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  1. #1

    2016 Academy Awards

    Oscar Nominations: The Complete List

    Best Picture

    The Big Short
    Bridge of Spies
    Brooklyn
    Mad Max: Fury Road
    The Martian
    The Revenant
    Room
    Spotlight

    Performance by an actor in a leading role
    Bryan Cranston, Trumbo
    Matt Damon, The Martian
    Leonardo DiCaprio, The Revenant
    Michael Fassbender, Steve Jobs
    Eddie Redmayne, The Danish Girl

    Performance by an actress in a leading role
    Cate Blanchett, Carol
    Brie Larson, Room
    Jennifer Lawrence, Joy
    Charlotte Rampling, 45 Years
    Saoirse Ronan, Brooklyn

    Best director
    Adam McKay, The Big Short
    George Miller, Mad Max
    Alejandro Inarritu, The Revenant
    Lenny Abrahamson, Room
    Tom McCarthy, Spotlight

    Performance by an actor in a supporting role
    Christian Bale, The Big Short
    Tom Hardy, The Revenant
    Mark Ruffalo, Spotlight
    Mark Rylance, The Bridge of Spies
    Sylvester Stallone, Creed

    Performance by an actress in a supporting role
    Jennifer Jason Leigh, The Hateful Eight
    Rooney Mara, Carol
    Rachel McAdams, Spotlight
    Alicia Vikander, The Danish Girl
    Kate Winslet, Steve Jobs

    Best documentary feature
    Amy, Asif Kapadia and James Gay-Rees
    Cartel Land, Matthew Heineman and Tom Yellin
    The Look of Silence, Joshua Oppenheimer and Signe Byrge Sørensen
    What Happened, Miss Simone?, Liz Garbus, Amy Hobby and Justin Wilkes
    Winter on Fire: Ukraine’s Fight for Freedom, Evgeny Afineevsky and Den Tolmor

    Best documentary short subject
    Body Team 12, David Darg and Bryn Mooser
    Chau, beyond the Lines, Courtney Marsh and Jerry Franck
    Claude Lanzmann: Spectres of the Shoah, Adam Benzine
    A Girl in the River: The Price of Forgiveness, Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy
    Last Day of Freedom, Dee Hibbert-Jones and Nomi Talisman

    Achievement in film editing
    The Big Short, Hank Corwin
    Mad Max: Fury Road, Margaret Sixel
    The Revenant, Stephen Mirrione
    Spotlight, Tom McArdle
    Star Wars: The Force Awakens, Maryann Brandon and Mary Jo Markey

    Best foreign language film of the year
    “Embrace of the Serpent” Colombia
    “Mustang” France
    “Son of Saul” Hungary
    “Theeb” Jordan
    “A War” Denmark

    Achievement in makeup and hairstyling
    “Mad Max: Fury Road” Lesley Vanderwalt, Elka Wardega and Damian Martin
    “The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed out the Window and Disappeared” Love Larson and Eva von Bahr
    “The Revenant” Siân Grigg, Duncan Jarman and Robert Pandini

    Achievement in music written for motion pictures (Original score)
    “Bridge of Spies” Thomas Newman
    “Carol” Carter Burwell
    “The Hateful Eight” Ennio Morricone
    “Sicario” Jóhann Jóhannsson
    “Star Wars: The Force Awakens” John Williams

    Achievement in music written for motion pictures (Original song)
    “Earned It” from “Fifty Shades of Grey”
    Music and Lyric by Abel Tesfaye, Ahmad Balshe, Jason Daheala Quenneville and Stephan Moccio
    “Manta Ray” from “Racing Extinction”
    Music by J. Ralph and Lyric by Antony Hegarty
    “Simple Song #3” from “Youth”
    Music and Lyric by David Lang
    “Til It Happens To You” from “The Hunting Ground”
    Music and Lyric by Diane Warren and Lady Gaga
    “Writing’s On The Wall” from “Spectre”
    Music and Lyric by Jimmy Napes and Sam Smith

    Best motion picture of the year
    “The Big Short” Brad Pitt, Dede Gardner and Jeremy Kleiner, Producers
    “Bridge of Spies” Steven Spielberg, Marc Platt and Kristie Macosko Krieger, Producers
    “Brooklyn” Finola Dwyer and Amanda Posey, Producers
    “Mad Max: Fury Road” Doug Mitchell and George Miller, Producers
    “The Martian” Simon Kinberg, Ridley Scott, Michael Schaefer and Mark Huffam, Producers
    “The Revenant” Arnon Milchan, Steve Golin, Alejandro G. Iñárritu, Mary Parent and Keith Redmon, Producers
    “Room” Ed Guiney, Producer
    “Spotlight” Michael Sugar, Steve Golin, Nicole Rocklin and Blye Pagon Faust, Producers

    Achievement in production design
    “Bridge of Spies” Production Design: Adam Stockhausen; Set Decoration: Rena DeAngelo and Bernhard Henrich
    “The Danish Girl” Production Design: Eve Stewart; Set Decoration: Michael Standish
    “Mad Max: Fury Road” Production Design: Colin Gibson; Set Decoration: Lisa Thompson
    “The Martian” Production Design: Arthur Max; Set Decoration: Celia Bobak
    “The Revenant” Production Design: Jack Fisk; Set Decoration: Hamish Purdy

    Best animated short film

    “Bear Story” Gabriel Osorio and Pato Escala
    “Prologue” Richard Williams and Imogen Sutton
    “Sanjay’s Super Team” Sanjay Patel and Nicole Grindle
    “We Can’t Live without Cosmos” Konstantin Bronzit
    “World of Tomorrow” Don Hertzfeldt

    Best live action short film
    “Ave Maria” Basil Khalil and Eric Dupont
    “Day One” Henry Hughes
    “Everything Will Be Okay (Alles Wird Gut)” Patrick Vollrath
    “Shok” Jamie Donoughue
    “Stutterer” Benjamin Cleary and Serena Armitage

    Achievement in sound editing
    “Mad Max: Fury Road” Mark Mangini and David White
    “The Martian” Oliver Tarney
    “The Revenant” Martin Hernandez and Lon Bender
    “Sicario” Alan Robert Murray
    “Star Wars: The Force Awakens” Matthew Wood and David Acord

    Achievement in sound mixing

    “Bridge of Spies” Andy Nelson, Gary Rydstrom and Drew Kunin
    “Mad Max: Fury Road” Chris Jenkins, Gregg Rudloff and Ben Osmo
    “The Martian” Paul Massey, Mark Taylor and Mac Ruth
    “The Revenant” Jon Taylor, Frank A. Montaño, Randy Thom and Chris Duesterdiek
    “Star Wars: The Force Awakens” Andy Nelson, Christopher Scarabosio and Stuart Wilson

    Achievement in visual effects
    “Ex Machina” Andrew Whitehurst, Paul Norris, Mark Ardington and Sara Bennett
    “Mad Max: Fury Road” Andrew Jackson, Tom Wood, Dan Oliver and Andy Williams
    “The Martian” Richard Stammers, Anders Langlands, Chris Lawrence and Steven Warner
    “The Revenant” Rich McBride, Matthew Shumway, Jason Smith and Cameron Waldbauer
    “Star Wars: The Force Awakens” Roger Guyett, Patrick Tubach, Neal Scanlan and Chris Corbould

    Adapted screenplay
    “The Big Short” Screenplay by Charles Randolph and Adam McKay
    “Brooklyn” Screenplay by Nick Hornby
    “Carol” Screenplay by Phyllis Nagy
    “The Martian” Screenplay by Drew Goddard
    “Room” Screenplay by Emma Donoghue

    Original screenplay
    “Bridge of Spies” Written by Matt Charman and Ethan Coen & Joel Coen
    “Ex Machina” Written by Alex Garland
    “Inside Out” Screenplay by Pete Docter, Meg LeFauve, Josh Cooley; Original story by Pete Docter, Ronnie del Carmen
    “Spotlight” Written by Josh Singer & Tom McCarthy
    “Straight Outta Compton” Screenplay by Jonathan Herman and Andrea Berloff; Story by S. Leigh Savidge & Alan Wenkus and Andrea Berloff
    "Even if you dance for your enemy on the rock, he will accuse you of splashing water on him." ~ African Proverb




  2. #2
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    Re: 2016 Academy Awards

    No Ridley Scott for director.

    No love for Carol in Picture and Director.

    Love for Room in Picture and Director.

    12 for The Revenant
    10 for Mad Max

  3. #3

    Re: 2016 Academy Awards

    Most award season films this year were rather ho-hum and so too are the Oscar noms.
    I've seen 2 BP noms - 'The Big Short' & 'Brooklyn'.
    Too bad 'Carol' didn't do better.
    I'd love to see Saoirse Ronan win.
    Chris Rock is presenting this year...yikes!

  4. #4
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    Re: 2016 Academy Awards

    Excellent..he's hosting too

  5. #5

    Re: 2016 Academy Awards

    Quote Originally Posted by shtexas View Post
    No Ridley Scott for director.

    No love for Carol in Picture and Director.

    Love for Room in Picture and Director.

    12 for The Revenant
    10 for Mad Max
    For me, the biggest shockers are no nominations for Ridley Scott (many Oscar prediction sites I've seen had him winning) and Idris Elba.
    Old News= Madison Brengle. New News- It's All About Amanda Fink Chichi Scholl, FULL CIRCLE OF LIFE MADISON BRENGLE BABY!!!!!!!!

  6. #6

    Re: 2016 Academy Awards

    Black Actors Shut Out of Oscar Race — Again
    January 14, 2016 | 07:16AM PT
    Awards Editor
    Tim Gray
    Awards Editor @timgray_variety



    Last year’s Oscar nominations drew howls of protests for their lack of diversity. This year, the picture didn’t get any better, particularly for African-Americans.

    Black actors, writers, directors and producers were shut out in the top categories once again. Even the Best Original Screenplay nod for the N.W.A biopic “Straight Outta Compton” went to a self-described “white Jewish gay guy from Connecticut” and his white writing partner, Jonathan Herman and Andrea Berloff.

    Some may conclude that the nominations reflect institutional bias against minorities and women within the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences, but the problem is with Hollywood’s major studios and agencies. There were 305 films eligible this year. If hiring reflected the U.S. population, Oscar voters would have weighed 150-plus films directed by women, 45 directed by blacks, 50 by Hispanics, and dozens of movies by directors who are Asian-American, LGBT or members of other minorities. Of course, the actual tallies were a fraction of those numbers. Surprising omissions from the actor race this year included Idris Elba for “Beasts of No Nation” and Will Smith for “Concussion.”

    Last year, #OscarSoWhite lit up the Twitter-sphere, generally focused on the acting and directing categories, mostly due to omission of actor David Oyelowo and director Ava DuVernay from “Selma.” But in fact, the imbalance carries into the majority of categories due to lack of opportunity.

    In the Jan. 14 announcement, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences listed 23 total producers for the eight movies picked in the best-pic race; seven were women. For the two screenplay races, 17 individuals are nominated, with four women and no racial minorities.

    Several Oscar categories traditionally offer a mix of gender, race and sexual orientations among nominees, including documentaries, shorts, feature-animation, costume design, hair/makeup and editing. That’s true this year too. But in many of the artisan races, it’s an almost all-male list (e.g., cinematography, visual effects, production design, sound editing, sound mixing). One breakthrough this year: Sara Bennett joined two colleagues in the visual effects category, grabbing a nom for “Ex Machina.” That makes one woman of the 19 total nominees (for five films) in that category.

    The guilds don’t keep records on the racial breakdown of their membership. But most have training programs designed to help foster more career advancement opportunities for minorities and women. But so far, hiring in Hollywood is still overwhelmingly dominated by white men.

    For optimists, change is in motion. At the Governors Awards in November, AMPAS president Cheryl Boone Isaacs, who is African-American, announced the formation of A2020, a five-year plan in which the Academy and the studios will work on programs to ensure that top executives expand their thinking when hiring, mentoring and encouraging new talent.

    For pessimists, a five-year plan is too slow. But the harsh reality is that the film industry works at a glacial pace, locking in stars, writers and directors several years in advance. So even though studios and agencies may say they want immediate change, it’s a question-mark how realistic that is; an overhaul was not evident in this year’s nominations, and it may not be apparent next year either.

    Awareness of the problem isn’t new in the film industry; various solutions have been proposed, only to fade away.

    In 1956, Variety ran a series of articles asking why there aren’t better roles for black actors. Three decades later, the situation hadn’t improved. On Feb. 19, 1982, Variety carried the front-page banner “NAACP faults film employment.” At a press conference, the group released a “white list,” naming 43 films “in which the organization says blacks have been excluded from significant roles in front of and behind the cameras.” The story added that every major studio was represented on the list of movies.

    Similarly, on Feb. 12, 1991, Variety ran a front-page story about the findings of the DGA Women’s Steering Committee: Of 207 feature-film assignments, 11 went to women. That’s 5.3%. Nearly 25 years later, the number had barely moved: Women comprised 9% of directors on the top 250 domestic grossing films and 12% of directors on the top 500 domestic grossing films, according to a new report by the Center for the Study of Women in Television and Film at San Diego State University.

    The few 2015 Hollywood films from women directors included “Fifty Shades of Grey,” “The Intern,” “Suffragette,” “The 33,” “By the Sea” and “Perfect Pitch 2.” Films directed by blacks, Asian-Americans and Hispanics included “Straight Outta Compton,” “Creed,” “Beasts of No Nation,” “The Revenant” and “Chi-raq.” They got some Oscar attention, but the diversity factor overall is still low.

    The Academy in June invited a record 322 new members, with many reflecting the Academy’s push for greater diversity among its membership. But the current membership — overwhelmingly Caucasian and over-50 — won’t see a fast overhaul soon, due to membership rules. The Academy is an honor society, in which industry experience is the primary consideration to join. Hollywood history has been filled with those demographics, and AMPAS is not about to kick out its current members.

    The film industry is about two decades behind television. The boom in cable channels means more risks and more diversity, in terms of gender, race and sexual orientation. This year’s Emmy Awards marked a milestone as Viola Davis became the first African-American to win for lead actress in a drama for ABC’s “How to Get Away with Murder.” The success of shows that run the gamut of “Scandal” and “Empire to “Key & Peele,” “Black-ish,” “Orange is the New Black” and “Transparent”offer a reminder that diversity is good for the business the showbiz, in front of and behind the camera.

    (Pictured: “Beasts of No Nation”)

    http://variety.com/2016/biz/news/osc...te-1201674903/
    "Even if you dance for your enemy on the rock, he will accuse you of splashing water on him." ~ African Proverb




  7. #7
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    Re: 2016 Academy Awards

    They just love Jennifer Lawrence. I like her a lot too, but there were several moments in Joy where she wasn't believable (although a strong performance overall) and she's a really fake-looking cryer.

    I haven't seen 45 Years, but I'm so glad to see Charlotte Rampling recognized, she's tremendous.

    I haven't seen Beasts of No Nation. Were there other contenders of color besides Elba and Michael B Jordan that were shut out?


  8. #8

    Re: 2016 Academy Awards

    Quote Originally Posted by mmmm8 View Post
    They just love Jennifer Lawrence. I like her a lot too, but there were several moments in Joy where she wasn't believable (although a strong performance overall) and she's a really fake-looking cryer.
    4 acting noms by age 25 is a record. And I presume she is one of the youngest Best Actress winners ever.

  9. #9

    Re: 2016 Academy Awards

    I've seen Jennifer Lawrence in "Winter's Bone" and "Silver Lining". The first movie was her best IMO. I found her dull and one dimensional in "Silver Lining". But that's just me.
    "Even if you dance for your enemy on the rock, he will accuse you of splashing water on him." ~ African Proverb




  10. #10

    Re: 2016 Academy Awards

    I don't see any way Leo DiCaprio doesn't win Best Actor.

    This is actually a really respectable group of Best Picture nominees. I actually really like all of these (still haven't seen The Big Short, but it looks right up my alley). Still wish Inside Out was there, though.
    Last edited by munchin; 01-14-2016 at 07:58 AM.
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  11. #11
    Everyday Warrior MJ2004's Avatar
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    Re: 2016 Academy Awards

    Silver Linings Playbook: I preferred Bradley Cooper's performance, which was underrated, I thought.

    I don't get the hype about Jennifer Lawrence.

    Also, I thought Amy Adams got unfairly overshadowed in the coverage of American Hustle. Same thing.
    Last edited by MJ2004; 01-14-2016 at 08:16 AM.

  12. #12

    Re: 2016 Academy Awards

    Oscar Nominations 2016: The 10 Biggest Snubs and Surprises

    From the depth of love for Mad Max and Room to the utterly surprising 100 Year Old Man, here‘s everything that raised our eyebrows this morning.
    by

    Katey Rich

    Now that the rush of the morning’s Oscar nominations announcement is behind us, we can take the time to breathe and figure out what we just saw. Did Cate Blanchett really get nominated in best actress while her co-star Rooney Mara got shoved to supporting? Did we really not hear Aaron Sorkin’s name? Who left out Wiz Khalifa? Below we’ve run down the biggest snubs, surprises, and genuine shockers of the 2016 Oscar nominations.

    Not enough for Carol. Lush, romantic, impeccably designed, full of big ideas—what more could Academy voters possibly want than Carol? And with six nominations it’s one of the more popular films of the morning . . . so what on Earth kept it out of the picture and director categories? Director Todd Haynes was also left out of the D.G.A. nominations so we can’t try to be too surprised, but the exclusion stings for such a beautiful movie, and such a nice contrast to the male-driven efforts (The Big Short, The Revenant, The Martian, Spotlight) that make up the majority of the category.

    They love Star Wars, but not quite enough. It wasn’t just the expected technical categories where Star Wars: The Force Awakens shone through—the film-editing nomination is a huge one, often a category reserved for best-picture nominees, and the best-original-score nomination for John Williams is proof of just how iconic the franchise remains. I’d held out hope that this wave of affection might propel the movie to a best-picture nomination . . . but I was just about the only one, and was clearly hoping just a bit in vain. There’s always Episode VIII!

    But they really love Mad Max: Fury Road. The Revenant was the overall leader of the morning with 12 nominations, but as an intense period drama from the director of last year’s best-picture winner, that can’t really be considered a surprise. But a wild and wooly action movie based on a long-dormant franchise and including things as insane as Immortan Joe? Now that’s pretty amazing. Mad Max has been winning critic’s awards long enough that the novelty of it might have worn off, but take this moment to realize that a really, genuinely weird movie is a best-picture nominee, proving that there are surprises left in this world after all.

    And they really love Room! Despite a lot of initial excitement, ours included, there was a sense that the momentum for Room was fading. How glad we are that we were wrong, and the film not only scored a best-picture nomination—joining Brooklyn and Mad Max: Fury Road as part of a kind of female-led armada—but a very surprising best-director nomination for Lenny Abrahamson. Add in Brie Larson for best actress and Emma Donoghue for best adapted screenplay and you’ve got a powerful representation of the littlest movie in the bunch.

    Category fraud wins again. We shouldn’t count this as a surprise, really, since category fraud has been rampant for decades (Anthony Hopkins won best actor for being in Silence of the Lambs for 16 minutes!). But Rooney Mara and Alicia Vikander both were successfully nominated for best supporting actress, at the behest of their studios, even though their roles in Carol and The Danish Girl were certainly leads. It’s wonderful to see both performances rewarded, but also a little harrowing to think of the category fraud it might inspire in the future.

    Aaron Sorkin and Quentin Tarantino left out. They have three screenwriting Oscars between them, and are among the most famous screenwriters alive. Yet even though their films—Steve Jobs and The Hateful Eight, respectively—were nominated for their actors, the screenplays were left out, with newer names like Phyllis Nagy, Emma Donoghue, and the team behind Straight Outta Compton jumping in instead. Neither The Hateful Eight nor Steve Jobs were the most popular films of awards season, but their screenplays were among the most celebrated elements, which made it a surprise to see both Sorkin and Tarantino left out this morning.

    Rachel McAdams gets her due. After years of being the best thing in movies that were beneath her and causing critics to wonder when she’d finally get her proper recognition, McAdams has earned a best-supporting-actress nomination for her work in Spotlight. It’s not the showiest role of her career, but that’s the beauty of Spotlight, showing what a true ensemble can do when working in sync together toward something larger. Hopefully this allows us to forget thankless roles in Southpaw and Aloha—between those and True Detective, what a wild 2015 she had!—and move on to a much brighter future.

    What’s up with that lone screenplay nod for Straight Outta Compton? When it earned a surprising SAG nomination for best ensemble we knew the hip-hop historical drama was popular, and we had even predicted it to round out the best-picture lineup. Instead it scored a somewhat out of nowhere nod for best original screenplay—a terrific honor for the writers, but an odd way to acknowledge a popular film that, ahem, could have helped shield the Academy from another year of #OscarsSoWhite. It feels oddly similar to what happened when Selma was nominated for best picture and best original song . . . and nothing else. Not a great trend to continue.

    We won’t see you again, “See You Again.” The best-original-song category is so historically wackadoo—“Alone Yet Not Alone,” never forget—that it’s hard to call anything there a snub, but the ever-present hit single “See You Again” from Furious 7 really seemed like a sure thing. You have to be a little sad not to live in a world that includes “Oscar nominee Wiz Khalifa.”

    What on Earth is The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared? Actually, smarter people than us—most notably Joe Reid—had already predicted that this would be the guaranteed “Huh?” nomination of the bunch, because the makeup category always goes for old-age looks, and after all, the movie had already made the Academy short list. It’s streaming on Amazon Prime right now, so if it’s your goal to see all of the year’s nominees, you can go ahead and get started!

    http://www.vanityfair.com/hollywood/...social_twitter
    "Even if you dance for your enemy on the rock, he will accuse you of splashing water on him." ~ African Proverb




  13. #13

    Re: 2016 Academy Awards

    Jennifer Lawrence!


    Glad Inside Out got a nom. Was semi-scared that it would get snubbed like The Lego Movie did last year.

  14. #14
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    Re: 2016 Academy Awards

    If Stallone wins supporting actor I'll stab myself in the eyes.
    Oh Grigor. You silly man.

  15. #15

    Re: 2016 Academy Awards

    Quote Originally Posted by Ti-Amie View Post
    Black Actors Shut Out of Oscar Race — Again
    January 14, 2016 | 07:16AM PT
    Awards Editor
    Tim Gray
    Awards Editor @timgray_variety



    Last year’s Oscar nominations drew howls of protests for their lack of diversity. This year, the picture didn’t get any better, particularly for African-Americans.

    Black actors, writers, directors and producers were shut out in the top categories once again. Even the Best Original Screenplay nod for the N.W.A biopic “Straight Outta Compton” went to a self-described “white Jewish gay guy from Connecticut” and his white writing partner, Jonathan Herman and Andrea Berloff.

    Some may conclude that the nominations reflect institutional bias against minorities and women within the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences, but the problem is with Hollywood’s major studios and agencies. There were 305 films eligible this year. If hiring reflected the U.S. population, Oscar voters would have weighed 150-plus films directed by women, 45 directed by blacks, 50 by Hispanics, and dozens of movies by directors who are Asian-American, LGBT or members of other minorities. Of course, the actual tallies were a fraction of those numbers. Surprising omissions from the actor race this year included Idris Elba for “Beasts of No Nation” and Will Smith for “Concussion.”

    Last year, #OscarSoWhite lit up the Twitter-sphere, generally focused on the acting and directing categories, mostly due to omission of actor David Oyelowo and director Ava DuVernay from “Selma.” But in fact, the imbalance carries into the majority of categories due to lack of opportunity.

    In the Jan. 14 announcement, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences listed 23 total producers for the eight movies picked in the best-pic race; seven were women. For the two screenplay races, 17 individuals are nominated, with four women and no racial minorities.

    Several Oscar categories traditionally offer a mix of gender, race and sexual orientations among nominees, including documentaries, shorts, feature-animation, costume design, hair/makeup and editing. That’s true this year too. But in many of the artisan races, it’s an almost all-male list (e.g., cinematography, visual effects, production design, sound editing, sound mixing). One breakthrough this year: Sara Bennett joined two colleagues in the visual effects category, grabbing a nom for “Ex Machina.” That makes one woman of the 19 total nominees (for five films) in that category.

    The guilds don’t keep records on the racial breakdown of their membership. But most have training programs designed to help foster more career advancement opportunities for minorities and women. But so far, hiring in Hollywood is still overwhelmingly dominated by white men.

    For optimists, change is in motion. At the Governors Awards in November, AMPAS president Cheryl Boone Isaacs, who is African-American, announced the formation of A2020, a five-year plan in which the Academy and the studios will work on programs to ensure that top executives expand their thinking when hiring, mentoring and encouraging new talent.

    For pessimists, a five-year plan is too slow. But the harsh reality is that the film industry works at a glacial pace, locking in stars, writers and directors several years in advance. So even though studios and agencies may say they want immediate change, it’s a question-mark how realistic that is; an overhaul was not evident in this year’s nominations, and it may not be apparent next year either.

    Awareness of the problem isn’t new in the film industry; various solutions have been proposed, only to fade away.

    In 1956, Variety ran a series of articles asking why there aren’t better roles for black actors. Three decades later, the situation hadn’t improved. On Feb. 19, 1982, Variety carried the front-page banner “NAACP faults film employment.” At a press conference, the group released a “white list,” naming 43 films “in which the organization says blacks have been excluded from significant roles in front of and behind the cameras.” The story added that every major studio was represented on the list of movies.

    Similarly, on Feb. 12, 1991, Variety ran a front-page story about the findings of the DGA Women’s Steering Committee: Of 207 feature-film assignments, 11 went to women. That’s 5.3%. Nearly 25 years later, the number had barely moved: Women comprised 9% of directors on the top 250 domestic grossing films and 12% of directors on the top 500 domestic grossing films, according to a new report by the Center for the Study of Women in Television and Film at San Diego State University.

    The few 2015 Hollywood films from women directors included “Fifty Shades of Grey,” “The Intern,” “Suffragette,” “The 33,” “By the Sea” and “Perfect Pitch 2.” Films directed by blacks, Asian-Americans and Hispanics included “Straight Outta Compton,” “Creed,” “Beasts of No Nation,” “The Revenant” and “Chi-raq.” They got some Oscar attention, but the diversity factor overall is still low.

    The Academy in June invited a record 322 new members, with many reflecting the Academy’s push for greater diversity among its membership. But the current membership — overwhelmingly Caucasian and over-50 — won’t see a fast overhaul soon, due to membership rules. The Academy is an honor society, in which industry experience is the primary consideration to join. Hollywood history has been filled with those demographics, and AMPAS is not about to kick out its current members.

    The film industry is about two decades behind television. The boom in cable channels means more risks and more diversity, in terms of gender, race and sexual orientation. This year’s Emmy Awards marked a milestone as Viola Davis became the first African-American to win for lead actress in a drama for ABC’s “How to Get Away with Murder.” The success of shows that run the gamut of “Scandal” and “Empire to “Key & Peele,” “Black-ish,” “Orange is the New Black” and “Transparent”offer a reminder that diversity is good for the business the showbiz, in front of and behind the camera.

    (Pictured: “Beasts of No Nation”)

    http://variety.com/2016/biz/news/osc...te-1201674903/
    Understatement From Captain Obvious Alert: THIS especially (and all of the far too many inequities) has to get addressed and solved, once and for all.
    Last edited by nelslus; 01-14-2016 at 11:42 AM.
    Old News= Madison Brengle. New News- It's All About Amanda Fink Chichi Scholl, FULL CIRCLE OF LIFE MADISON BRENGLE BABY!!!!!!!!

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