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  1. #1

    Let's Discuss Culture

    We don't seem to have a generic thread on culture/arts, so I started one.

    This was a really interesting interview with Mi'kmaq artist Ursula Johnson. I particularly enjoyed how she described the Mi'kmaq understanding of colour and how it differs from Western colour theory, as well as the descriptions of early art in her culuture, family, and how she started to become an artist. She also discusses the controversy surrounding a sculpture in downtown Halifax of Edward Cornwallis. Cornwallis was the founder of Halifax and at the time he put out a bounty on the Mi'kmaq people because they opposed the founding of a settlement on their land, and I think Johnson has some interesting ideas of how to address concerns around the statue issue.

    Ursula Johnson: A new rock star in the art world
    http://www.cbc.ca/radio/ideas/ursula...orld-1.4500391

  2. #2

    Re: Let's Discuss Culture

    Thanks for starting this thread, skatingfan. Nice article. I think you would enjoy the work of Donna Langhorne, a Plains Ojibway artist from La Ronge Saskatchewan, who recently completed a series of large paintings inspired by the Seven Sacred Teachings.

    Here's a link to an article on the series published on-line by the Saskatchewan Arts Board, which helped to fund the project:

    http://www.saskartsboard.ca/8-featur...ciliation.html
    TIHBS TIHBW

    Avatar --> Politician 1: Philosopher King

  3. #3

    Re: Let's Discuss Culture

    Barack Obama Posts on Facebook: ‘As 2018 Draws to a Close, I’m Continuing a Favorite Tradition of Mine and Sharing My Year-End Lists’

    Solid lists.

    BY ALAN JUDE RYLAND DECEMBER 28, 2018

    As 2018 draws to a close, I’m continuing a favorite tradition of mine and sharing my year-end lists. It gives me a moment to pause and reflect on the year through the books, movies, and music that I found most thought-provoking, inspiring, or just plain loved. It also gives me a chance to highlight talented authors, artists, and storytellers – some who are household names and others who you may not have heard of before. Here’s my best of 2018 list – I hope you enjoy reading, watching, and listening.

    The complete list is below.

    BOOKS

    The books the former president read this year include the critically acclaimed memoir Educated, the classic novels A House for Mr. Biswas and Things Fall Apart, and books on political and socioeconomic theory, including How Democracies Die and The New Geography of Jobs.

    Becoming by Michelle Obama (obviously my favorite!)
    An American Marriage by Tayari Jones
    Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
    The Broken Ladder: How Inequality Affects the Way We Think, Live, and Die by Keith Payne
    Educated by Tara Westover
    Factfulness by Hans Rosling
    Futureface: A Family Mystery, an Epic Quest, and the Secret to Belonging by Alex Wagner
    A Grain of Wheat by Ngugi wa Thiong’o
    A House for Mr Biswas by V.S. Naipaul
    How Democracies Die by Steven Levitsky and Daniel Ziblatt
    In the Shadow of Statues: A White Southerner Confronts History by Mitch Landrieu
    Long Walk to Freedom by Nelson Mandela
    The New Geography of Jobs by Enrico Moretti
    The Return by Hisham Matar
    Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe
    Warlight by Michael Ondaatje
    Why Liberalism Failed by Patrick Deneen
    The World As It Is by Ben Rhodes
    American Prison by Shane Bauer
    Arthur Ashe: A Life by Raymond Arsenault
    Asymmetry by Lisa Halliday
    Feel Free by Zadie Smith
    Florida by Lauren Groff
    Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom by David W. Blight
    Immigrant, Montana by Amitava Kumar
    The Largesse of the Sea Maiden by Denis Johnson
    Life 3.0: Being Human in the Age of Artificial Intelligence by Max Tegmark
    There There by Tommy Orange
    Washington Black by Esi Edugyan

    FILMS

    The films the former president watched this year include Alex Garland’s science fiction thriller Annihilation, Armando Ianucci’s satire The Death of Stalin, Bo Welch’s indie hit Eighth Grade, Barry Jenkins’s adaptation of James Baldwin’s If Beale Street Could Talk, and Debra Granik’s acclaimed Leave No Trace.

    Annihilation
    Black Panther
    BlacKkKlansman
    Blindspotting
    Burning
    The Death of Stalin
    Eighth Grade
    If Beale Street Could Talk
    Leave No Trace
    Minding the Gap
    The Rider
    Roma
    Shoplifters
    Support the Girls
    Won’t You Be My Neighbor

    SONGS

    The songs the former president listened to this year include a mix of different genres and styles, featuring everything from “Bad Bad News” by Leon Bridges to “I Like It” by Cardi B to “Nina Cried Power” by Hozier and “Wait by the River” by Lord Huron.

    “Apes••t” by The Carters
    “Bad Bad News” by Leon Bridges
    “Could’ve Been by H.E.R.” (feat. Bryson Tiller)
    “Disco Yes” by Tom Misch (feat. Poppy Ajudha)
    “Ekombe” by Jupiter & Okwess
    “Every Time I Hear That Song” by Brandi Carlile
    “Girl Goin’ Nowhere” by Ashley McBryde
    “Historia De Un Amor” by Tonina (feat. Javier Limón and Tali Rubinstein)
    “I Like It” by Cardi B (feat. Bad Bunny and J Balvin)
    “Kevin’s Heart” by J. Cole
    “King For A Day” by Anderson East
    “Love Lies” by Khalid & Normani
    “Make Me Feel” by Janelle Monáe
    “Mary Don’t You Weep (Piano & A Microphone 1983 Version)” by Prince
    “My Own Thing” by Chance the Rapper (feat. Joey Purp)
    “Need a Little Time” by Courtney Barnett
    “Nina Cried Power” by Hozier (feat. Mavis Staples)
    “Nterini” by Fatoumata Diawara
    “One Trick Ponies” by Kurt Vile
    “Turnin’ Me Up” by BJ the Chicago Kid
    “Wait by the River” by Lord Huron
    “Wow Freestyle” by Jay Rock (feat. Kendrick Lamar)
    And in honor of one of the great jazz singers of all time, who died this year, a classic album: The Great American Songbook by Nancy Wilson

    Obama’s post prompted an outpouring of support from Americans who appreciated the time he spent crafting the list.

    https://secondnexus.com/news/obama-f...33ab68d22425b2
    "Even if you dance for your enemy on the rock, he will accuse you of splashing water on him." ~ African Proverb




  4. #4

    Re: Let's Discuss Culture

    These are some of Tiny's Books and Movies. He does not listen to music.

    Coming by Stormy Daniels (obviously my favorite!)
    An American Marriage, and divorce, and another marriage and another divorce and buy a bride by Tayari Jones
    Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (She spells it like I DO! WIN!)
    The Broken Ladder that will not climb my beautiful wall: How Inequality Affects the Way We Think, Live, and Die by Keith Payne
    Educated by Tara Westover
    Fartfulness by Hans Rosling
    Future Sourpussface: A Family Mystery (who is Tiffany?), an Eric Quest, and the Secret to Belonging by Alex Wagner
    A Ton of Wheat, and Beef and Ketchup, where is my cheeseburger by Ngugi wa Thiong’o
    A Slum for Mr Biswas by V.S. Naipaul
    How Democracies Die by Steven Levitsky and Daniel Ziblatt (Hey, I WROTE THAT! CHEATERS!)
    In the Shadow of Statues: A Nazi Yankee Confronts History by Mitch Landrieu
    Long Walk to the golf course by Nelson Mandela
    Things Fall Apart at my properties by Chinua Achebe
    American Prison by Shane Bauer (just so I could get a preview)
    Arthur Ashe: A Life by Raymond Arsenault (I thought it was about the coal industry. SAD!)
    Asymmetry by Lisa Halliday (It's spelled ASSYMETRI, beeotch!. DUMB!!!)
    Feel Free by Zadie Smith (Sure, as soon as I pay my loans to Vlad...)
    Mar-A-Lago by Lauren Groff
    Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom by David W. Blight (I thought it was an e-mail from Fred, he is doing great things! BLACK!)
    Immigrant, Montana by Amitava Kumar (I thought it was a list so I could... never mind)
    The Largesse of the Sea Maiden's rack by Denis Johnson
    Life 3.0: Being Human in the Age of Artificial Intelligence by Max Tegmark (I thought you could buy some. BORING!)
    There There by Tommy Orange (Where? Where? DIDN'T GET IT. CONFUSED!)
    Washington Black by Esi Edugyan (No he wasn't. And what is this thing that he did not tell lies? Everybody tells lies, not as big as mine, but yes they do. LIARS!!!)

    Movies:
    Debbie does Dallas
    The Devil and Mrs Jones
    The Opening of Misty Beethoven
    Debbie Does Dallas (Again! GREAT!)
    Boogie Nights (No boobs. BORING!)
    Deep Throat
    Story of O (French porn SUCKS! LAME!)
    Debbie does Dallas (GREAT FILM. GREAT!)
    The Calm before the Stormy Daniels

    And then the VHS broke. CHEAP!!!
    Missing winter...

  5. #5

    Re: Let's Discuss Culture



    Are most of those picture books though? He doesn't do well with words and stuf...
    "Even if you dance for your enemy on the rock, he will accuse you of splashing water on him." ~ African Proverb




  6. #6

    Re: Let's Discuss Culture

    I felt pretty confident, when I read Obama's list of his favorite books of 2018, that that was a larger number of books than Tiny has read cover-to-cover in his entire life. I'd even bet on that, and feel sure to win.

    GH

  7. #7

    Re: Let's Discuss Culture

    A Leonardo Made a $450 Million Splash. Now There’s No Sign of It.

    A scheduled unveiling of the painting last September was canceled without explanation. The Abu Dhabi culture department is refusing to answer questions.CreditCreditKirsty Wigglesworth/Associated Press

    By David D. Kirkpatrick
    March 30, 2019

    ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates — The Louvre Abu Dhabi might seem to have all you could ask for in a world-class museum. Its acclaimed design shades its galleries under a vast dome that appears to hover over the waters of the Persian Gulf. Inside are works by Rembrandt and Vermeer, Monet and van Gogh, Mondrian and Basquiat.

    Yet the work that the Louvre Abu Dhabi once promised would anchor its collection is conspicuously absent: “Salvator Mundi,” a painting of Jesus Christ attributed to Leonardo da Vinci.

    Few works have evoked as much intrigue, either in the world of art or among the courts of Persian Gulf royals. First, its authenticity as the product of Leonardo’s own hand was the subject of intense debate. Then, in November 2017, it became the most expensive work ever sold at auction, fetching $450.3 million from an anonymous bidder who turned out to be a close ally and possible stand-in for the ruler of Saudi Arabia, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman.

    Now, the painting is shrouded in a new mystery: Where in the world is “Salvator Mundi”?

    Although the Abu Dhabi culture department announced about a month after the auction that it had somehow acquired “Salvator Mundi” for display in the local Louvre, a scheduled unveiling of the painting last September was canceled without explanation. The culture department is refusing to answer questions. Staff of the Louvre Abu Dhabi say privately that they have no knowledge of the painting’s whereabouts.

    The Louvre in Paris, which licenses its name to the Abu Dhabi museum, has not been able to locate “Salvator Mundi,” either, according to an official familiar with the museum’s discussions with Abu Dhabi, who declined to be named because of the confidentiality of the talks.

    The announcement that “Salvator Mundi” would go on display at the Louvre Abu Dhabi was a coup for the new museum. But the plan was canceled last September without explanation.


    Officials in the French government, which owns the Louvre in Paris, are eager to include “Salvator Mundi” in a landmark exhibition this fall to mark the 500th anniversary of Leonardo’s death and say they are still holding out hope that the painting might resurface in time. (A representative of the Louvre declined to comment.)

    But some Leonardo experts say they are alarmed by the uncertainty about the painting’s whereabouts and future, especially after the announcement from Abu Dhabi that the painting would go on display to the public.

    “It is tragic,” said Dianne Modestini, a professor at New York University’s Institute of Fine Arts and a conservator who has worked on “Salvator Mundi.” “To deprive the art lovers and many others who were moved by this picture — a masterpiece of such rarity — is deeply unfair.”

    Martin Kemp, an Oxford art historian who has studied the painting, described it as “a kind of religious version of the ‘Mona Lisa’” and Leonardo’s “strongest statement of the elusiveness of the divine.”

    “I don’t know where it is, either,” he added.

    Noting that it was never clear how Abu Dhabi might have acquired the painting from the Saudis in the first place — whether by a gift, loan or private sale — some have speculated that Crown Prince Mohammed might simply have decided to keep it. The Saudi embassy in Washington declined to comment.

    The 33-year-old crown prince may not be the painting’s first royal owner. Believed to have been painted around 1500, “Salvator Mundi” was one of two similar works listed in an inventory of the collection of King Charles I of England after his execution in 1649, Professor Kemp said. But the painting disappeared from the historical record in the late 18th century.

    The painting sold at the record auction later turned up in the collection of a 19th-century British industrialist. It had been so heavily painted over that “it looked like a drug-crazed hippie,” Professor Kemp said, and it was attributed at the time to one of Leonardo’s followers. In 1958, it was sold out of that collection for the equivalent of $1,350 in today’s dollars.

    The claim that the painting was the work of Leonardo himself originated after a pair of dealers spotted it at an auction in New Orleans in 2005 and brought it to Professor Modestini of N.Y.U.

    She stripped away overpainting, repaired damage made by a split in the wood panel, and restored details. Among other things, one of Jesus’s hands appeared to have two thumbs, possibly because the artist changed his mind about where the thumb should be and painted over the original thumb. It had been exposed by scraping later on, and Professor Modestini covered the thumb she believed Leonardo did not want.

    Its new attribution to Leonardo won the painting a spot in a retrospective of his work at the National Gallery in London in 2011. Two years later, a Russian billionaire, Dmitry E. Rybolovlev, bought it for $127.5 million — less than a third of what he sold it for in 2017, when it was auctioned in New York by Christie’s.

    Now the Louvre Abu Dhabi’s failure to exhibit “Salvator Mundi” as promised has revived doubts about whether it is Leonardo’s at all, with skeptics speculating that the new owner may fear public scrutiny.

    An expert on Leonardo’s paintings, Jacques Franck, sent letters to the office of the French president, Emmanuel Macron, raising doubts about the attribution. Mr. Macron’s chief of staff, François-Xavier Lauch, wrote back that the president “was very attentive to the preoccupations.”

    Others have argued that the painting was so extensively restored by Professor Modestini that it is as much her work as Leonardo’s.

    “Nonsense,” she said in an interview, calling these “ridiculous claims.”

    Auction house contracts typically include a five-year authenticity warranty. But the extensive public documentation and debate before the 2017 sale would make it difficult for the buyer to recover the payment by challenging the attribution to Leonardo.

    The anonymous buyer at the auction in New York, Prince Bader bin Abdullah bin Mohammed bin Farhan al-Saud, was a little known member of a distant branch of the Saudi royal family with no publicly known source of great wealth or history as a major art collector. But he was a close friend and confidant of Crown Prince Mohammed. A few months after the auction, the royal court named Prince Bader as the kingdom’s first-ever minister of culture.

    Christie’s initially sought to guard Prince Bader’s identity so closely during the bidding that it created a special account number for him that was known only to a handful of the house’s executives. But contracts and correspondence obtained by The New York Times showed Prince Bader to be the anonymous buyer.

    American officials familiar with the arrangement later said that Prince Bader was in fact acting as a surrogate for Crown Prince Mohammed himself, the true purchaser of “Salvator Mundi.”

    Prince Mohammed’s aggression and impulsiveness have recently come under new scrutiny in the West after American intelligence agencies concluded that he ordered the killing last fall of the dissident Jamal Khashoggi, a Washington Post columnist who was ambushed and dismembered by Saudi agents in a consulate in Istanbul. But by the time of auction, the prince had already shown a taste for pricey trophies, paying $500 million for a yacht and $300 million for a chateau in France.

    As a Times article about Prince Bader’s role in the auction was about to be published in December 2017, the Louvre Abu Dhabi, possibly to deflect attention from the Saudis’ extravagant spending, tweeted that “Salvator Mundi” would be coming to its collection.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/30/a...s&ref=headline


    "Even if you dance for your enemy on the rock, he will accuse you of splashing water on him." ~ African Proverb




  8. #8

    Re: Let's Discuss Culture

    He was completely at ease in having a journalist dismembered at an embassy in a foreign country. Why would he even blink at stealing a painting?
    Missing winter...

  9. #9

    Re: Let's Discuss Culture

    Did he steal it? From the article I understood he might have bought it in the first place.
    Roger forever

  10. #10

    Re: Let's Discuss Culture

    Yes, you are right. I was only joking about MBS. He is really setting a new standard for lowlifes.
    (And no, I am not being completely serious. It is just a painting they are talking about).
    Missing winter...

  11. #11

    Re: Let's Discuss Culture

    Looks like money laundering to me but what do I know?
    "Even if you dance for your enemy on the rock, he will accuse you of splashing water on him." ~ African Proverb




  12. #12
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    Re: Let's Discuss Culture

    Quote Originally Posted by ponchi101 View Post
    Yes, you are right. I was only joking about MBS. He is really setting a new standard for lowlifes.
    (And no, I am not being completely serious. It is just a painting they are talking about).
    Totally misread this and spent 5 minutes trying to figure out what Bethanie Mattek-Sands has to do with this...

  13. #13

    Re: Let's Discuss Culture

    Quote Originally Posted by Ti-Amie View Post
    Looks like money laundering to me but what do I know?
    Who needs to launder money if you own a country and your word is a law?
    Roger forever

  14. #14

    Re: Let's Discuss Culture

    Quote Originally Posted by suliso View Post
    Who needs to launder money if you own a country and your word is a law?
    So, while I'm not sure why you need to launder money if you own a country where your word is law, possibly to hoard money away from the central family and create a nest egg there's ever a coup on your power. I'm not sure, but I know that they do. The Saudi King was implicated in the Panama Papers, so whether it makes sense or not, clearly it happens. And MBS appears to be up to way worse than his dad, so hard to think this is on the up and up.

  15. #15

    Re: Let's Discuss Culture

    He may be laundering for somebody else.
    C'mon, Suliso, think evil. Pure, unadulterated, pristine, fresh from hell evil. Because if you are going that way:
    Why would Vladimir Putin have two people killed in the UK if he is the owner of a country where his word is the law?

    Because these people are bad. To the bone.
    Missing winter...

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