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  1. #136

    Re: Let's Discuss Nutrition/Global Food Issues

    I buy air chilled chicken as well.

    I just bought a boneless raised without antibiotics non GMO boneless pork shoulder roast that cost over $40 at $6.99 per pound. That is the estimated cost.

    I thank the powers that be that I'm able to.
    There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life.”

    ― Frank Zappa





  2. #137

    Re: Let's Discuss Nutrition/Global Food Issues

    Not sure comparing cancer rates is the best way to judge. People live long these days, got to die from something...

    On a similar topic we currently driving in North India. Lots of dusty towns and small shops. Most sell hardly anything other than junk food (chips and soft drinks). A bit bigger ones have vegetables/fruits at least...
    Roger forever

  3. #138

    Re: Let's Discuss Nutrition/Global Food Issues

    Some of those back roads in Northern India can have pretty scary traffic.....even when the traffic is not heavy there is some pretty crazy driving going on. Do be careful!!!! (however, I had a great time there, and I'm sure you will, too). GH

  4. #139
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    Re: Let's Discuss Nutrition/Global Food Issues

    Quote Originally Posted by suliso View Post
    Not sure comparing cancer rates is the best way to judge. People live long these days, got to die from something...
    I'm sure there's all kind of informed arguments that can be made for and against this point. There is this though:

    https://www.webmd.com/colorectal-can...king-the-young

  5. #140

    Re: Let's Discuss Nutrition/Global Food Issues

    Only thing I could add would be: #Monsanto, #Bayer, #BASF.
    Which by now I don't know who owns what or whom else, but these monster companies...
    Too early to start one of my rants.

    @Suliso. If you do not use cancer rates, what would you use? You can compare cancer rates by age, sex and other variables. So if you have a clear difference between cancer rates in age groups that are less affected "traditionally" by cancer, you can see some patterns.
    Also. What control group would you use? In what country in the world by now there are completely and truly organic products? I am sure you could find some countries where no pesticides are used, like Laos or Buthan, but then the life expectancy will be lower due to other reasons.
    I suggest we go back to hunting/gathering
    Last edited by ponchi101; 06-06-2019 at 07:21 AM.
    Missing winter...

  6. #141
    Everyday Warrior MJ2004's Avatar
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    Let's Discuss Nutrition/Global Food Issues

    Speaking of Bayer, this was in today’s FT. Remember that Roundup is still legal in the United States.

    Here is a list of where glyphosate is banned:
    https://www.baumhedlundlaw.com/toxic...hosate-banned/


    Bayer’s weedkiller woes offer a scientific cautionary tale

    The company’s case illustrates the danger of monopolising a market
    ANJANA AHUJA - FT

    It was the dream package: sell farmers a highly effective weed killer together with crop seeds genetically modified to tolerate it. That, at least partly, is how a herbicide called glyphosate, first sold in the 1970s by Monsanto under the brand name Roundup, turned into a global market worth up to $6bn.

    That dream turned into a nightmare for Bayer, which acquired Monsanto for $63bn last year — and inherited its legal liabilities. Last month, a court in California ordered the German group to pay $2bn to a couple who claimed their cancers were caused by using Roundup. It was the third such defeat for Bayer. The company insists its herbicide is safe and will appeal. More than 13,000 similar claims have been lodged.

    The company’s weedkiller woes offer two cautionary tales. The first is the high reputational and financial cost of trying to distort the scientific record. Monsanto’s perceived attempts to game the literature prompted the jury to award punitive damages. Questionable practices allegedly included “ghostwriting” papers: persuading outside academics to put their names to internally written, more flattering research, then publishing in scientific journals.

    The second cautionary tale illustrates the danger of monopoly: as cheap, versatile glyphosate cornered the market, research on other herbicides withered. Weeds, faced with the same foe year after year, evolved resistance.

    A 2018 paper in the journal Pest Management Science counts at least 38 glyphosate-resistant species. With herbicide research stagnant, its authors warn, “weed control in major crops is at a precarious point”.

    Had Bayer not already lost two cases, the company might have felt hopeful. In April, the US Environmental Protection Agency stated, pending a review, that the herbicide posed no risks to public health. It was just as well for the most widely used weed killer in the US: the broad-spectrum herbicide, which disrupts a plant enzyme crucial for growth, is deployed on food crops such as glyphosate-resistant corn and soyabeans, as well as in parks and forests. The EPA’s verdict was based on, among other evidence, Monsanto’s own confidential studies. On similar evidence but amid growing concern from member states, the EU voted narrowly in 2017 to permit glyphosate products until 2022.

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), an arm of the World Health Organization, thought differently. In 2015, after scrutinising around 1,000 publicly available studies, the agency decided the herbicide was “probably carcinogenic to humans” for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), a cancer of the immune system.

    The decision was based on studies of glyphosate exposure, mostly among agricultural workers, and “convincing evidence that glyphosate also can cause cancers in mice”. Glyphosate joined the same carcinogen category as very hot drinks and red meat.

    This tougher line, which triggered the lawsuits, is supported by a recent meta-analysis. The study, published in February by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, and the University of Washington, suggested that those with the highest cumulative exposures to glyphosate increased their risk of developing NHL by 41 per cent. Other factors, such as age and certain infections, also magnify risk; this makes causation a vigorously contested issue.

    Meanwhile, the journal Science reports, some researchers fear losing a familiar herbicide that minimises the need for tilling and so lessens soil erosion. Alternatives have their downsides. Atrazine, banned in the EU, can contaminate groundwater; dicamba can drift and harm other crops.

    Bioherbicides, derived from living organisms such as soil bacteria, look promising but require more research. Whatever plays out in the courtroom, the war on weeds must begin anew.

  7. #142

    Re: Let's Discuss Nutrition/Global Food Issues

    Bayer managers were complete morons in buying Monsanto. No other action could have destroyed their reputation as thoroughly. Before they were mostly known for pharma.
    Roger forever

  8. #143
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    Re: Let's Discuss Nutrition/Global Food Issues

    I just found out a few hours that my company did a big media push on the findings of a new intramural study conducted by researchers at one of our clients--the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). It got international pick up, and our media monitoring software told us the story reached approximately 1.8 billion people globally.

    When you start to read the articles about it, you immediately say, "Duh, we knew this already." But this was a study with a twist. Of course, please note the small sample size (n=20).


    Ultra-processed foods lead to higher calorie consumption and weight gain

  9. #144
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    Re: Let's Discuss Nutrition/Global Food Issues

    Quote Originally Posted by suliso View Post
    Not sure comparing cancer rates is the best way to judge. People live long these days, got to die from something...

    On a similar topic we currently driving in North India. Lots of dusty towns and small shops. Most sell hardly anything other than junk food (chips and soft drinks). A bit bigger ones have vegetables/fruits at least...

    Diabetes is the fastest-growing medical condition in India.


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