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  1. #1321

    Re: The Run to the WH

    You are about to enter another dimension, a dimension not only of sight and sound but of mind. A journey into a wondrous land of imagination. Next stop, the Twilight Zone!
    I just quoted George Will.
    “No matter how cynical I get, I just can't keep up.” – Lily Tomlin.




  2. #1322

    Re: The Run to the WH

    Gina Raimondo sounds like a great choice for VP also. But name recognition is not high on a national level. Also, being from Rhode Island, picking her probably doesn't help him win.

    There really are no bad choices on that list. Whomever he picks, let's just hope we all get to see what kind of VP she will be. GH

  3. #1323

    Re: The Run to the WH

    Quote Originally Posted by GlennHarman View Post
    Whomever he picks, let's just hope we all get to see what kind of VP she will be. GH
    But do we really see that? VP mostly do nothing as prescribed by US constitution.
    Roger forever

  4. #1324

    Re: The Run to the WH

    Quote Originally Posted by suliso View Post
    But do we really see that? VP mostly do nothing as prescribed by US constitution.
    Since Biden has indicated he wants to groom his VP as his successor, I wouldn't think she'd do nothing. Yes, the VP doesn't have to do many things, but that doesn't mean she wouldn't.
    Go Pack Go!

  5. #1325

    Re: The Run to the WH

    Quote Originally Posted by Ti-Amie View Post
    This is the vice president who would restore adult supervision in Washington
    By
    George F. Will
    Columnist
    May 22, 2020 at 7:00 a.m. EDT
    The smallest state has the smallest governor. Rhode Island’s Gina Raimondo is almost 5 feet 3 inches, about an inch shorter than James Madison. What was said of him is true of her: There is a high ratio of mind to mass. Unfortunately, a perversity of today’s political culture is that those with the most time and inclination for full-time self-promotion, such as U.S. senators, eclipse those, such as governors, who are preoccupied with serious responsibilities.

    After Harvard (where she played rugby), Oxford (she was a Rhodes Scholar) and Yale Law School, she was an early recruit to a venture capital company whose premise was, she says, that “you could find talent all over the country,” not just in hotbeds such as Austin and Silicon Valley. Then she founded an affiliated fund specializing in health care. “My mother actually started crying” when, in 2010, Raimondo ran to be treasurer of the state with the nation’s highest per capita unfunded pension debt.

    Pensions, which soon would have swallowed 20 percent of state revenue, were threatening to starve social services. Including the Providence Public Library, where Raimondo’s grandfather, who, arriving from Italy at 14 with little education and less English, studied to improve his chances. As state treasurer, she told “crowded, angry union halls” that cities and towns might go bankrupt and that promised pensions would disappear. Her reforms — pausing cost-of-living increases, raising the retirement age and the ratio of defined contribution to defined benefit plans — passed Rhode Island’s House 57-15 and the Senate 35-2.

    When she ran for governor, Rhode Island had the nation’s highest unemployment rate. The state had been the nation’s — arguably, the world’s — jewelry workshop, until much of the manufacturing decamped to China. The exodus included the Bulova watch company, which had employed 1,000, including her father, who became unemployed at 56. She wears a Bulova on her wrist but says that the main reason she ran for governor was that previous administrations had not repositioned Rhode Island for a changed world. She has done this by entrepreneurial federalism — making the state attractive to business, including the nation’s first offshore wind farm.

    Raimondo has cut taxes every year and removed 8,000 pages of regulations — 30 percent of the state’s regulations. Economic dynamism has enabled her to raise the state minimum wage to $11.50, create a sick leave entitlement and finance the largest infrastructure program in the state’s history. Thanks to the G.I. Bill, her father, the son of a meat cutter, became the first in the family to go to college, and his daughter has delivered tuition-free community college.

    Partnering with CVS, the nation’s largest pharmacy chain, headquartered in Woonsocket, her state has achieved one of the nation’s highest per capita levels of testing for covid-19. Her approval rating has soared during the pandemic. An anxious nation longing for competence in the national government might turn its lonely eyes to her, if it knew of her.

    There often is, however, a disproportion in the allocation of media attention to political figures: an inverse relationship between a political person’s substantive achievements and the froth of publicity surrounding her or him. The Senate, the incubator of presidential aspirations, is an arena for the gesture politics of virtue signaling. It encourages the misapprehension that striking poses solves problems, and it develops no skills germane to the executive tasks of managing vast organizations and applying aspirational statutes to recalcitrant reality.

    Joe Biden’s choice of a running mate will matter to the electorate’s large moderate majority more than such choices usually do, for two reasons. Biden will be 78 on Jan. 20, 2021. And his choice will indicate whether the trajectory of the world’s oldest party will be determined by its left-wing minority that strenuously opposed his nomination, or by the party’s temperate majority, which produced the Democrats’ 2018 success.

    The Democratic left, with its addiction to indignation and its aversion to practical politics, might recoil from Raimondo because she understands the enormous financial sector of a nation now chin-deep in red ink. And because she had the impertinence to persuade crucial Democratic constituencies — public employees unions, including those of teachers — to support difficult choices. After defeating a left-wing primary challenger by 24 points, she was resoundingly reelected in one of the nation’s bluest states, and then became chair of the Democratic Governors Association.


    A Biden-Raimondo ticket would achieve the left’s primary goal, the removal of Donald Trump. And the resulting administration would restore adult supervision in Washington.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opini...35f_story.html
    A nice story about a governor that I know virtually nothing about and had heard nothing about until now. This, the size of the state, the area of the country (NE) and the fact that she is from a state that will vote D for President all argue against why she would be chosen.
    "And for my next fearless prediction..."

  6. #1326

    Re: The Run to the WH

    John K Stahl
    @JohnKStahlUSA
    · 18h
    After Joe’s racist comments yesterday, do you think that helps or hurts Shamu’s chances of getting the VP slot? They have to shore up the base and I don’t think Pocahontas can do it. Is Willie’s Ho back in contention? #maga #tcot #kag
    Jemele Hill
    @jemelehill·3m
    Reminder: This is the same Republican Party that has spent the last three days telling black folks that we’re stupid and brainwashed for supporting Joe Biden, and the Democratic Party. They believe this is a better alternative.
    “No matter how cynical I get, I just can't keep up.” – Lily Tomlin.




  7. #1327

    Re: The Run to the WH

    I am sorry I have to ask, because it will be offensive.
    I know who Pocahontas is. Who are Shamu and Willie's Ho? Stacey Abrahams and Kamala?
    Face it. It's the apocalypse.

  8. #1328

    Re: The Run to the WH

    Quote Originally Posted by ponchi101 View Post
    I am sorry I have to ask, because it will be offensive.
    I know who Pocahontas is. Who are Shamu and Willie's Ho? Stacey Abrahams and Kamala?


    You win!
    “No matter how cynical I get, I just can't keep up.” – Lily Tomlin.




  9. #1329

    Re: The Run to the WH

    I am completely aware that Biden should not have said what he did. But I can't help but being reminded of something I said MANY times starting in the mid-1980's. Of course, I was a gay man talking to other gay men. The wording was different, but the meaning was not really all that far from what he said, something like: How can you be gay and even consider voting for the Republican candidate?

    Of course, I was in the process of losing a partner to AIDS who may not have died with faster government intervention. So I was bitter for very personal reasons. But if you recall all of the horrible things the Republicans were saying about people with AIDS, the absolute lack of concern in terms of more spending on research, etc., not to mention how demonized we were over the subject of same-sex marriage, then you can see why I felt that way.

    So Biden was absolutely the wrong person to say what he did. But I hope that ethnic minorities can put this behind them and realized the difference between the parties.

    By the way, I still know gay people who vote Republican, so some people didn't learn, even over 40 years.

    GH

  10. #1330

    Re: The Run to the WH

    I can understand white, middle age men voting for Tiny.
    Anybody else I can't.
    Face it. It's the apocalypse.

  11. #1331

    Re: The Run to the WH

    Trump threatens to pull GOP convention from Charlotte unless ‘full attendance’ allowed
    BY BRIAN MURPHY, LAUREN LINDSTROM, AND JIM MORRILL
    MAY 25, 2020 08:38 AM ,

    President Donald Trump threatened Monday morning to move August’s Republican National Convention from Charlotte if the state is not able to commit to “full attendance” at the convention.

    Vice President Mike Pence also said Monday morning the convention could be moved due to the pace of the state’s reopening process.

    North Carolina is currently in Phase Two of Gov. Roy Cooper’s coronavirus reopening plan. Indoor gatherings are limited to 10 people. Before the virus, the RNC was expected to bring 50,000 people to Charlotte for events connected to the convention.

    In a series of tweets, Trump demanded an immediate answer from Cooper, a Democr

    In a statement posted to Cooper’s Twitter account at 10:45 a.m., about two and half hours after Trump’s tweets, Cooper’s press secretary, Dory MacMillan, said:

    “State health officials are working with the RNC and will review its plans as they make decisions about how to hold the convention in Charlotte. North Carolina is relying on data and science to protect our state’s public health and safety.”

    The Republican National Convention is scheduled for Aug. 24 to Aug. 27 at the Spectrum Center.

    TRUMP’S TWEETS

    “I love the Great State of North Carolina, so much so that I insisted on having the Republican National Convention in Charlotte at the end of August. Unfortunately, Democrat Governor, @RoyCooperNC is still in Shutdown mood & unable to guarantee that by August we will be allowed full attendance in the Arena,” Trump wrote on Twitter.

    “In other words, we would be spending millions of dollars building the Arena to a very high standard without even knowing if the Democrat Governor would allow the Republican Party to fully occupy the space. Plans are being made by many thousands of enthusiastic Republicans, and others, to head to beautiful North Carolina in August.

    “They must be immediately given an answer by the Governor as to whether or not the space will be allowed to be fully occupied. If not, we will be reluctantly forced to find, with all of the jobs and economic development it brings, another Republican National Convention site. This is not something I want to do. Thank you, and I LOVE the people of North Carolina!”

    The Republican National Convention organizers are scheduled to take over the Spectrum Center in mid-July for an extensive rebuilding of the venue, including raising the floor of the arena.

    Charlotte City Council member Ed Driggs, a Republican, questioned Trump’s authority to pull the convention himself. Charlotte’s contract is with the GOP’s Committee on Arrangements.

    He said he doubted that any other city could put together a convention now given the two-year process Charlotte has undertaken, including arranging a venue, hotel space and related contracts. Driggs noted that the City Council already accepted a $50 million federal security grant for the convention in April.

    “I think this is the kind of thing that happens in politics, where, and particularly the president is known for dramatic gestures,” Driggs said.” I don’t know whether that tweet by him is supported by the Republican Party and all the people with whom we have been in negotiation for a couple of years.”

    Pence, in an appearance on Fox News’ “Fox and Friends,” said Trump was making “just a very reasonable request of the governor of North Carolina.”

    “We all want to be in Charlotte. We love North Carolina. Having a sense now is absolutely essential because of the immense preparations that are involved, and we look forward to working with Gov. Cooper, getting a swift response and if need be moving the national convention to a state that is farther along on reopening and can say with confidence that we can gather there,” Pence said.

    Earlier in the interview, Pence mentioned Texas, Georgia and Florida as three states that have reopened more quickly.

    WHERE WILL CORONAVIRUS SPREAD STAND IN AUGUST?

    Charlotte Mayor Vi Lyles issued a statement Monday that echoed Cooper’s call for data to guide decisions.

    “With the health and safety of our residents and visitors being the top priority, the city of Charlotte will continue to follow guidance from Governor Cooper and public health professionals in determining the best and safest way to host the Republican National Convention,” Lyles said. “While I’ve remained consistent in my statements regarding the RNC being held in Charlotte, the science and data will ultimately determine what we will collectively do for our city.”

    North Carolina has more than 23,200 lab-confirmed cases of coronavirus and more than 740 people have died from the virus, according to the state’s Department of Health and Human Services. But Cooper, along with DHHS Secretary Mandy Cohen, have taken gradual steps in May to reopen some of the state’s economy.

    State Rep. Mark Brody, a member of the Republican National Committee, predicted that by late August the greatest worries about the virus will have subsided.

    “(The convention) is so far out in time that this will more than likely all be over by then. Unless by somebody’s imagination they’re creating new things they’re attributing to the virus. This thing will eventually end and I think it’ll be pretty soon,” said Brody, who is from Union County.

    Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation’s top infectious disease expert, told NPR last week he’s certain coronavirus infections will continue into the fall and winter “because it’s not going to disappear from the planet.”

    “So it isn’t inevitable that we’re going to have a massive rebound,” he said. “What is inevitable is that we will see cases.”

    Researchers’ attempts to predict cases and deaths have fluctuated widely, even among different updates to the same model. But as of last week, the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington estimated the death toll in North Carolina by August would reach about 2,500, more than triple the current number, The News & Observer reported.

    Cooper has said enough progress has been made to gradually ease restrictions, and said if key benchmarks for improvement continue to be met then the state could enter its next phase of reopening in late June. But Republicans have called on him to go faster.

    “Now more than ever, we need the economic boost that this convention brings, especially to a hospitality industry that has been especially hard hit,” Mecklenburg County GOP Vice Chairman Sarah Reidy-Jones said in a statement. “Governor Cooper’s policies have been drastically devastating for North Carolinians, especially the 1 in 7 Charlotte residents that comprise of its hospitality sector. We strongly encourage Governor Cooper to put the good of the state’s economic recovery above any political posturing or personal feelings.”

    Michael Whatley, the chairman of the NC GOP, wrote in a tweet that the state party “is excited to rollout the red carpet and welcome” Trump and the national party to Charlotte. “We can have a safe Convention in NC and nominate President Trump,” he wrote.

    SCALED-DOWN EVENT?

    Fellow council member Malcolm Graham, a Democrat, said the type of certainty that Trump was asking for was nearly impossible to provide at the end of May. Graham called a full-blown convention “insane” and said any event cannot be the same scale as was imagined.

    “If the President believes that he needs some guarantee, then maybe he needs to take the convention to Mar-a-Lago,” said Graham, referencing the president’s club in South Florida where he Trump often vacations.

    “This is not about politics, it’s about the public health,” Graham said. “We have a fiduciary responsibility as a community to ensure that we not only protect the public safety during the RNC, but also protect the public health.”

    Graham said he understands that hotels and restaurant owners are eager to reopen and serve convention guests. But he raised concerns about frontline workers like airport baggage handlers, Uber drivers and hotel housekeepers, who would be in contact with thousands of people during the convention.

    “If you’ve got 50,000 folks coming to Charlotte ‘everything as usual,’ (then) in 14 days when they all leave, all the work we have done in terms of social distancing and following the guidelines of the local health department will have gone in vain,” he said.

    City council member Larken Egleston, a Democrat who was the swing vote on bringing the convention to Charlotte, agreed with Graham about the timing of making a decision. The Charlotte City Council voted 6-5 in July 2018 to support hosting the convention where Trump will be re-nominated.

    “I think reasonable people understand there might not be all the answers yet to what either convention will look like but undoubtedly they’ll look different than normal,” he said. “If Trump is unwilling to consider that changes will have to be made to hold in person events that’s just not realistic.”

    The Democratic National Convention was pushed back from its original July date to Aug. 17 through Aug. 20 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The convention could be scaled back and parts of it handled virtually due to the coronavirus pandemic, Democrats, including presumptive nominee Joe Biden, have said.

    Other events with big crowds in North Carolina have had to adjust, though it is clear that some in the state are not willing to abide by the orders to avoid large gatherings.

    Charlotte Motor Speedway hosted a NASCAR race Sunday evening with no fans in the stands. It was the first major sporting event in the state since the pandemic forced the cancellation of the ACC men’s basketball tournament in March.

    The spectator-less race came one day after more than 4,000 fans packed into an Alamance County speedway to watch races, in defiance of Cooper’s orders.

    KEY STATE FOR 2020

    Cooper is up for re-election in November. Brody said Cooper could face political problems if the convention were moved.

    “It’s a political slap in the face if Cooper tries to play silly games with the convention and dilute the importance and celebration that the Republicans are going to have here. ... If I were to bet I think it will be here in August. And if it isn’t, Cooper will play a real high price at the polls. It’ll anger the base like you’ve never seen it angered before.”

    Trump won North Carolina in his 2016 Electoral College victory. The state is again seen as a key swing state in the presidential election — and even more so in the tight race for control of the Senate.

    “There will be a convention in Charlotte. It’s a matter of what it looks like,” U.S. Sen. Thom Tillis, a North Carolina Republican who is up for re-election in 2020, told the Charlotte Observer late last week.

    “There’s an entire support infrastructure that needs to be available.”

    Many of the state’s businesses were allowed to open for the first time in two months on Friday, May 22. Tillis said the convention’s host committee is working on specifics. He said he spoke with Lyles and felt that she was supportive of moving forward.

    “We need to crystallize in the next two weeks exactly what the plans are,” he said in a phone interview with The Charlotte Observer.

    Cal Cunningham, the Democratic nominee for the Senate seat, said the state should listen to the recommendations of the public health experts.

    “We’re certainly not ready to have large gatherings in North Carolina at this point. We can be hopeful that this virus will burn out and disappear before it’s convention time. But that’s not what the public health experts seem to be suggesting. I strongly urge them to be listening,” he told the Charlotte Observer in a phone interview late last week.

    Read more here: https://www.charlotteobserver.com/ne...#storylink=cpy
    “No matter how cynical I get, I just can't keep up.” – Lily Tomlin.




  12. #1332

    Re: The Run to the WH

    "...unless 'full attendance' allowed" I know it is a hard decision to make for the city and state to suggest that the convention be moved. But if that is the criterion Trump will insist upon to have it there, I would have no qualms at all about saying right this minute that an arena full to the rafters will not be possible in August, and if that's what you want, you'll need to find another place.

    I saw that comment about the contract for the convention not involving Trump directly. But we all know that the Republican National Committee or their "Committee on Arrangements" will never, ever think of going against Trump's wishes. So if he says "move it", it will move.

    GH

  13. #1333

    Re: The Run to the WH

    Quote Originally Posted by GlennHarman View Post
    "...unless 'full attendance' allowed" I know it is a hard decision to make for the city and state to suggest that the convention be moved. But if that is the criterion Trump will insist upon to have it there, I would have no qualms at all about saying right this minute that an arena full to the rafters will not be possible in August, and if that's what you want, you'll need to find another place.

    I saw that comment about the contract for the convention not involving Trump directly. But we all know that the Republican National Committee or their "Committee on Arrangements" will never, ever think of going against Trump's wishes. So if he says "move it", it will move.

    GH
    Gee I wonder where he wants to move it? Wink wink

    “No matter how cynical I get, I just can't keep up.” – Lily Tomlin.




  14. #1334

    Re: The Run to the WH

    Yes, I noticed that you had put "Florida" in bold letters. GH

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