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  1. #16

    Re: The Sports Doping Thread

    I have succeeded. I stopped watching the Olympics after Greece. I stopped watching baseball after A-Rod was found to have doped for the 1000TH time and was given another slap on the hand. I refuse to watch the Tour De France. I watch football because, after all, the NFL hardly masks the fact that they allow doping.
    I stopped watching F1 because of the corruption and the simply fact that it is the car, not the driver. And I stopped watching the Soccer World Cup (no big deal because I don't like soccer too much) again because of the corruption.
    And since I never watch Sharapova's matches, I have been spared of watching a doped athlete play tennis.
    I am clean.
    Starry starry night

  2. #17

    Re: The Sports Doping Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by ponchi101 View Post
    I have succeeded. I stopped watching the Olympics after Greece. I stopped watching baseball after A-Rod was found to have doped for the 1000TH time and was given another slap on the hand. I refuse to watch the Tour De France. I watch football because, after all, the NFL hardly masks the fact that they allow doping.
    I stopped watching F1 because of the corruption and the simply fact that it is the car, not the driver. And I stopped watching the Soccer World Cup (no big deal because I don't like soccer too much) again because of the corruption.
    And since I never watch Sharapova's matches, I have been spared of watching a doped athlete play tennis.
    I am clean.
    As Patrick Mouratoglu would say #proud
    "Even if you dance for your enemy on the rock, he will accuse you of splashing water on him." ~ African Proverb




  3. #18
    Everyday Warrior MJ2004's Avatar
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    Re: The Sports Doping Thread

    Nice, Russia. Throw your athletes under the bus.


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  4. #19
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    Re: The Sports Doping Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by ponchi101 View Post
    I have succeeded. I stopped watching the Olympics after Greece. I stopped watching baseball after A-Rod was found to have doped for the 1000TH time and was given another slap on the hand. I refuse to watch the Tour De France. I watch football because, after all, the NFL hardly masks the fact that they allow doping.
    I stopped watching F1 because of the corruption and the simply fact that it is the car, not the driver. And I stopped watching the Soccer World Cup (no big deal because I don't like soccer too much) again because of the corruption.
    And since I never watch Sharapova's matches, I have been spared of watching a doped athlete play tennis.
    I am clean.
    Fast-forward 10 years and you're exclusively watching curling (please don't break my heart and tell me there's doping in curling!)


  5. #20
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    Re: The Sports Doping Thread

    Of course there is:

    Danish curler Test Positive

  6. #21

    Re: The Sports Doping Thread

    And I actually like curling
    Starry starry night

  7. #22
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    Re: The Sports Doping Thread

    Me too (much to one of my coworkers chagrin.)

  8. #23

    Re: The Sports Doping Thread

    Dozens of Olympians Could Be Barred From Rio Games
    By REBECCA R. RUIZ MAY 17, 2016

    Dozens of athletes expecting to compete at the coming Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro could be barred from the Games, the International Olympic Committee announced on Tuesday.

    The I.O.C. retested 454 doping samples from the 2008 Summer Games in Beijing, it said, discovering suspicious results among 31 athletes from 12 countries and six sports. The athletes were not publicly identified on Tuesday. The countries in question will be notified in coming days, according to a spokesman.

    Another 250 doping samples from the 2012 Summer Games in London are due to be retested, officials said, announcing broad scrutiny of athletes who have competed in recent Olympic Games.

    The announcement came in the wake of a detailed account last week by the former longtime director of Russia’s antidoping lab, Grigory Rodchenkov, who said he worked for years at the direction of the Russian government to help the country’s top athletes use banned, performance-enhancing substances and go undetected.

    Dr. Rodchenkov told The New York Times that Russian athletes had doped leading up to the 2008 Beijing Games, the 2012 London Games and throughout the course of the 2014 Sochi Games, when Russia controlled the Olympic testing laboratory. He described an overnight operation in which he and a small team had substituted Russian athletes’ tainted urine for clean urine, stockpiled in the months leading up to competition and passed surreptitiously through a hole in the wall of the lab building.

    Reacting to that account, the I.O.C. called a special meeting of its executive board, which convened by phone on Tuesday. In a statement released after that call, the I.O.C. addressed Dr. Rodchenkov’s claims, repeating its calls for the World Anti-Doping Agency to initiate “a fully fledged investigation into allegations that testing at the Sochi Laboratory was subverted.”

    After his account was made public, Dr. Rodchenkov wrote a letter to WADA and the I.O.C. last week, offering to guide investigators in their scrutiny of Russian athletes’ samples from the Sochi Games to verify his account. While retesting those samples would show no traces of banned drugs, he said, the table salt he added to the urine samples in question, to mask certain inconsistencies, would confirm his story.

    On Tuesday, the I.O.C. promised its cooperation with an investigation into the Sochi testing operation, noting that it would instruct the laboratory in Lausanne, Switzerland, where the urine samples of Sochi medalists are stored, to assist WADA with any analysis it might undertake.

    Last Friday, a spokeswoman for WADA said that the organization was determining its path forward and did not give any indication of how officials might proceed in looking into Dr. Rodchenkov’s story.

    “The measures we are taking following the worrying allegations against the laboratory in Sochi are another major step to protect the clean athletes irrespective of any sport or nation,” Thomas Bach, president of the I.O.C., said on Tuesday. “Dopers have no place to hide.”

    But even with new scrutiny of athletes’ past performance and the possible ejection of Olympians who have doped from the Rio Games, which start on Aug. 5, questions hang over the Olympic drug-testing operation.

    The glass bottles used since 2000 to store athletes’ urine at the Games have long been hailed as tamper-proof. According to Dr. Rodchenkov, however, the Russian intelligence service was able to break into them and go undetected.

    And like the Moscow lab that Dr. Rodchenkov ran, the Rio laboratory that will handle testing at the Games has a history of falling out of favor with global antidoping authorities.

    The lab’s accreditation was revoked by WADA in 2013 and restored just last year, in preparation for the Olympics. Even amid economic and political turmoil, the Brazilian government has committed roughly 200 million Brazilian real, or about $60 million, to outfitting the lab with the latest scientific equipment.

    Still, according to Dr. Rodchenkov, even with cutting-edge equipment and dozens of lab staff from around the world, the integrity of an antidoping lab cannot be guaranteed.

    “People are celebrating Olympic champion winners, but we are sitting crazy and replacing their urine,” Dr. Rodchenkov said, reflecting on the nights he spent secretly working in a storage closet at the Sochi Games. “Can you imagine how Olympic sport is organized?”

    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/18/sp...=tw-share&_r=0
    "Even if you dance for your enemy on the rock, he will accuse you of splashing water on him." ~ African Proverb




  9. #24
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    Re: The Sports Doping Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by ptmcmahon View Post
    Of course there is:

    Danish curler Test Positive

    DAMMIT!


  10. #25
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    Re: The Sports Doping Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by mmmm8 View Post
    Fast-forward 10 years and you're exclusively watching curling (please don't break my heart and tell me there's doping in curling!)
    Quote Originally Posted by ptmcmahon View Post
    Of course there is:

    Danish curler Test Positive
    Quote Originally Posted by mmmm8 View Post
    DAMMIT!
    It sounds like a failed test due to fertility treatments that isn't being treated as overly serious, but did result in a mandatory ban of the player. (Still funny)
    I disapprove of this message

  11. #26

    Re: The Sports Doping Thread

    I do still watch albeit mostly Winter Olympics since majority of Summer sports don't interest me at all. Plus there are too many events to follow them all.
    Roger forever

  12. #27

    Re: The Sports Doping Thread

    Can't believe we got onto curling. I have been a long-time curling fan. I have twice traveled to Europe largely to attend the European Curling Championships......once in Champery, Switzerland, and once in Karlstad, Sweden. Each time, the trip involved other issues, but the exact timing was planned to allow me to attend those curling events. I have been to other things on this continent. I have yet to attend a world championship, and there is a reason.....the men's and women's world's are held in different places each year. The men's and women's A and B group European Championships are in one place (though the A and B groups are always in different facilities), so there is more curling to see, with competition by both genders.

    Relative to doping and cheating in sports: Curling is a favorite of mine for various reasons. I do love the strategy and skill involved. But also, I have loved the objective nature of results and the feeling, at all levels, that incredibly little cheating occurs, whether from doping or otherwise. But I have a story about that: I once had a very heart-to-heart talk with a friend who became a very high official in the Russian Curling Federation (can't give a name). I asked him about cheating in Russian sports. Totally off the record, he said that the Russian curling teams are under a lot of pressure to perform well internationally, especially at the Olympics, but are under no pressure to cheat. BUT, he freely admitted that Russian sports federations in which cheating is possible are under considerable pressure to cheat if necessary to get the desired medals. I was amazed that he admitted what seemed to me to be obvious.

    So I think if you like curling for the relative cleanliness of the sport, you are not doing so in vain.

    GH

  13. #28

    Re: The Sports Doping Thread

    There is not much money involved in curling hence much reduced incentive to cheat...
    Roger forever

  14. #29

    Re: The Sports Doping Thread

    Justice Department Opens Investigation Into Russian Doping Scandal
    By REBECCA R. RUIZ MAY 17, 2016


    Russia’s sports minister, Vitaly Mutko, has said Russian officials, coaches and athletes have made “serious mistakes,” but he has not outlined them or admitted to any state involvement. Credit Sergei Savostyanov\TASS, via Getty Images

    The United States Department of Justice has opened an investigation into state-sponsored doping by dozens of Russia’s top athletes, according to two people familiar with the case. The inquiry escalates what has been a roiling sports controversy into a federal criminal case involving foreign officials.

    The United States attorney’s office for the Eastern District of New York is scrutinizing Russian government officials, athletes, coaches, antidoping authorities and anyone who might have benefited unfairly from a doping regime, according to the people, who did not have authorization to speak about the inquiry publicly. Prosecutors are believed to be pursuing conspiracy and fraud charges.

    Federal courts have allowed prosecutors to bring cases against foreigners living abroad if there is some connection to the United States. That connection can be limited, such as the use of an American bank.

    A report published by the World Anti-Doping Agency in November accused Russia of systematic state-sponsored doping. The chemist identified as a linchpin in that operation — Grigory Rodchenkov, the longtime head of Russia’s antidoping laboratory — told The New York Times this month that he worked for years, at the direction of the Russian government, to help the country’s athletes use banned, performance-enhancing substances in global competition and go undetected.

    He is among the people under scrutiny by the United States government, according to someone with direct knowledge of the case who spoke on condition of anonymity.

    Russian officials have responded to the allegations with both defiance and contrition. While often emphatically dismissing the claims as a Western conspiracy intended to discredit Russia, they have sometimes struck a more conciliatory tone, perhaps seeking to win the favor of sports officials in control of the country’s ability to compete in the coming Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro.

    (...)

    In their inquiry, United States prosecutors are expected to scrutinize anyone who might have facilitated unclean competition in the United States or used the United States banking system to conduct a doping program.

    Elite Russian athletes have competed in several major sporting events in the United States, like the Boston Marathon and international bobsled and skeleton championships in Lake Placid, N.Y.

    The inquiry, which originated with the Federal Bureau of Investigation, would have to clear several hurdles before charges could be filed. Even if prosecutors are able to establish jurisdiction, securing the cooperation of Russian authorities in pursuing evidence and witnesses — and in ultimately delivering any charged defendants to the United States — would be all but impossible.

    It is rare for the United States government to take on sports doping cases. In February 2012, the United States attorney in Los Angeles, André Birotte Jr., dropped a two-year criminal investigation into Lance Armstrong and his Postal Service cycling team that had explored whether Mr. Armstrong and others defrauded sponsors by operating a doping program.

    The United States Anti-Doping Agency, not a government entity, pursued the case. It ultimately stripped Mr. Armstrong of his seven Tour de France titles and barred him from cycling for life for “the most sophisticated, professionalized and successful doping program that sport has ever seen.”

    But prosecutors for the Eastern District in Brooklyn have taken on high-profile sports corruption cases before. For several years, the office has been investigating corruption within FIFA, world soccer’s governing body. That case, announced last May, has so far resulted in charges against 40 soccer officials and business executives, as well as two corporations. More than a third have pleaded guilty.

    Highly international in scope, the FIFA case has implicated people of two dozen nationalities, and it has required the cooperation of various foreign authorities — especially the Swiss — in making arrests, ruling on extradition requests and sharing information about bank transactions.

    While the Eastern District’s FIFA investigation and Russian doping investigation are independent inquiries, there is overlap between the two matters. Prosecutors from the business and securities fraud section and the organized crime division are involved in both, and certain public figures have overlapping ties to Russian sports and global soccer.

    Mr. Mutko, Russia’s minister of sport, is a member of FIFA’s ruling council, a position he has held since 2009. He was appointed to his current role in Russian government by President Vladimir V. Putin in 2008.

    In his account to The Times, Dr. Rodchenkov, who oversaw Russia’s antidoping lab in Moscow for a decade, said he often took direct orders from Mr. Mutko’s deputy, Yuri Nagornykh, especially leading up to the Sochi Olympics in 2014. In Sochi, Dr. Rodchenkov said, he staged an elaborate dark-of-night operation to destroy Russian athletes’ tainted urine on orders from the government.

    In a news conference last Friday, Mr. Nagornykh disputed Dr. Rodchenkov’s claims. “There’s no doping program in Russian sport,” he said. “There was none and will be none.”

    In the wake of the report last fall, which cast shadows on not just the Moscow laboratory but also Russia’s antidoping agency, Dr. Rodchenkov said that Mr. Mutko summoned him to the sports ministry’s headquarters and requested his resignation. Dr. Rodchenkov fled to the United States, fearing for his safety, he said.

    Bradley D. Simon, a criminal defense lawyer of Simon and Partners in New York, confirmed that he was representing Dr. Rodchenkov but declined to comment on the Justice Department investigation.

    Currently living in Los Angeles, Dr. Rodchenkov, 57, has said he has no intention of returning to Russia. “I have no choice,” he said in a recent interview. “I am between two flames.”

    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/05/18/sp...pgtype=article
    "Even if you dance for your enemy on the rock, he will accuse you of splashing water on him." ~ African Proverb




  15. #30
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    Re: The Sports Doping Thread

    Loretta Lynch has got to be the most activist DOJ head in recent history.


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