challengers to have a chance against him?
    There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life.

    ― Frank Zappa





  6. #606

    Re: The Run to the WH

    Judd Legum
    @JuddLegum

    New Trump Facebook ad encourages people to say "THANK YOU VETERANS" by donating to... the Trump campaign



    Note the "date" of Veterans Day
    There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life.

    ― Frank Zappa





  7. #607
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    Re: The Run to the WH

    So, the LA Times national reporter Evan Halper quoted Mayor Pete last night as saying "failures of the Obama era" and after it went viral, re-checked the tapes and corrected himself. Mayor Pete actually said "failures of the old normal."

    Yeesh...

  8. #608

    Re: The Run to the WH

    Quote Originally Posted by shtexas View Post
    So, the LA Times national reporter Evan Halper quoted Mayor Pete last night as saying "failures of the Obama era" and after it went viral, re-checked the tapes and corrected himself. Mayor Pete actually said "failures of the old normal."

    Yeesh...
    This WaPo opinion piece points out how, once again, the MSM is failing US citizens. I was going to put it in the mpeachment thread but it really should be here.

    An epic ‘Meet the Press’ rant unmasks the real goal of Trump’s lies

    By
    Greg Sargent
    Opinion writer
    November 11, 2019 at 10:03 a.m. EST

    The public phase of the impeachment inquiry is set to begin this week, and it will shock you to learn that House Republicans are pushing for it to include testimony from numerous people who are not in a position to shed any light whatsoever on President Trump’s conduct.

    Republicans want to question Joe Biden’s son Hunter and other figures at the center of a nexus of conspiracy theories and lies that Trump and his propagandists have long employed to misdirect Americans away from Trump’s own bottomless corruption.

    A remarkable and important series of exchanges on “Meet the Press” — including an epic rant from a Democrat about our media’s both-sidesing tendencies — demonstrates the true nature of the game plan we’re about to see from Trump and Republicans.

    It all started when Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) offered a spectacularly disingenuous new defense of Trump’s corruption. First, Paul claimed Trump was right to withhold military aid from Ukraine, because Trump truly believed that Biden was, in fact, corrupt.

    Then Paul insisted that in pressuring Ukraine to undertake “investigations” of Biden, Trump was doing the same thing Biden did when he withheld aid to oust a Ukrainian prosecutor. Trump’s propagandists have twisted that act into a tale of Biden-and-son corruption that is entirely fabricated. Trump extorted Ukraine to force it to somehow make that fabrication true.

    Finally, Paul did concede Trump pressured a foreign country to investigate a political rival, but added that Hillary Clinton “hired a British spy to hire Russians to get dirt called the Steele Dossier,” and equated that with Trump’s conduct.

    NBC News’s Chuck Todd seemed to allow Paul’s basic framing to stand unchallenged, saying at one point: “So two wrongs make a right?” That prompted this remarkable pushback from Rep. Jim Himes (D-Conn.), which you should watch in full:

    Jesse Lee
    @JesseCharlesLee
    @RandPaul
    tries to “both sides” Trump and Biden, Chuck Todd nods along, and
    @jahimes just burns it all down.

    https://twitter.com/i/status/1193560237061660673

    The core distinction here is between shaping foreign policy around some conception of what’s in the national interest (withholding U.S. aid to get Ukraine to battle generic corruption) and perverting foreign policy to serve Trump’s political interests (withholding aid to extort Ukraine into helping absolve Russia of 2016 electoral sabotage on Trump’s behalf and to smear a 2020 opponent).

    Paul laughably tried to reconcile these things by arguing that, since Biden actually was corrupt, in withholding aid Trump was acting in the national interest, as if the fact that Biden is a 2020 rival is pure coincidence. But Biden wasn’t actually corrupt, and Trump was subverting the national interest to his own.

    What Biden did in Ukraine

    Fortuitously, the New York Times has a deeply reported look at what Biden really did in Ukraine during those years as vice president. Biden was carrying out U.S. foreign policy by prodding Ukraine — awash in civil unrest and corruption, getting plundered by oligarchs and under Russian assault — to undertake reforms to bring it in line with Western democratic ideals, as a bulwark against Russia.

    This is the important subplot lurking beneath the scandal headlines — that in leaving Ukraine vulnerable to Russia in order to strong-arm Ukraine into carrying out his own self-interested corrupt designs, Trump retreated from the United States’ posture of siding with Ukraine in a broader battle between liberal democracy and illiberal authoritarian kleptocracy.

    As Franklin Foer has shown, Biden was trying to pull Ukraine into a more democratic orbit, and Trump in effect pulled in the other direction, mingling his own corruption with Russian geopolitical interests.

    Importantly, the diplomats horrified by Trump’s misconduct have also testified to this broader story. As Ambassador William B. Taylor Jr. suggested, Trump betrayed a “democratic neighbor” that is “eager to join Western institutions and enjoy a more secure and prosperous life.”

    Thus, the ouster of a Ukrainian prosecutor that Biden sought was in keeping with U.S. policy and broadly supported by numerous international institutions. What’s more, that prosecutor was failing to investigate corruption, and wasn’t even investigating Burisma (Hunter Biden’s company).


    It’s legitimate to raise questions about what Hunter Biden’s Burisma work shows about the propriety of profiting off proximity to power. But this doesn’t alter our understanding of what Joe Biden actually was doing in Ukraine, which — unlike Trump’s conduct — was shaped around the national interest.

    As for the comparison to Hillary Clinton’s supposed collusion and hiring of a spy, all that is based on wild exaggerations and fabrications as well. Naturally, the other witnesses Republicans want to call are supposed to shed (fake) light on that story.

    How Trump’s propaganda works

    This episode on “Meet the Press” illustrates in a back-door way what the real aim of pro-Trump propaganda is, and how it will be employed in the inquiry’s public phase.

    Remember, it was a longtime imperative for Trump and lawyer Rudolph Giuliani to get Ukraine to issue a public statement confirming sham investigations that would rewrite the story of 2016 and help rig 2020 for Trump. This scandal is all about disinformation — about getting news organizations to treat disinformation seriously, to create a miasma of doubt around Russia’s 2016 sabotage and an aura of corruption around Biden.

    Indeed, as former Trump adviser Stephen K. Bannon has admitted, the way to create this sort of aura is to get the mainstream media to cover such allegations, no matter how discredited, to introduce them into the mainstream discussion and get them treated as representing one side of a good-faith political dialogue.

    That’s the obvious goal behind getting the impeachment inquiry to include public testimony from people like Hunter Biden. And along those lines, this “Meet the Press” episode is a cautionary tale. It shows what it looks like when a bad-faith actor — Paul — floats this kind of disinformation and succeeds in getting it treated far too respectfully.



    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opini...l-trumps-lies/
    There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life.

    ― Frank Zappa





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