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  1. #5026

    Re: A Chronicle of our Descent to Hades

    No. ETA is Nov 4th, when he refuses to concede his defeat.
    And then, Satan himself will point to another door and say "Oh, you didn't know we have a cellar? Please, come with me".

    As in Venezuela and Argentina. It will take you so long to undo all this damage. You will need at least three administrations, which will not happen as all the judges Mitch is confirming will sabotage any possible progressive move the Dems will attempt.
    Face it. It's the apocalypse.

  2. #5027

    Re: A Chronicle of our Descent to Hades

    Quote Originally Posted by GlennHarman View Post
    "A Chronicle of our Descent to Hades":

    Mama Ti, Are we there yet??

    I know I've asked this question before. But after the Friday we just had (7/10), I wonder if maybe we have arrived:

    Roger Stone's sentence commuted.
    Trump's henchmen manage to fire another district attorney, this time of the Eastern District of New York, someone who was closing in on more of Turmp's felonies.
    The number of COVID-19 cases was the highest by a huge margin that the country has seen in a single day yet.
    Our great leader continues to only view the pandemic as a problem if it is interfering with his re-election chances.

    I think we're there. Let me know. GH


    Drop started this thread and sadly I think there's more to come especially with the EDNY massacre.

    If people don't vote as if their lives and the fate of their country depend on it I think the US is done as a Democracy. I haven't been this pessimistic in a very long time. I thought I was immune to his shenanigans but apparently I'm not.

    Interesting that Barr is now trying to say he had nothing to do with commuting Stone's sentence if that's the right word.

    People are also busy posting the weather in Portsmouth, NH by the way. Sunny day there. We'll see.
    “No matter how cynical I get, I just can't keep up.” – Lily Tomlin.




  3. #5028

    Re: A Chronicle of our Descent to Hades

    Quote Originally Posted by ponchi101 View Post
    No. ETA is Nov 4th, when he refuses to concede his defeat.
    And then, Satan himself will point to another door and say "Oh, you didn't know we have a cellar? Please, come with me".

    As in Venezuela and Argentina. It will take you so long to undo all this damage. You will need at least three administrations, which will not happen as all the judges Mitch is confirming will sabotage any possible progressive move the Dems will attempt.
    The Dems would have to stay in power for at least 16 years and even then things would be shaky. Me, I'd give every new cabinet official a broom and anyone, anyone from head of housekeeping to cabinet secretary who had been appointed by this guy would be out the door.
    “No matter how cynical I get, I just can't keep up.” – Lily Tomlin.




  4. #5029

    Re: A Chronicle of our Descent to Hades

    What exactly is it that one administration in control of both Senate and Congress could not reverse?
    Roger forever

  5. #5030

    Re: A Chronicle of our Descent to Hades

    Quote Originally Posted by suliso View Post
    What exactly is it that one administration in control of both Senate and Congress could not reverse?
    The judges Moscow Mitch has had confirmed, many rated Unqualified by their Barr Associations, will be difficult to remove.

    There is a phenomenon called "burrowing" where people simply hide in place and are difficult to root out.

    It'll be interesting to see how quickly a new Administration acts especially since most of what Tiny has done is via Executive Order and no real laws have been passed.

    I wish there was a way they could just throw everyone appointed by him out. I don't think that's ever had to be done before.
    “No matter how cynical I get, I just can't keep up.” – Lily Tomlin.




  6. #5031

    Re: A Chronicle of our Descent to Hades

    Shannon Watts
    @shannonrwatts
    The U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement is launching a class for private citizens on how to arrest undocumented immigrants. The course will train *non-agents in firearms* and how to make “targeted arrests.”



    ICE is offering a six-week course on how to arrest immigrants - including 'firearms and defensive training' - as critics warns they are using private citizens as their eyes and ears

    ICE introduced a six-week course for private citizens, starting September 15

    Participants will received 'scenario-based training' and learn about 'defensive tactics, firearms familiarization, and targeted arrests'

    The St. Louis Inter-Faith Committee for Latin America told DailyMail.com that the program will drive white citizens to incite violence against immigrants

    Chicago Congressman Jesús 'Chuy' García wonders if the course is part of ICE's plan to have neighbors spy on neighbors to see if they're undocumented

    By ADRY TORRES FOR DAILYMAIL.COM
    PUBLISHED: 15:41 EDT, 8 July 2020 | UPDATED: 20:28 EDT, 8 July 2020

    U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement is launching a class for private citizens in Chicago on how to arrest undocumented immigrants.

    The course, which begins on September 15 and will run one class a week for six weeks, will train non-agents in firearms, defensive training and how to make 'targeted arrests.' ICE plan to roll out the program to cities across the country.

    ICE say they are launching the course to 'bring awareness' to the issues their officers face. But critics say it's an insidious attempt to expand the agency's reach and power.

    Chicago Rep Jesús 'Chuy' García [D-IL] believes ICE wants to use private citizens as their eyes and ears, to spy on their neighbors.

    'Is this a recruitment tool to surveil and have people, neighbors surveil their neighbors to see who might be undocumented in their neighborhood, their community?' García asked in a phone interview with DailyMail.com on Wednesday.

    'Is this an effort to expand the reach of ICE? Does this advance the thrust of criminalizing immigrants and is it going to appeal to conservative types or right-wing types to connect with a police enforcement agency here to target immigrants?' asked the Congressman, who is working with the immigrant community and other advocacy groups to address the course.

    DailyMail.com obtained a copy of an email which was sent by an ICE community relations official from the Chicago field office during the July 4 weekend that introduced the inaugural Enforcement and Removal Operations [ERO] Chicago Citizens Academy.

    'During the ECA [ERO Citizens Academy], participants will gain insight into the many facets and responsibilities of ICE/ERO operations, and hopefully an awareness and appreciation of the issues our officers face every day in the performance of their duties,' wrote Robert Guadian, director of the ICE Chicago field office.

    Participants will learn about Chicago's Enforcement and Removal Operations unit, how to draw up a subject's background and acquire knowledge about the Office of Principal Legal Advisor, a team of more than 1,000 attorneys that provides legal counsel to ICE.

    'Attendees will participate in scenario-based training and exercises conducted in a safe and positive environment, including, but not limited to defensive tactics, firearms familiarization, and targeted arrests,' Guadian wrote.

    'After completion of the ECA, a graduation ceremony will be held on Friday, October 23, 2020; graduates will be awarded a certificate and a commemorative coin. Continuing Education Credits [CEUs] may be available upon request.'

    The federal immigration agency plans to extend the pilot program to other cities across the nation.

    'The intent of the Academy is to foster positive relationships in the communities ICE serves and to build a better understanding of the agency. ICE encourages all, including Rep. Garcia, to apply,' ICE spokeswoman Nicole Alberico wrote in an email to DailyMail.com.

    Sara John, the executive director St. Louis Inter-Faith Committee for Latin America, slammed ICE's program and said its intention is to drive white citizens to incite violence against immigrants, during a phone interview with DailyMail.com on Wednesday.

    'I think what is most alarming is that we continue to see - and perhaps with the murder of George Floyd - have seen more extensively coverage about what happens when white citizens are emboldened and empowered and permitted let alone encouraged to commit acts of violence against people of color,' John said.

    'We know that even though this program is not giving some sort of authorization to individuals outside of the agency to conduct enforcement activity, it is certainly begging and encouraging citizens to carry that idea of taking matters into their own hands and to sort of paint it in this obscure patriotic light of 'this is what good Americans do,' is to target people of color or target people who quote look like an immigrant.'

    John was not not taken aback by the Chicago field office's project to kick off the pilot program because it heads the operations in Missouri, Indiana and Wisconsin where President Donald Trump's anti-immigrant sentiment is shared.

    John believes that the introduction of ICE's Chicago Citizens Academy comes on the heels of President Donald Trump's administration being dealt a defeat in June when the Supreme Court blocked the White House's attempt to end protections for Dreamer immigrants who unlawfully came to the United States with their undocumented parents.

    The 5-4 ruling upheld lower court decisions that found that Trump's 2017 move to rescind the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals [DACA] program was unlawful. The Supreme Court's decision also protected more than 649,000 immigrants from being deported.


    In an earlier statement, the St. Louis Inter-Faith Committee for Latin America said ICE's Chicago Citizen's Academy course is another example that endorses 'white supremacy.'

    National Immigrant Justice Center's executive director, Heidi Altman, DailyMail.com that the training program will generate hatred towards the immigrant community as Trump seeks reelection.

    'It's no secret that this administration is interested in ways that they can use their agencies and use their agencies' resources to sow anti-immigrant sentiment and hatred and racism in communities,' said National Immigrant Justice Center's executive director, Heidi Altman in an interview with DailyMail.com. 'That is becoming more and more probable as we get closer to the election.'

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/art...moved-U-S.html
    “No matter how cynical I get, I just can't keep up.” – Lily Tomlin.




  7. #5032

    Re: A Chronicle of our Descent to Hades

    Suliso I think post #5031 is an example of the problems a new administration will face. The program can be ended on Jan 21 but the "training" will have already been done and the "trainees" will be scattered. What do you do? Round up everyone who participated? Disarm them? Stephen Miller is running amok and there is no one stopping him.
    “No matter how cynical I get, I just can't keep up.” – Lily Tomlin.




  8. #5033

    Re: A Chronicle of our Descent to Hades

    The strongest arm of the US gov is the judicial. As Ti explained, McConnell is loading judges with no proper credentials other than loyalty to Tiny/GOP in positions that are for life. With this, these judges will only have to bring down anything the Dems do for the stench of the administration to last a long time.
    Face it. It's the apocalypse.

  9. #5034

    Re: A Chronicle of our Descent to Hades

    Leading Homeland Security Under a President Who Embraces ‘Hate-Filled’ Talk
    Elaine Duke, a lifelong Republican, was acting secretary of homeland security for four months in 2017.

    By Michael D. Shear
    July 10, 2020

    WASHINGTON — Elaine C. Duke, then President Trump’s acting secretary of homeland security, arrived at the Roosevelt Room, down the hall from the Oval Office, on a steamy August afternoon in 2017 expecting a discussion about President Trump’s pledge to terminate DACA, the Obama-era protections for young immigrants. Instead, she said, it was “an ambush.”

    “The room was stacked,” she recalled. Stephen Miller, the architect of the president’s assault on immigration, Attorney General Jeff Sessions and other White House officials demanded that she sign a memo ending the program, which they had already concluded was illegal. She did not disagree, but she chafed at being cut out of the real decision-making.

    “President Trump believes that he can’t trust,” Ms. Duke, now a consultant, said in a wide-ranging interview about the 14 months she spent working for him and the consequences of the president’s suspicion of what he calls the “deep state” in government. “That has affected his ability to get counsel from diverse groups of people.”

    A veteran of nearly 30 years at the Departments of Homeland Security and Defense, Ms. Duke was the deputy secretary of homeland security in the summer of 2017 when John F. Kelly, Mr. Trump’s first secretary, left to become White House chief of staff. Ms. Duke served in the top job at the department until late 2017, when Kirstjen Nielsen was confirmed as Mr. Kelly’s permanent successor.

    A lifelong Republican who describes herself as “a kid from the Cleveland, Ohio, area,” Ms. Duke said she supported tougher enforcement of immigration laws, as long as it was tempered by a sense of humanity that she tried to exhibit when she volunteered to teach naturalization classes. But she described an administration that is often driven by ideology instead of deliberation, values politics over policy and is dominated by a president who embraces “hate-filled, angry and divisive” language.

    “We get distracted by slogans, by maybe words we heard like the president allegedly saying ‘Haiti is a shithole,’” Ms. Duke said from her home overlooking the Occoquan River about 25 minutes south of Washington. “So we get only spun up in that, and then we never get to the issue.”

    Ms. Duke is the latest in a series of senior officials who have gone public to describe — often in vivid, behind-the-scenes detail — their discomfort and sometimes shock at the inner workings of the Trump presidency. Like former Defense Secretary Jim Mattis, she chooses her words carefully. And like John R. Bolton, the former national security adviser who published a book titled “The Room Where It Happened,” Ms. Duke says she is not ready to commit to voting for Mr. Trump again.

    “That’s a really hard question,” she said. “But given the choices, I don’t know yet.”

    White House officials have long expressed displeasure with Ms. Duke’s short tenure as the chief of homeland security, describing her as unwilling to be a team player and resistant to the president’s agenda.

    (...)

    She said she supported the president’s efforts to tighten immigration security. But the president’s “America First” philosophy has veered toward “America Only,” she said.

    She said the president and Mr. Miller were right about lax immigration laws that needed to be fixed, but she said the policy of separating families along the border — which her successor approved months after she left — was discussed, and rejected, while she was acting secretary.

    “I think that we have the room to help people,” she said. “And one of the ways we have the room to help people is through our immigration system.”

    One of her fondest memories, she said, was helping pass out water to homeless people in the city of Ponce on Puerto Rico’s southern coast after Hurricane Maria, the devastating storm that struck there in the late summer of 2017. But the response to the storm by the president and his top aides was also a source of disappointment.

    She said that as Hurricane Maria approached Puerto Rico and Ms. Duke argued for an emergency declaration before its landfall, Mick Mulvaney, then the president’s budget director, resisted.

    “Quit being so emotional, Elaine, it’s not about the people, it’s about the money,” she said Mr. Mulvaney told her. Asked about the comment, Mr. Mulvaney said on Friday: “I never made such a remark. My experience with the acting director was that she rarely got anything right at D.H.S. At least she’s consistent.”

    The next day, Ms. Duke said she was pleased when the president himself expressed concern about the people of Puerto Rico. But she said she grew frustrated as Mr. Trump later traded angry tweets with the island’s politicians.

    “My thought process for both sides is all the negative energy is a distraction,” she said.

    Among her most searing moments during the response to the hurricanes came when she heard Mr. Trump raise the possibility of “divesting” or “selling” Puerto Rico as the island struggled to recover.

    “The president’s initial ideas were more of as a businessman, you know,” she recalled. “Can we outsource the electricity? Can we can we sell the island? You know, or divest of that asset?”

    She said the idea was never seriously considered or discussed after that meeting.


    Ms. Duke, a soft-spoken person with little experience in the raw political combat in Washington, said that she often found herself on the outside of a core group of White House advisers even though she was a member of the president’s cabinet.

    “There is a singular view that strength is mean,” she said, “that any kind of ability to collaborate, or not be angry is a weakness.”

    Ms. Duke recalled that Melania Trump, the first lady, was criticized after being photographed wearing high heels as she accompanied her husband to tour parts of flood-ravaged Texas.

    “We were talking,” Ms. Duke said, “and she said, ‘It’s the White House, and I will treat it with the respect and dignity it deserves and I will dress accordingly.’ And I thought that was beautiful.”

    Ms. Duke contrasted the first lady’s approach that day with Mr. Trump’s frequent use of harsh talk in person and on Twitter.

    “The office of the president,” she said, “should have a certain dignity to it that I think is important.”

    Her public comments — her first since leaving the administration two years ago — came just days after the Supreme Court invalidated the president’s decision in 2017 to terminate the DACA program, handing Mr. Trump one of his most humiliating legal defeats on a promise at the core of his political identity.

    Ms. Duke’s most lasting legacy is likely to be the memo she signed — under pressure — to end that program. Her decision not to cite any specific policy reasons was at the heart of the Supreme Court’s ruling, which said the Trump administration had failed to substantively consider the implications of terminating the program’s protections and benefits.

    Ms. Duke said she did not include policy reasons in the memo because she did not agree with the ideas being pushed by Mr. Miller and Mr. Sessions: that DACA amounted to an undeserved amnesty and that it would encourage new waves of illegal immigration.

    She said she still agreed that DACA “isn’t a legal program,” but hoped that Republicans and Democrats in Congress would eventually find a way to allow the undocumented immigrants covered by the program to live and work permanently in the United States.


    “What was missing for me is really that process of discussing it,” she said. “It is a grave decision not only from a legal standpoint but from the effect it will have on not just 700,000 people but 700,000 people plus their families.”

    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/10/u...ity-trump.html
    “No matter how cynical I get, I just can't keep up.” – Lily Tomlin.




  10. #5035

    Re: A Chronicle of our Descent to Hades

    He wanted to sell Puerto Rico and buy Greenland.
    “No matter how cynical I get, I just can't keep up.” – Lily Tomlin.




  11. #5036

    Re: A Chronicle of our Descent to Hades

    Right now it will not make a difference because of COVID. But it would be so great if for one week, on normal times, illegal immigrants would not show up for work in the USA. See how the economy works that week.
    Face it. It's the apocalypse.

  12. #5037

    Re: A Chronicle of our Descent to Hades

    The agricultural economy that is so important to the vast majority of the counties of Ohio would have to shut down completely. No more vegetables for anyone. GH

  13. #5038

    Re: A Chronicle of our Descent to Hades

    There's a play written by an African American decades ago called "Day of Absence". It's an interesting look at what would happen if Black people just stayed home.
    “No matter how cynical I get, I just can't keep up.” – Lily Tomlin.




  14. #5039

    Re: A Chronicle of our Descent to Hades

    UK tried something like that during this pandemic. Not full absence, but maybe 50%-70% reduction. Was a chaos and probably something didn't get picked, but somehow they adapted.
    Roger forever

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