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  1. #661

    Re: The Run to the WH

    They helped Trump win Michigan, then his immigration crackdown split their community
    By Liz Goodwin

    Part 2

    Crystal Kassab Jabiro felt like she hadn’t had a moment to herself all day. The middle school history teacher ferried her two kids to Chaldean Mass, then to her son’s last soccer game of the season, then to a First Communion party, and finally to her daughter’s piano recital. Exhausted, Jabiro logged onto Facebook when she finally made it back to her comfortable home in the western suburbs of Detroit Sunday evening. What she watched there sent a bolt of fear through her.

    “I saw all of these videos with people screaming and crying downtown at the federal building,” she recalled. “Crying after their loved ones.” Another video showed a line of Chaldeans waiting to get on a bus to be taken away to an ICE detention center, including a man with an IV still in his arm.

    “I stared at all these videos in disbelief like, ‘Oh my God, it hit us,’ ” she said. “Everybody thought we were safe and we weren’t.”

    The June 2017 raids largely targeted families who had arrived more recently to the United States, like the Slewos, who live on the east side in Madison Heights — far from the lush country club in West Bloomfield. But some Chaldeans like Jabiro, who are from more affluent families and did not personally know any deportees, nonetheless interpreted the arrests as an attack on the entire community. Carrying them out on a Sunday, Sabbath day for Christians, only deepened the insult.

    Jabiro discovered some Chaldeans were gathering at a local charter school to provide legal assistance to the families affected by the raids and quickly volunteered her help.


    “I left my kids by their grandma and I went down there and I didn’t come back home until like 2 o’clock in the morning,” Jabiro recalled. “I went every single day for like 11 days straight.”

    Two years later, the shock of the initial roundup has worn off. But to Jabiro, a political moderate who voted for Trump in 2016 largely due to his stance on abortion, the way she sees the president has been changed forever.

    “I think they felt like we’re going to be protected and Trump cares about us,” she said of the Chaldean community. “But I think in the end they got played, basically.”

    She added: “I’m definitely not voting for Trump.”

    Chaldeans are not united in that interpretation, however, and it’s unclear to what extent Trump’s support has dissipated in the community. Even members of Jabiro’s own family disagree with her and do not blame Trump for deporting Chaldeans, though they feel bad for their plight.

    “Trump is just doing what the law is,” Jabiro’s father, Amir Kassab, 74, explained. “He can’t create a new law.”

    Kassab said he plans to vote for Trump again if the economy continues to do well.

    Anweya, the activist who attended a Trump rally in 2016, said she’s “very disappointed” in Trump, but still is praying that he changes his response to the Chaldeans before the election.

    Other Chaldeans have brushed off the crackdown entirely because most of the affected people had committed a crime.

    But Jabiro said those crimes don’t justify deportations that could lead to a death sentence.

    “Nobody’s applauding them for their criminal efforts,” she explained. “We know that they were criminals. But we have a system in place where you pay the time for the crime.”


    At the makeshift clearinghouse where Jabiro volunteered, Ashourina Slewo was finally able to find help for her father. A few days after he was picked up by ICE, she sat in her basement making calls to immigration attorneys. One told her that for $12,000, she could guarantee her father wouldn’t be deported. “I don’t even have $12,” she replied, and hung up. A few moments later, Ashourina woke up with her face pressed to the basement floor and realized she had passed out from the stress. In their brief phone calls, her father begged her to stop fighting his deportation, saying he would agree to be sent back to Iraq so that she wouldn’t have to find the money for his defense.

    She told him no. “I would rather die than see my dad get deported,” Ashourina said.

    She found free representation for her father through a nonprofit legal aid group set up by two Chaldean lawyers, Nadine Yousif and Nora Youkhana, and the American Civil Liberties Union won temporary relief for many Iraqis with a class-action suit that included the Slewos. With help from donations and a loan from Michigan’s Chaldean community, Ashourina was able to pay a $15,000 bond to free her father nine months after he was detained. Warda Slewo is home, and awaiting his court date in 2022. And though, as a noncitizen, he can’t vote anyway, he’s lost all his former affection for Trump.

    “You see people with absolutely no skin in the game come out and help us,” Ashourina said. “This group of people have restored my faith in our community.”

    But the reprieve is only temporary. The ACLU’s suit was recently overturned, and immigration judges have begun denying some Iraqi Christians’ appeals, unconvinced by their arguments that they will more likely than not face torture or death if they are deported. Chaldean community leaders, including Martin Manna, the head of the Chaldean Chamber of Commerce, attempted to use their political influence to lobby the Trump administration to ease up on the deportations, but to no avail. Two members of Congress from Michigan — Democratic Representative Andy Levin and Republican Representative John Moolenaar — have introduced legislation that would delay the deportations for two years, but it’s unclear if it will get a vote.

    In August, a video began making its way around the Internet that revived the pain of the initial raids. Jimmy Aldaoud, a 41-year-old Chaldean Catholic who had never set foot in Iraq and spoke no Arabic, pleaded in a grainy cellphone video that he found himself alone and afraid on the streets of Iraq, without the insulin he needed to treat his diabetes, after he was deported by ICE last June.

    “I begged them I said, ‘Please, I’ve never seen that country,’ ” Aldaoud says in the video. “I don’t understand the language. Nobody speaks English.”

    A few days after the video went viral, the news broke among Michigan’s Chaldeans that Aldaoud had died, likely from complications with his diabetes and lack of insulin. Aldaoud had immigrated legally to the United States with his family as a baby, but did not go through the process of attaining citizenship and then committed crimes including theft, which put citizenship beyond reach.


    For Ashourina, Aldaoud’s death was a disturbing presentiment of what could happen to her own father should he lose his court case in 2022.

    “If my dad is deported, I’m going to plan a funeral without a body and that’s our reality,” she said. “That could be the reality of hundreds of others. And no one deserves that.”


    http://apps.bostonglobe.com/nation/p...dison-heights/
    There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life.”

    ― Frank Zappa





  2. #662

    Re: The Run to the WH

    Quote Originally Posted by Ti-Amie View Post
    From Mayor Pete

    Liz Goodwin
    @lizcgoodwin·
    6h
    “My party’s not known for worrying about the deficit or the debt too much but it’s time for us to start getting into that,” Mayor Pete says in NH town hall in response to voter anxious about debt. Says everything his campaign has proposed is paid for.

    Mayor Pete expanded on this in the gaggle: “I believe every Presidency of my lifetime has been an example of deficits growing under Republican government and shrinking under Democratic government, but ... my party’s got to get more comfortable talking about this issue”
    I just caught the end of O'Donnell's show, and I think he's completely off base with his criticism of Buttigieg. It seems that in American politics that Republicans are given credit for things they never do, and don't really believe in, and Democrats never get credit for the things they actually do, but are blamed for every problem in government. I interrupted Buttigieg's remarks as meaning that Democrats should talk more about fiscal responsibility to blunt the false-notion that they are tax & spend with no limits on the size of government.

  3. #663

    Re: The Run to the WH

    Quote Originally Posted by skatingfan View Post
    I just caught the end of O'Donnell's show, and I think he's completely off base with his criticism of Buttigieg. It seems that in American politics that Republicans are given credit for things they never do, and don't really believe in, and Democrats never get credit for the things they actually do, but are blamed for every problem in government. I interrupted Buttigieg's remarks as meaning that Democrats should talk more about fiscal responsibility to blunt the false-notion that they are tax & spend with no limits on the size of government.
    He did clarify that that is exactly what he meant.
    There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life.”

    ― Frank Zappa





  4. #664

    Re: The Run to the WH

    Interesting piece by the NY Times Editorial Board

    Buttigieg’s Untenable Vow of Silence
    He needs to give voters more information about his work for the consulting firm McKinsey.

    By The Editorial Board
    The editorial board is a group of opinion journalists whose views are informed by expertise, research, debate and certain longstanding values. It is separate from the newsroom.

    Dec. 5, 2019

    Pete Buttigieg worked nearly three years for the consulting firm McKinsey & Company, and he has presented that experience as a kind of capitalist credential — distinguishing him from some rivals for the Democratic presidential nomination, and inoculating him against Republican attacks.

    “They’ll try the socialist thing,” Mr. Buttigieg told an Iowa audience in September, referring to a likely line of attack by President Trump and his allies against whichever Democrat emerges as his opponent in next year’s election, “but the thing is, I got started in the private sector.”

    The thing is, Mr. Buttigieg has said precious little about his time at McKinsey. He has not named the clients for whom he worked, nor said much about what he did. He says his lips are sealed by a nondisclosure agreement he signed when he left the firm in 2010 and that he has asked the company to release him from the agreement. It has not yet agreed to do so.

    This is not a tenable situation. Mr. Buttigieg owes voters a more complete account of his time at the company. Voters seeking an alternative to Mr. Trump should demand that candidates not only reject Mr. Trump’s positions, but also his behavior — including his refusal to share information about his health and his business dealings. This standard requires Mr. Buttigieg to talk about his time at McKinsey. It similarly requires Joe Biden and Senator Bernie Sanders to stop dragging their feet and release their health records to the public.

    In Mr. Buttigieg’s case, the most straightforward solution is for McKinsey to release him from his vows of silence — or at least to substitute a significantly more permissive agreement.

    The obligation to provide more information, however, ultimately falls on Mr. Buttigieg. He must find a way to give voters a more complete accounting of his time at the company.

    What he has provided, so far, is a kind of romanticized sketch of the life of a consultant.

    “Back to the U.S. in 2007,” Mr. Buttigieg wrote in his 2019 memoir, Shortest Way Home, “I landed a job in Chicago at McKinsey & Company, and my classroom was everywhere — a conference room, a serene corporate office, the break room of a retail store, a safe house in Iraq, or an airplane seat — any place that could accommodate me and my laptop.”

    In various interviews, he has said working at McKinsey taught him about the power of big data, that it taught him “street smarts,” and that it convinced him to enter public service.

    He has not offered the kind of details necessary to take the measure of that account.

    Instead, in some more recent interviews, Mr. Buttigieg has sought to play down his McKinsey years, telling one reporter, “It’s not something that I think is essential in my story.”

    But that is inconsistent with the manner in which Mr. Buttigieg has chosen to present himself to voters, as a candidate with roots in the private sector. Those three years at McKinsey represent Mr. Buttigieg’s only substantial claim on such experience.

    The McKinsey experience also looms large because Mr. Buttigieg is running on a short résumé. Those three years account for fully 20 percent of his post-college career.

    And working at McKinsey is not quite the résumé booster it used to be.

    The Times reported this week that the consulting firm has advised the Trump administration on the logistics of its cruel crackdown on immigration. McKinsey also has offered its services as a consultant to brutal and corrupt governments and state-owned enterprises in other countries, including China, Russia and Saudi Arabia.

    Mr. Buttigieg has criticized the company, and cast the troubles as largely postdating his tenure. “As somebody who left the firm a decade ago, seeing what certain people in that firm have decided to do is extremely frustrating and extremely disappointing,” he told CNN.

    But that’s an incomplete answer. Mr. Buttigieg needs to explain what he did at McKinsey.


    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/12/05/o...-mckinsey.html
    There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life.”

    ― Frank Zappa





  5. #665

    Re: The Run to the WH

    A response to the above:

    stuart stevens @stuartpstevens

    I mean, guys, we have a POTUS whose campaign manager, deputy campaign manager, National Security advisor. foreign policy advisor, personal lawyer, first Congressional endorsers, are all felons. And we’re really worried about what a Rhodes scholar did at McKinsey?
    @PeteButtigieg
    The Times is right in this case re Buttigieg and has lagged in reporting on the Tiny related crime spree.
    There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life.”

    ― Frank Zappa





  6. #666

    Re: The Run to the WH

    Amy Siskind ��️*��
    @Amy_Siskind

    On House Resolution 546, disapproving of Russia being included in the future Group of Seven summits, the vote was approved 339-71.

    Among the "not voting" was.....you guessed it....Tulsi Gabbard.
    http://clerk.house.gov/evs/2019/roll643.xml
    There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life.”

    ― Frank Zappa





  7. #667

    Re: The Run to the WH

    Devil's advocate. Tiny has not released anything about himself since he announced his presidential bid. Why should ANY democrat provide such data? The precedent has been set.
    You can't keep taking the "higher road". You can't keep saying the dumb "when they go low, we go high". Look where that led you to.
    Missing winter...

  8. #668

    Re: The Run to the WH

    Buttigieg releases ‘summary’ of his work for consulting firm McKinsey

    By Chelsea Janes Dec. 6, 2019

    GRINNELL, Iowa — Pete Buttigieg on Friday released what he called “a summary” of his work during his 2½ years with McKinsey and Co., an attempt to “provide as much clarity as possible” about his record amid increased calls for transparency about his time with the consulting behemoth.

    In a statement issued by his campaign Friday evening, the South Bend, Ind., mayor also reiterated his request to McKinsey and Co. to free him from the confidentiality agreement that prevents him from disclosing further details. His campaign has asked the company to free him from that agreement once before, but the company did not oblige.

    “I was assigned to months-long stints on ‘teams’ of typically three or four people working on a study for a client. The bulk of my work on these teams consisted of doing mathematical analysis, conducting research, and preparing presentations,” Buttigieg wrote. “I never worked on a project inconsistent with my values, and if asked to do so, I would have left the firm rather than participate.”

    While he did not disclose names of private companies, Buttigieg outlined seven projects to which he was assigned during his tenure. He said he analyzed cost-saving options in administration and overhead costs for “a non-profit health insurance provider.” He said he analyzed the effects of price cuts on items for a grocery store chain, and he examined opportunities to sell more energy-efficient products for a “consumer goods retail chain” in another project.

    Buttigieg also said he worked on a project co-sponsored by the Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Energy and others to analyze ways to fight climate change with energy efficiency, and that he also worked separately with an environmental nonprofit to research renewable energy opportunities. Finally, Buttigieg — who served in Afghanistan with the U.S. Naval Reserve — said he worked for a “U.S. Government department in a project focused on increasing employment and entrepreneurship in Iraq and Afghanistan.”

    The disclosure comes as Buttigieg has risen in Iowa polls, leading to increased scrutiny on his record. His association with McKinsey and Co. has drawn criticism from voters and fellow candidates who say his time there signals an affinity for corporate America at a time when the Democratic Party is trying to diminish the role of corporations in politics. McKinsey, one of the nation’s largest and most lucrative consulting firms, has a reputation for secrecy. This week, the New York Times and ProPublica published a report detailing the firm’s consulting work for ICE.


    “I believe transparency is particularly important under the present circumstances in our country, which is one of the reasons why I have released all tax returns from my time in the private sector and since,” Buttigieg wrote. “I am today reiterating my request that McKinsey release me from this agreement, and I again make clear that I authorize them to release the full list of clients I was assigned to serve. This company must recognize the importance of transparency in the exceptional case of a former employee becoming a competitive candidate for the U.S. presidency.”

    Buttigieg’s reference to releasing his tax returns was one of several jabs he has thrown at the transparency of his fellow candidates, particularly Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D.-Mass.). The 37-year-old has suggested Warren needs to release her tax returns from her time practicing law in the private sector. Warren has argued Buttigieg should open his fundraisers to the press — something he said Friday he doesn’t like to do out of respect for the privacy of the hosts of private fundraisers, but that he wouldn’t rule out opening them up in the future.

    “We can keep having that conversation. I’m open to it. I just think it’s interesting when someone suddenly decides it’s important after doing it a different way for a long time,” said Buttigieg, taking a not-so-veiled shot at Warren’s Senate fundraising campaigns, which included big-dollar fundraisers.

    The need for Buttigieg to distance himself from McKinsey’s secretive corporate reputation and address his closed-door fundraisers goes beyond being able to counter attacks from his opponents. In the past few days, voters have been confronting Buttigieg with similar questions about who is funding his campaign and what Buttigieg is telling them, as well as his time in corporate America. Friday morning in New Hampshire, a voter asked him about his time at McKinsey. Friday evening at Grinnell College, Buttigieg addressed demonstrators who carried signs, one of which read “Wall Street Pete.”

    “I remember when they said the same thing about Obama and then he set up the [Consumer Financial Protection Bureau] and put Elizabeth Warren in charge of it and delivered some of the toughest regulations on Wall Street ever since,” Buttigieg said. Warren, who pushed for the creation of the CFPB, was never put in charge of the agency after its creation.


    An hour or so after Buttigieg released the summary, it was clear that some still hoped he would go further. At an event moderated by mayors in Waterloo, Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot pressed Buttigieg to break his nondisclosure agreement, saying that McKinsey likely would not release him from it, so he should take matters into his own hands.

    “You should break the NDA,” Lightfoot told him on a stage in front of a few hundred people.

    “I’m going to give them a chance to do the right thing,” said Buttigieg, who said later he needs to collect “some advice” on what the consequences would be for breaking the agreement. He reiterated the hope that his former employer would not put him in “an untenable situation” by refusing to release him from the agreement and forcing him to choose between going against his word and limiting his ability to be transparent.

    “I am urging my former employer to do the right thing,” Buttigieg said. “And resolve it in the cleanest way it can be.”

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/polit...ff7_story.html
    There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life.”

    ― Frank Zappa





  9. #669

    Re: The Run to the WH

    Quote Originally Posted by Ti-Amie View Post
    Buttigieg releases ‘summary’ of his work for consulting firm McKinsey

    By Chelsea Janes Dec. 6, 2019

    GRINNELL, Iowa — Pete Buttigieg on Friday released what he called “a summary” of his work during his 2½ years with McKinsey and Co., an attempt to “provide as much clarity as possible” about his record amid increased calls for transparency about his time with the consulting behemoth.

    In a statement issued by his campaign Friday evening, the South Bend, Ind., mayor also reiterated his request to McKinsey and Co. to free him from the confidentiality agreement that prevents him from disclosing further details. His campaign has asked the company to free him from that agreement once before, but the company did not oblige.

    “I was assigned to months-long stints on ‘teams’ of typically three or four people working on a study for a client. The bulk of my work on these teams consisted of doing mathematical analysis, conducting research, and preparing presentations,” Buttigieg wrote. “I never worked on a project inconsistent with my values, and if asked to do so, I would have left the firm rather than participate.”

    While he did not disclose names of private companies, Buttigieg outlined seven projects to which he was assigned during his tenure. He said he analyzed cost-saving options in administration and overhead costs for “a non-profit health insurance provider.” He said he analyzed the effects of price cuts on items for a grocery store chain, and he examined opportunities to sell more energy-efficient products for a “consumer goods retail chain” in another project.

    Buttigieg also said he worked on a project co-sponsored by the Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Energy and others to analyze ways to fight climate change with energy efficiency, and that he also worked separately with an environmental nonprofit to research renewable energy opportunities. Finally, Buttigieg — who served in Afghanistan with the U.S. Naval Reserve — said he worked for a “U.S. Government department in a project focused on increasing employment and entrepreneurship in Iraq and Afghanistan.”

    The disclosure comes as Buttigieg has risen in Iowa polls, leading to increased scrutiny on his record. His association with McKinsey and Co. has drawn criticism from voters and fellow candidates who say his time there signals an affinity for corporate America at a time when the Democratic Party is trying to diminish the role of corporations in politics. McKinsey, one of the nation’s largest and most lucrative consulting firms, has a reputation for secrecy. This week, the New York Times and ProPublica published a report detailing the firm’s consulting work for ICE.


    “I believe transparency is particularly important under the present circumstances in our country, which is one of the reasons why I have released all tax returns from my time in the private sector and since,” Buttigieg wrote. “I am today reiterating my request that McKinsey release me from this agreement, and I again make clear that I authorize them to release the full list of clients I was assigned to serve. This company must recognize the importance of transparency in the exceptional case of a former employee becoming a competitive candidate for the U.S. presidency.”

    Buttigieg’s reference to releasing his tax returns was one of several jabs he has thrown at the transparency of his fellow candidates, particularly Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D.-Mass.). The 37-year-old has suggested Warren needs to release her tax returns from her time practicing law in the private sector. Warren has argued Buttigieg should open his fundraisers to the press — something he said Friday he doesn’t like to do out of respect for the privacy of the hosts of private fundraisers, but that he wouldn’t rule out opening them up in the future.

    “We can keep having that conversation. I’m open to it. I just think it’s interesting when someone suddenly decides it’s important after doing it a different way for a long time,” said Buttigieg, taking a not-so-veiled shot at Warren’s Senate fundraising campaigns, which included big-dollar fundraisers.

    The need for Buttigieg to distance himself from McKinsey’s secretive corporate reputation and address his closed-door fundraisers goes beyond being able to counter attacks from his opponents. In the past few days, voters have been confronting Buttigieg with similar questions about who is funding his campaign and what Buttigieg is telling them, as well as his time in corporate America. Friday morning in New Hampshire, a voter asked him about his time at McKinsey. Friday evening at Grinnell College, Buttigieg addressed demonstrators who carried signs, one of which read “Wall Street Pete.”

    “I remember when they said the same thing about Obama and then he set up the [Consumer Financial Protection Bureau] and put Elizabeth Warren in charge of it and delivered some of the toughest regulations on Wall Street ever since,” Buttigieg said. Warren, who pushed for the creation of the CFPB, was never put in charge of the agency after its creation.


    An hour or so after Buttigieg released the summary, it was clear that some still hoped he would go further. At an event moderated by mayors in Waterloo, Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot pressed Buttigieg to break his nondisclosure agreement, saying that McKinsey likely would not release him from it, so he should take matters into his own hands.

    “You should break the NDA,” Lightfoot told him on a stage in front of a few hundred people.

    “I’m going to give them a chance to do the right thing,” said Buttigieg, who said later he needs to collect “some advice” on what the consequences would be for breaking the agreement. He reiterated the hope that his former employer would not put him in “an untenable situation” by refusing to release him from the agreement and forcing him to choose between going against his word and limiting his ability to be transparent.

    “I am urging my former employer to do the right thing,” Buttigieg said. “And resolve it in the cleanest way it can be.”

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/polit...ff7_story.html
    “You should break the NDA,” Lightfoot told him on a stage in front of a few hundred people

    Sorry, I don't think that he should. Either way is a no win situation. If he breaks it, he will be criticized for violating the agreement and then probably have to battle legal issues and more negative publicity brought on by those elements (whether Rep. or Democrat) who oppose his candidacy for whatever reason. If he doesn't, people will keep on harping on this. Either way is a no win, so I say don't break it.

    He hasn't worked there in almost a decade - I am rather tired of people thinking any candidate will have stepped down from heaven and never made a mistake, said something either that was taken out of context, misinterpreted, or that they later changed their opinion on (quite frankly, I would be more than a little skeptical of people who say otherwise or question if I would want to support someone so close-minded that they have never changed their opinion on an issue). The progressive left often seems to be some of the worst at being ready to tear about someone for any transgression, without any consideration of scale or severity - any miscue by someone running for office so often seems to be a call for blanket condemnation that is beyond the reach of redemption or support. The purity tests (and resultant catcalls) need to stop. That isn't to say that people need to give up their right to say something, but just say it and then let it go. This isn't some egregious issue or behavior (Heavens, someone took what was probably a well paying job at a [at least at the time] reasonable respected company - the horrors!). Let's quit eating our own - and maybe then, we might have more people willing to run for office.
    Last edited by Jeff in TX; 12-07-2019 at 04:23 PM.
    "And for my next fearless prediction..."

  10. #670

    Re: The Run to the WH

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff in TX View Post
    “You should break the NDA,” Lightfoot told him on a stage in front of a few hundred people

    Sorry, I don't think that he should. Either way is a no win situation. If he breaks it, he will be criticized for violating the agreement and then probably have to battle legal issues and more negative publicity brought on by those elements (whether Rep. or Democrat) who oppose his candidacy for whatever reason. If he doesn't, people will keep on harping on this. Either way is a no win, so I say don't break it.

    He hasn't worked there in almost a decade - I am rather tired of people thinking any candidate will have stepped down from heaven and never made a mistake, said something either that was taken out of context, misinterpreted, or that they later changed their opinion on (quite frankly, I would be more than a little skeptical of people who say otherwise or question if I would want to support someone so close-minded that they have never changed their opinion on an issue). The progressive left often seems to be some of the worst at being ready to tear about someone for any transgression, without any consideration of scale or severity - any miscue by someone running for office so often seems to be a call for blanket condemnation that is beyond the reach of redemption or support. The purity tests (and resultant catcalls) need to stop. That isn't to say that people need to give up their right to say something, but just say it and then let it go. This isn't some egregious issue or behavior (Heavens, someone took what was probably a well paying job at a [at least at the time] reasonable respected company - the horrors!). Let's quit eating our own - and maybe then, we might have more people willing to run for office.
    One of the reasons we have someone in the WH who gives soliloquies on toilets is because of political "purity tests". It's a trend I see among younger people more than older people. It's a major problem.
    There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life.”

    ― Frank Zappa





  11. #671

    Re: The Run to the WH

    Also. When did McKinsey become a criminal enterprise? When did working for a large multinational become a crime? It is not as if he worked ten years at The Cosa Nostra, or spent ten years working at a tannery specialized in dressing little puppies.
    Missing winter...

  12. #672

    Re: The Run to the WH

    Rachel R. Gonzalez
    @RachelRGonzalez
    Mike Bloomberg is paying FIELD ORGANIZERS $6,000 a month.

    If you don’t think money is impacting the elections, I know plenty of people willing to sacrifice their morals to get paid that much.

    That is absolutely insane.



    There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life.”

    ― Frank Zappa





  13. #673

    Re: The Run to the WH

    $6K for a job where you have to work weekends does not seem exorbitant to me. Plus it is a job with certainly not long term security.
    Missing winter...

  14. #674

    Re: The Run to the WH

    Is that a lot for field organizers? I truly don't know, but I don't think it seems exorbitant by any means for a truly competent one, given the hours and the travel (well, at least in some states) that would probably be required.
    "And for my next fearless prediction..."

  15. #675

    Re: The Run to the WH

    Actually what kind of people they could get for such positions? Money sounds fair to me, but it's very short term and chances of Bloomberg winning very slim. I'd not quit any other decent job for this. Maybe for someone straight after college?
    Roger forever

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