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  1. #4501
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    Re: A Chronicle of our Descent to Hades

    Trump declares victory in the invented war on Christmas, and then invents a war on Thanksgiving.

    Sent from my SM-J737P using Tapatalk

  2. #4502

    Re: A Chronicle of our Descent to Hades

    Molly McKew
    @MollyMcKew
    Why is this not getting coverage?

    DHS set up a fake university in Detroit, with fake accreditation.

    Foreign students were given visas to attend. DHS collected millions of $$$ in tuition.

    Now 100s of students were arrested & deported bc school was fake. https://freep.com/story/news/local/m...it/4277686002/







    This is awful.
    There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life.”

    ― Frank Zappa





  3. #4503

    Re: A Chronicle of our Descent to Hades

    Trump Tax Records Reveal New Inconsistencies — This Time for Trump Tower
    Documents show the president’s company reported different numbers — higher ones to lenders, lower ones to tax officials — for Trump’s signature building. Last month, ProPublica revealed a similar pattern in two other Trump buildings.
    by Heather Vogell Nov. 27, 4 a.m. EST

    Donald Trump’s business reported conflicting information about a key metric to New York City property tax officials and a lender who arranged financing for his signature building, Trump Tower in Manhattan, according to tax and loan documents obtained by ProPublica. The findings add a third major Trump property to two for which ProPublica revealed similar discrepancies last month.

    In the latest case, the occupancy rate of the Trump Tower’s commercial space was listed, over three consecutive years, as 11, 16 and 16 percentage points higher in filings to a lender than in reports to city tax officials, records show.

    For example, as of December 2011 and June 2012, respectively, Trump’s business told the lender that 99% and 98.7% of the tower’s commercial space was occupied, according to a prospectus for the loan. The figures were taken from “borrower financials,” the prospectus stated.

    In tax filings, however, Trump’s business said the building’s occupancy was 83% in January 2012 and the same a year later. The 16 percentage point gap between the loan and tax filings is a “very significant difference,” said Susan Mancuso, an attorney who specializes in New York property tax.

    A spokesperson for the Trump Organization said that “comparing the various reports is comparing apples to oranges” because reporting requirements differ.

    Trump had much to gain by showing a high occupancy rate to lenders in 2012: He refinanced his share of Trump Tower that year and obtained a $100 million loan on favorable terms.

    The vast majority of the gap between occupancy figures could be explained by diverging reports on how much space the Trump Organization used in Trump Tower. In loan documents, the company said it and its affiliates occupied 74,900 square feet in mid-2012, or 31% of the building. But tax reports from the January before and after listed the company and related parties as occupying 41,600 square feet — or about 18% of the tower.

    “I cannot give you an explanation,” said Kevin Riordan, a financing expert, former accountant and real estate professor at Montclair State University who reviewed the tax and loan records for Trump Tower at ProPublica’s request.

    More than a dozen tax and finance experts, presented with ProPublica’s earlier findings, also said they could not decipher a reason for the differences. As with Trump Tower, the discrepancies made the two properties — a skyscraper located at 40 Wall Street and the Trump International Hotel and Tower near Columbus Circle — appear more profitable to the lender and less so to property tax officials.

    Those discrepancies were “versions of fraud,” according to Nancy Wallace, a professor of finance and real estate at the Haas School of Business at the University of California-Berkeley. The penalties for false filings can include fines or criminal charges.

    The diverging numbers match a pattern described by Michael Cohen, Trump’s former lawyer, in congressional testimony this year. Cohen said Trump at times inflated assets’ value in documents submitted to lenders in an effort to secure loans. In reports to tax officials, Cohen testified, Trump would lower the value to reduce what he owed.

    The focus on Trump’s business and personal financial records has been particularly intense of late. Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance Jr. has subpoenaed a wide array of Trump financial records to investigate claims that the Trump Organization falsified records of hush-money payments to pornographic film actress Stormy Daniels, who said she and Trump had a sexual encounter. (He has denied the affair.)

    Congressional lawmakers are seeking Trump’s personal tax returns, as well as other financial information, as part of their investigation into potential foreign influence on the presidency. Two federal courts have affirmed lawmakers’ right to enforce the subpoenas, and Trump has appealed to the U.S. Supreme Court.

    ProPublica used New York’s Freedom of Information Law to obtain property tax filings for four of Trump’s Manhattan buildings, including Trump Tower. The income and expense statements Trump filed when repeatedly appealing the city’s valuation of his property are public under the law. We then compared information in the tax reports to loan data made public when Trump’s debt became part of pools of loans sold publicly as bonds known as commercial mortgage-backed securities.

    Information in tax and loan filings can differ for legitimate reasons, experts said. A small portion of the occupancy gap at Trump Tower did appear to have an explanation: About 2.5 percentage points of the discrepancy in 2012 consisted of an instance where the Trump Organization treated newly leased, but still empty, space as full in its loan documents (which Trump’s lender disclosed) but not in tax documents.

    The Trump Organization refinanced Trump Tower in 2012, replacing its existing $27 million in debt with a loan for $100 million. That allowed Trump to extract about $68 million in cash. The same institution that handled the refinancing, Ladder Capital, refinanced 40 Wall Street and the Columbus Circle property a few years later.


    https://www.propublica.org/article/t...nconsistencies
    There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life.”

    ― Frank Zappa





  4. #4504

    Re: A Chronicle of our Descent to Hades

    I know it seems naοve to say this but the sheer breadth, the volume of criminality is breathtaking. How did the Republicans allow him to run?!
    There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life.”

    ― Frank Zappa





  5. #4505

    Re: A Chronicle of our Descent to Hades

    ....and how is any slightly educated person not feeling like he needs to be kicked out yesterday.

    What bugs me most is that the current impeachment hearings, to be followed, I feel sure, by a trial in the Senate, will come to absolutely nothing, because there is almost a 0% chance that sufficient Republicans will turn against him to oust him from office. That despite "the sheer breadth, the volume of criminality."

    GH

  6. #4506

    Re: A Chronicle of our Descent to Hades

    Brandi Buchman
    @BBuchman_CNS
    Replying to
    @BBuchman_CNS
    and
    @CourthouseNews

    NEW: The Trump campaign's onetime informal adviser & key witness for the Mueller probe, George Aref Nader, lost his motion to dismiss a count of transporting a minor for sex, per a ruling from Judge Leonie Brinkema at EDVA.

    More to come for @CourthouseNews


    .
    There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life.”

    ― Frank Zappa





  7. #4507

    Re: A Chronicle of our Descent to Hades

    Russia Inquiry Review Is Expected to Undercut Trump Claim of F.B.I. Spying
    The F.B.I. never tried to place undercover agents or informants inside the Trump campaign, a highly anticipated inspector general’s report is expected to find.

    By Adam Goldman
    Nov. 27, 2019, 2:34 p.m. ET

    WASHINGTON — The Justice Department’s inspector general found no evidence that the F.B.I. attempted to place undercover agents or informants inside Donald J. Trump’s campaign in 2016 as agents investigated whether his associates conspired with Russia's election interference operation, people familiar with a draft of the inspector general’s report said.

    The determination by the inspector general, Michael E. Horowitz, is expected to be a key finding in his highly anticipated report due out on Dec. 9 examining aspects of the Russia investigation. The finding also contradicts some of the most inflammatory accusations hurled by Mr. Trump and his supporters, who alleged not only that F.B.I. officials spied on the Trump campaign but also at one point that former President Barack Obama had ordered Mr. Trump’s phones tapped. The startling accusation generated headlines but Mr. Trump never backed it up.

    The finding is one of several by Mr. Horowitz that undercuts conservatives’ claims that the F.B.I. acted improperly in investigating several Trump associates starting in 2016. He also found that F.B.I. leaders did not take politically motivated actions in pursuing a secret wiretap on a former Trump campaign adviser, Carter Page — eavesdropping that Mr. Trump’s allies have long decried as politically motivated.

    But Mr. Horowitz will sharply criticize F.B.I. leaders for their handling of the investigation in some ways, and he unearthed errors and omissions when F.B.I. officials applied for the wiretap, according to people familiar with a draft of the report. The draft contained a chart listing numerous mistakes in the process, one of the people said.

    Mr. Horowitz concluded that the F.B.I. was careless and unprofessional in pursuing the Page wiretap, and he referred his findings in one instance to prosecutors for potential criminal charges over the alteration of a document in 2017 by a front-line lawyer, Kevin Clinesmith, 37, in connection with the wiretap application.

    Mr. Horowitz’s mixed bag of conclusions is likely to give new ammunition to both Mr. Trump’s defenders and critics in the long-running partisan fight over the Russia investigation. Last week, Mr. Trump described the coming report in a phone interview with “Fox & Friends” as potentially “historic” and predicted “perhaps the biggest scandal in the history of our country.”


    A spokeswoman for Mr. Horowitz declined to comment. The people familiar with the inquiry cautioned that the draft report was not final. The New York Times has not reviewed the draft, which could include other significant findings.

    Mr. Trump has long chafed at the Russia investigation, which overshadowed the first years of his presidency. Ultimately, the special counsel who took over the Russia inquiry, Robert S. Mueller III, found insufficient evidence to charge any Trump associates with conspiring with Russia’s interference.

    But the president’s allies have seized on the F.B.I.’s conduct in opening the inquiry as potentially problematic. Attorney General William P. Barr prompted alarm among defenders of the F.B.I. by accusing the bureau this year of spying on the campaign.

    The F.B.I. director, Christopher A. Wray, who was appointed in 2017, has said he would not use the term spying to describe F.B.I. activities in 2016. The Mueller report reaffirmed the factors that the F.B.I. used to open its investigation, and Mr. Horowitz’s findings are also said to show that the F.B.I. acted properly in opening the inquiry.

    F.B.I. officials started the investigation, code-named Crossfire Hurricane, in July 2016 after learning that a Russian intermediary had offered information that could damage Hillary Clinton to a Trump campaign aide, George Papadopoulos. The F.B.I. eventually began looking at four Trump campaign advisers who had ties to Russia, including Mr. Papadopoulos, and as law enforcement and intelligence officials were realizing the extent of the Kremlin’s ongoing campaign to sabotage the election.

    The F.B.I. was cognizant of being seen as interfering with a presidential campaign, and former law enforcement officials are adamant that they did not investigate the Trump campaign organization itself or target it for infiltration. But agents had to investigate the four advisers’ ties with Russia, and the people they did scrutinize all played roles in the Trump campaign.

    Mr. Trump and his allies have pointed to some of the investigative steps the F.B.I. took as evidence of spying, though they were typical law enforcement activities. For one, agents had an informant, an academic named Stefan A. Halper, meet with Mr. Page and Mr. Papadopoulos while they were affiliated with the campaign. The president decried the revelation as an “all time biggest political scandal” when it emerged last year.

    The F.B.I. did have an undercover agent who posed as Mr. Halper’s assistant during a London meeting with Mr. Papadopoulos in August 2016. And indeed, another Trump adviser, Peter Navarro, reportedly pushed Mr. Halper for an ambassadorship in the Trump administration.

    Mr. Halper turned down the job and told the F.B.I. that Mr. Navarro had made the overture, according to a person familiar with the offer.


    Mr. Horowitz found no evidence that Mr. Halper tried to infiltrate the Trump campaign itself, the people familiar with the draft report said, such as by seeking inside campaign information or a role in the organization. The F.B.I. also never directed him to do so, former officials said. Instead, Mr. Halper focused on eliciting information from Mr. Page and Mr. Papadopoulos about their ties to Russia.

    Mr. Barr has suggested that the F.B.I. assigned other informants as well to figure out whether any Trump associates were working with the Russians. The F.B.I. gave Mr. Horowitz’s team extraordinary access to its informant database, and his investigators examined other F.B.I. informants with possible ties to the Trump campaign.

    In each case, they found that the F.B.I. had not deployed those people to gather information on the Trump campaign itself, the people said.

    It is also possible that the F.B.I. received unsolicited material from inside the Trump campaign; outsiders often submit potential evidence to the bureau that agents did not seek. But it is not clear whether Mr. Horowitz uncovered any such instances.

    Mr. Horowitz will also undercut another claim by Trump allies — that the Russian intermediary who promised dirt to Mr. Papadopoulos, a Maltese professor named Joseph Mifsud, was an F.B.I. informant. Mr. Papadopoulos has helped spread that claim; he contends without evidence that the F.B.I. or the C.I.A. set him up to derail Mr. Trump’s campaign.

    (...)

    The report is also expected to debunk another theory of Trump allies: that the F.B.I. relied on information to open the investigation from a British former spy, Christopher Steele, himself a onetime bureau informant who compiled a dossier of damaging, unverified information on Mr. Trump.

    (...)

    Mr. Horowitz plans to say that the wiretap application, which referenced Mr. Papadopoulos, should have also included a statement he made to the undercover agent in London that could be seen as exculpatory or self-serving, the people familiar with the draft report said. Mr. Papadopoulos said at the time that he had nothing to do with Russia and knew no one else who did, he recounted in a book he has written.

    (...)

    In addition, the inspector general examined Mr. Steele’s contacts with Bruce G. Ohr, a Justice Department official and an expert on Russian organized crime. Mr. Ohr, himself a target of Mr. Trump’s ire, spoke with Mr. Steele several times after the F.B.I. terminated its relationship with him in the fall of 2016 because he spoke with a reporter about his concerns about Mr. Trump. Mr. Ohr relayed information from those conversations to the bureau.

    Mr. Horowitz is expected to criticize Mr. Ohr for keeping his meetings with Mr. Steele from his superiors.

    The report will mark the end of one chapter of the Justice Department’s scrutiny of the F.B.I.’s handling of the Russia investigation, though the saga is ongoing. Mr. Barr has assigned the United States attorney for Connecticut, John H. Durham, to also examine the origins of the inquiry and the government’s collection of intelligence involving the Trump campaign’s interactions with Russians.


    Michael S. Schmidt contributed reporting.


    https://www.nytimes.com/2019/11/27/u...r-general.html
    There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life.”

    ― Frank Zappa





  8. #4508

    Re: A Chronicle of our Descent to Hades

    Ben Collins
    @oneunderscore__

    The crux of The Epoch Times’ millions of dollars in pro-Trump Facebook ads, countless A-block primetime Fox News segments, and the premise of QAnon hinged on this report showing the opposite of what it will actually show.

    This galaxy brain nonsense is now for naught.

    The Epoch Times spent millions in targeted ads on Facebook and YouTube, telling people the president was setup and the truth would come out soon.

    It was mailed to physical mailboxes, even dropped off at libraries, and it’s not true.

    It isn’t over. Like all conspiracy theories, groups like QAnon will find a new great hope, another open-ended investigation or unsolved crime to pin their hopes on.

    It’s how doomsday cults work. Every bit of academic research shows the same thing—being wrong strengthens resolve.
    There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life.”

    ― Frank Zappa





  9. #4509

    Re: A Chronicle of our Descent to Hades

    Ti's postings are so fast and so diversified about all the corruption going on in the USA that I just can't comment anymore.
    But about that university thing: you tell me that the Vennie govt, the Colombian Govt or the Argie govt did that and I will say "Nah, no way. We may be corrupt but not that much"
    That is downright sickening. Which is an incredible thing to post in this thread.
    Missing winter...

  10. #4510
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    Re: A Chronicle of our Descent to Hades

    Quote Originally Posted by ponchi101 View Post
    Ti's postings are so fast and so diversified about all the corruption going on in the USA that I just can't comment anymore.
    But about that university thing: you tell me that the Vennie govt, the Colombian Govt or the Argie govt did that and I will say "Nah, no way. We may be corrupt but not that much"
    That is downright sickening. Which is an incredible thing to post in this thread.
    What I don't understand is what DHS was trying to accomplish by setting up a fake university. Did they assume radical islamists would enroll in droves--but didn't?
    Winston, a.k.a. Alvena Rae Risley Hiatt (1944-2019), RIP

  11. #4511

    Re: A Chronicle of our Descent to Hades

    Quote Originally Posted by dryrunguy View Post
    What I don't understand is what DHS was trying to accomplish by setting up a fake university. Did they assume radical islamists would enroll in droves--but didn't?
    I think they were going after Indian/Chinese students who're desperate to come/stay in US and would enroll in a diploma mill kind of places to do so. Still this sounds like an entrapment to me.
    Roger forever

  12. #4512

    Re: A Chronicle of our Descent to Hades

    Trump loses appeal to block Deutsche Bank, Capital One from handing his financial records to Congress
    PUBLISHED TUE, DEC 3 201910:29 AM ESTUPDATED 2 HOURS AGO
    Kevin Breuninger
    Tucker Higgins

    KEY POINTS

    A federal appeals court rules that Deutsche Bank and Capital One must hand over years of President Trump’s financial records in compliance with House Democrats’ subpoenas.

    The ruling marks another loss in the courts for Trump, who has vigorously fought off efforts by lawmakers and prosecutors seeking details about his finances.

    The case is likely destined for the Supreme Court, where the president has already appealed two other lower court decisions requiring the disclosure of his financial records.

    https://www.cnbc.com/2019/12/03/trum...-congress.html
    There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life.”

    ― Frank Zappa





  13. #4513

    Re: A Chronicle of our Descent to Hades

    William Barr says ‘communities’ that protest cops could lose ‘the police protection they need’
    By
    Tim Elfrink
    Dec. 4, 2019 at 4:38 a.m. EST

    Speaking to a roomful of police officers and prosecutors on Tuesday, Attorney General William P. Barr drew a parallel between protests against soldiers during the Vietnam War and demonstrations against law enforcement today.

    But this time, he suggested, those who don’t show “respect” to authority could lose access to police services.

    “Today, the American people have to focus on something else, which is the sacrifice and the service that is given by our law enforcement officers. And they have to start showing, more than they do, the respect and support that law enforcement deserves,” Barr said in pointed remarks delivered at a Justice Department ceremony to honor police officers.

    Barr added that “if communities don’t give that support and respect, they might find themselves without the police protection they need.”


    Although Barr didn’t specify what “communities” he was referencing, activists decried his speech as a clear attack on minorities who have protested police brutality and other racially skewed law enforcement abuses.

    “Barr’s words are as revealing as they are disturbing ― flagrantly dismissive of the rights of Americans of color, disrespectful to countless law enforcement officers who work hard to serve their communities, and full of a continuing disregard for the rule of law,” Jeb Fain, a spokesperson for liberal super PAC American Bridge, told HuffPost, which first reported on the comments.

    As attorney general, Barr has attacked liberal district attorneys who have pushed for police accountability in cities like Philadelphia and St. Louis and suggested that there should be “zero tolerance for resisting police.”

    Before handing out honors to police officers at Tuesday’s ceremony for the Attorney General’s Award for Distinguished Service in Policing, Barr described seeing deployed troops celebrated at airports and lamented that police aren’t more openly feted.

    “When police officers roll out of their precincts every morning, there are no crowds along the highway cheering them on, and when you go home at the end of the day, there’s no ticker-tape parade,” he said, echoing virtually word-for-word comments he made in August to the Fraternal Order of Police.

    The attorney general then compared police to Vietnam-era soldiers returning home to face those opposed to the conflict.

    “In the Vietnam era, our country learned a lesson. I remember that our brave troops who served in that conflict weren’t treated very well in many cases when they came home, and sometimes they bore the brunt of people who were opposed to the war,” he said. “The respect and gratitude owed to them was not given. And it took decades for the American people finally to realize that.”

    Similarly, he suggested, Americans should stop protesting police officers “fighting an unrelenting, never-ending fight against criminal predators in our society.”

    Critics questioned Barr’s suggestion in the speech that police could stop protecting those who protest them.

    “US Attorney General fails to understand police are not a protection racket,” tweeted Andrew Stroehlein, the European media director for Human Rights Watch. “(And no points for guessing which ‘communities’ he means).”


    The Justice Department didn’t immediately respond to a message about Barr’s comments.


    https://www.washingtonpost.com/natio...munities-race/
    There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life.”

    ― Frank Zappa





  14. #4514
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    Re: A Chronicle of our Descent to Hades

    That is precisely what happens when your brain is small and limits you to either/or thinking. It is possible to respect law enforcement and detest/speak out against their bad apples simultaneously. But no... Small brains cannot allow this.
    Winston, a.k.a. Alvena Rae Risley Hiatt (1944-2019), RIP

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