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  1. #3766

    Re: Tennis Random, Random 2.0

    A record that may never be equaled. Even if indeed the new decade begins in 2021, not next week.
    Missing winter...

  2. #3767
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    Re: Tennis Random, Random 2.0

    X0 is the start of a decade, I would think. It's a little wierd to say the tens digit rollover belongs with the prior set.
    I disapprove of this message

  3. #3768

    Re: Tennis Random, Random 2.0

    Quote Originally Posted by James7 View Post
    X0 is the start of a decade, I would think. It's a little wierd to say the tens digit rollover belongs with the prior set.
    There's no year zero, so it starts with 1 so 10 years later is year 11.

  4. #3769

    Re: Tennis Random, Random 2.0

    Quote Originally Posted by James7 View Post
    X0 is the start of a decade, I would think. It's a little wierd to say the tens digit rollover belongs with the prior set.
    That seems obvious but consider that the current century is commonly referred to as the 21st century despite this year being 2019.
    Last edited by 3mlm; 12-30-2019 at 05:19 AM.
    "The official and decisive text to the Rules of Tennis shall be for ever in the English
    language...." ITF Rules of Tennis 2019

  5. #3770

    Re: Tennis Random, Random 2.0

    Quote Originally Posted by 3mlm View Post
    That seems obvious but consider that the current century is commonly referred to as the 21st century despite this year being 2019.
    Century and decade are different. However, if the 21st century started in 2000, then I agree, there's your year 0. The first century had 99 years and ever year thereafter had 100, per common understanding.
    Sometimes you're the windshield, sometimes you're the bug.

  6. #3771

    Re: Tennis Random, Random 2.0

    Juan José Vallejo @jjvallejoa

    On 1/1/2010, the ATP Holy Triad didn't even exist:

    RF: 15 GS, 16 M1K, 5 YE #1
    Nadal: 6 GS, 15 M1K, 1 YE #1
    Djokovic: 1 GS, 5 M1K, 0 YE #1

    On 1/1/2020:

    RF: 20 GS, 28 M1K, 5 YE #1
    Nadal: 19 GS, 35 M1K, 5 YE #1
    Djokovic: 16 GS, 34 M1K, 5 YE #1

    Farewell, Holy Triad decade.
    There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life.”

    ― Frank Zappa





  7. #3772

    Re: Tennis Random, Random 2.0

    Disagree. On 2010 it was clear that the third best player was either Novak or Murray. They both delivered (Murray's 3 slams are augmented with his multiple M1K's).
    But still a good point. This last 20 years have been awesome (except for 2001, which was kind of crappy)
    Missing winter...

  8. #3773

    Re: Tennis Random, Random 2.0

    Kyrgios, de Minaur, and Millman will all donate $100-$250 per ace through the Australian summer season to wildfire victims. Kyrgios announced it first, then the other two followed suit. Waiting for Barty to chime in. Last year, she averaged 6 aces per match. Kyrgios hit almost 16 per match last year. De Minaur served 3.5 on average (maybe that's why he's kicking in more per serve) and Millman hit 4.3.

    https://www.yahoo.com/sports/kyrgios...132814697.html
    Sometimes you're the windshield, sometimes you're the bug.

  9. #3774

    Re: Tennis Random, Random 2.0

    I said in the 2020 Racket Smash thread that I'd tell the story of the Menendez brothers, Michael Joyce, and the 1989 US Open. Michael Joyce tells it best - it's in his episode of the Under Review tennis podcast. He did a two-part interview, and it's at the beginning of the second one. (Both interviews are terrific, though. https://underreviewtennis.com/podcast/)

    Joyce knew the Mendendez brothers through junior tennis in Southern California - they were all top players. He went to the US Open that year with his dad and friends. He and Vince Spadea were watching on a different court than his dad when someone they knew from California came up to them and said both brothers had been killed in their house. They found Joyce's dad and told him. Decided they'd leave in a few hours and call someone when they got back to the city. Then they parted ways again. Shortly after, Joyce's dad feels a tap on his shoulder, and it's Eric Menendez. He invited the Joyces to his box seats. Papa Joyce found his son, gave him hell for saying Eric was dead, and they all sat and watched tennis together.

    The brothers trip to the US Open ended up playing into the trial. Their parents' funeral was in New Jersey the week before the tournament, and afterward, the brothers bought box seats to the tournament, which prosecutors used to illustrate their spending spree after the deaths. (Lyle also skipped playing for UCLA to hire a tennis coach and try to go pro.) Joyce and his dad were considered as witnesses but didn't end up testifying.
    Sometimes you're the windshield, sometimes you're the bug.

  10. #3775

    Re: Tennis Random, Random 2.0

    Sentence increased to 11 years for man who stabbed Petra Kvitova


    PRAGUE -- An appeals court in the Czech Republic on Wednesday upheld a lower court conviction of a man for knifing two-time Wimbledon champion Petra Kvitova in her home and increased his sentence from eight to 11 years in prison.

    The regional court in the city of Brno ruled last March that Radim Zondra caused Kvitova serious bodily harm in December 2016 when he attacked her in her apartment in Prostejov.

    The state prosecutor requested 12 years in prison for Zondra, who pleaded not guilty and appealed.

    The prosecution also appealed, and the High Court in the city of Olomouc handed Zondra an 11-year prison term on Wednesday.

    The verdict is final.

    Kvitova, who is left-handed, had surgery for injuries to her left hand. It took the tennis star more than five months to recover.

    Kvitova is at the Brisbane International this week, warming up for the Australian Open, where she reached the final last year.


    https://www.espn.com/tennis/story/_/...-petra-kvitova

  11. #3776

    Re: Tennis Random, Random 2.0

    Mike Stephens

    #MyBTR- “I had it made. Retired after 22 years of military service and working as an Engineer in the commercial nuclear industry…and yet, something was missing. Many years of my life were spent as the nuclear weapons officer on a trident submarine. I would switch between spending three months underwater, then above, then back under. I wasn’t truly happy with my career. I remember the day my life changed forever. It was August of 2017 and I was on the bus heading from Manhattan to the Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in Flushing Meadows. Eight and a half years into my 10 year career as a nuclear engineer I learned that a childhood friend had days to live; cancer was winning. His plan was to work until 60 and then raise horses, a lifetime dream. One of his last messages was to pursue my dreams in life and not wait until I thought it was financially feasible. My passion was stringing tennis racquets. Beginning with a way to help my daughter as a middle school player, who would constantly shank balls and break strings, I found this love in stringing. The problem was that stringing tennis racquets is a tough way to make a living. It is a grind! There are no retirement plans or 401Ks. It is just a daily grind, but I loved it. Was I crazy? Two months after the 2017 US Open, I decided to leave the commercial nuclear industry and be a full time stringer. I was going to take the leap. The first several months of 2018 were challenging. No more paychecks magically appearing in the checking account. To say it was a struggle would be an understatement. I was only three months into my newfound profession when I began to lose feeling in both my hands. There would be times where items would randomly slip through my fingers. After some time I realized it was severe carpal tunnel, which needed a double surgery to repair. The same day after getting my stitches removed, I had the opportunity to string for the NCAA tournament at Wake Forest. Despite immense pain during these 12 hour days it was an event I always wanted to be a part of. I am now in my second year as a full time stringer. I am fortunate to string for players at all levels of the game from 10U to the ATP and WTA. I work long days but each day I wake up and know that I am doing what I love.” Mike Stephens (stringsensation)

    https://www.behindtheracquet.com/#/mike-stephens/
    There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life.”

    ― Frank Zappa





  12. #3777

    Re: Tennis Random, Random 2.0

    Janko Tipsarevic

    “I retired at the end of last year. I have recently been expanding my academy to four new cities around the world, while coaching part time on the side. After my many years on tour the number one thing I would teach others is persistence. Persistence helped me push through the tremendous amount of mixed emotions that came during my injuries. I am pretty unfortunate dealing with seven surgeries in the last five years. It is a psychological rollercoaster. Though difficult while going through them, it has allowed me to be a better father, husband, business owner, friend and son. I have learned that in order to grow as a person you need to learn how to deal with adversity while also being humble in times of hope. During my injuries there were definitely some serious mental problems I was dealing with, you can even use the term depression to describe how I felt. Dealing with all the ups and downs, doctors and opinions, you just become f**king insane from not knowing what to do. In the end I do not think the general advice of ‘stay positive’ is helpful. There were many times where I fought my way back from injury, played challengers, grinded back, to only get hurt again and start over. I am generally not an optimistic person, or am a fan of optimistic people. I don’t believe that optimists can truly evaluate the situation at hand, while always trying to look on the bright side. I prefer to look at myself as a realist. To see your current situation and understand it to be s**t, while knowing that you are strong, wise and brave enough to face it because there is no other choice, is the only way to live in my opinion. Before I reached my potential I can honestly say that I was a coward and didn’t fully accept who I was. It took some time to realize, out of juniors, that I wasn’t playing against boys anymore and the days of trying to be cool and not giving 110% had to be over. I remember watching Nadal play this up and coming star, Tsonga, at the Australian Open. Nadal was getting blown off the court and was down about two sets to love and 4-1 in the third. On an insignificant point Nadal hits a forehand winner and screams ‘Vamos’ as hard as he can. You could see he truly believed he could win. He ended up losing that set, and the match, 6-1. That’s when I truly realized how big of a coward I was. Here I am acting cool when Rafael Nadal is not embarrassed to show, not only the 15,000 people in Rod Laver Arena, but the whole world, that he is giving maximum effort and still getting killed. It showed me that he isn’t afraid of failure. Working on autopilot of doing the bare minimum of everything you need to do won’t help you live out your dreams. Looking back if I didn’t reach top 10, or the other career accomplishments I had, I don’t think I would’ve been happy because I would have known that I left some on the table. If I realized all this earlier I am sure that I would have been in the top 10 longer. I am in a really good place now, probably working more hours than ever before and not listening to my friends who are saying, ’Now that you are retired you can enjoy life and relax’. I am very excited for the next chapter in my life and becoming a father to a second child.” Janko Tipsarevic (tipsarevicjanko)

    https://www.behindtheracquet.com/#/janko-tipsarevic/
    There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life.”

    ― Frank Zappa





  13. #3778
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    Re: Tennis Random, Random 2.0

    Quote Originally Posted by MeganFernandez View Post
    I said in the 2020 Racket Smash thread that I'd tell the story of the Menendez brothers, Michael Joyce, and the 1989 US Open. Michael Joyce tells it best - it's in his episode of the Under Review tennis podcast. He did a two-part interview, and it's at the beginning of the second one. (Both interviews are terrific, though. https://underreviewtennis.com/podcast/)

    Joyce knew the Mendendez brothers through junior tennis in Southern California - they were all top players. He went to the US Open that year with his dad and friends. He and Vince Spadea were watching on a different court than his dad when someone they knew from California came up to them and said both brothers had been killed in their house. They found Joyce's dad and told him. Decided they'd leave in a few hours and call someone when they got back to the city. Then they parted ways again. Shortly after, Joyce's dad feels a tap on his shoulder, and it's Eric Menendez. He invited the Joyces to his box seats. Papa Joyce found his son, gave him hell for saying Eric was dead, and they all sat and watched tennis together.

    The brothers trip to the US Open ended up playing into the trial. Their parents' funeral was in New Jersey the week before the tournament, and afterward, the brothers bought box seats to the tournament, which prosecutors used to illustrate their spending spree after the deaths. (Lyle also skipped playing for UCLA to hire a tennis coach and try to go pro.) Joyce and his dad were considered as witnesses but didn't end up testifying.
    Near-brush with infamy: I was told later in the school year (when the name was recognizable to me) that Lyle would have been one of my residents when I was an RA at a UCLA dorm.

  14. #3779

    Re: Tennis Random, Random 2.0

    Quote Originally Posted by Scotty View Post
    Near-brush with infamy: I was told later in the school year (when the name was recognizable to me) that Lyle would have been one of my residents when I was an RA at a UCLA dorm.
    And if you liked tennis then, maybe you would have been friends!

    I was an RA. One of the worst years of my life.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Sometimes you're the windshield, sometimes you're the bug.

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