Agree Agree:  64
Likes Likes:  73
Page 36 of 39 FirstFirst ... 11263233343536373839 LastLast
Results 526 to 540 of 571
  1. #526

    Re: Techno-babble Random Random

    Eric Geller‏Verified account @ericgeller 46s47 seconds ago
    More
    Bipartisan group of 36 senators ask DOJ, SEC, and FTC to investigate Equifax execs' post-data-breach stock sales.

    "For the person that we know in the daytime, we don't need to light a lamp to see his face at night." Ghanaian Proverb


  2. #527
    Head Cheese
    Awards Showcase

    Kirkus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    California, USA
    Posts
    37,427
    Blog Entries
    10

    Re: Techno-babble Random Random

    Quote Originally Posted by Ti-Amie View Post
    Eric Geller‏Verified account @ericgeller 46s47 seconds ago
    More
    Bipartisan group of 36 senators ask DOJ, SEC, and FTC to investigate Equifax execs' post-data-breach stock sales.

    Well, that's nice.

    I'm tellin' ya, technology is outpacing its ability to be secured. I've been saying that for years. And it's unfortunate that individuals really have no say in where their personal information is stored.
    Oh Grigor. You silly man.

  3. #528

    Re: Techno-babble Random Random

    That is the reason I never even put my name in any site. Even for our TAT FF league I left my name out.
    I read a great article about the fact that a lot of the data cannot be changed (like a password) because it is YOUR DATA: birth date, name, address (what are you going to do, move?), SSN, etc. It is getting to a point that having your money in a pit in your backyard is getting to be a good option.

    The guys from Equifax should go to prison. If that is not trading based on insider information, I don't know what is.
    Last edited by ponchi101; 09-12-2017 at 09:20 PM.
    Starry starry night

  4. #529

    Re: Techno-babble Random Random

    Eric Geller‏Verified account @ericgeller 31s31 seconds ago
    More
    BREAKING: DHS directs federal agencies to identify any use of Kaspersky software and prepare to stop using it.

    "For the person that we know in the daytime, we don't need to light a lamp to see his face at night." Ghanaian Proverb


  5. #530
    Head Cheese
    Awards Showcase

    Kirkus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    California, USA
    Posts
    37,427
    Blog Entries
    10

    Re: Techno-babble Random Random

    Quote Originally Posted by ponchi101 View Post
    That is the reason I never even put my name in any site. Even for our TAT FF league I left my name out.
    I read a great article about the fact that a lot of the data cannot be changed (like a password) because it is YOUR DATA: birth date, name, address (what are you going to do, move?), SSN, etc. It is getting to a point that having your money in a pit in your backyard is getting to be a good option.

    The guys from Equifax should go to prison. If that is not trading based on insider information, I don't know what is.
    With all the satellite technology I'm not convinced keeping your money in a backyard pit would be secure.
    Oh Grigor. You silly man.

  6. #531

    Re: Techno-babble Random Random

    Tripp Mickle‏Verified account @trippmickle 38s38 seconds ago
    Face ID has its New Yorker moment

    "For the person that we know in the daytime, we don't need to light a lamp to see his face at night." Ghanaian Proverb


  7. #532

    Re: Techno-babble Random Random

    Facebook to turn over thousands of Russian ads to Congress, reversing decision
    By Carol D. Leonnig and Craig Timberg September 21 at 3:31 PM

    Facebook has decided to turn over to Congress copies of more than 3,000 online political advertisements bought through Russian accounts during the 2016 U.S. presidential campaign, reversing a decision that had frustrated Capitol Hill investigators, company officials said Thursday.

    The company had previously shown some of the ads to investigators but taken back copies before they could be studied carefully, citing concerns over user privacy at the time. Facebook has reversed that position amid rising complaints from Capitol Hill that the company was not cooperating fully with its investigation.

    Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg was scheduled to announce the decision on Facebook Live Tuesday afternoon, citing what the company called “an extensive legal and policy review.” The company concluded that it was “vitally important” to cooperate fully with Congress and that the company could do so in a way that didn’t endanger user privacy, according to a blog post by Facebook General Counsel Colin Stretch.

    “We believe the public deserves a full accounting of what happened in the 2016 election, and we’ve concluded that sharing the ads we’ve discovered, in a manner that is consistent with our obligations to protect user information, can help,” Stretch said.

    The blog post also said that “all relevant companies and industries” need to provide access to crucial information and documents.

    “We want to do our part,” said Stretch in his blog post.

    The Facebook ads were bought, through fake accounts, by the Internet Research Agency, a shadowy troll farm based in St. Petersburg, Russia.

    Congressional investigators had also complained that they wanted more cooperation from Google and Twitter, both of which carried what independent investigators have concluded was substantial amounts of poltical propaganda on their platforms, some of it emanating from Russia.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/busin...e&deferJs=true
    "For the person that we know in the daytime, we don't need to light a lamp to see his face at night." Ghanaian Proverb


  8. #533

    Re: Techno-babble Random Random

    Trump Supporters Quietly Built A Massive List With The Personal Information Of Thousands Of People
    The list began traveling the dark corners of the internet around April as a scattered collection of names, addresses, phone numbers and social media accounts. It's now a massive organized database of thousands of people.

    Posted on September 21, 2017, at 1:15 p.m.
    Ryan Broderick
    BuzzFeed News Reporter

    On Thursday, a 4chan user linked to a massive pastebin document in a thread called "ANTIFA GETS DOXXED".

    https://img.buzzfeed.com/buzzfeed-st...t-quality=auto

    The pastebin file has been traveling around the internet since at least April. It started as a scattered collection of names, phone numbers, addresses, and social media accounts of about 3,000 people and now, months later, it's grown into a massive organized database of apparently thousands more.

    The sprawling document, which is still up, opens with text reading, "someone hacked Antifa, [sic] and got the entire list of people available for antifa activities."

    https://www.buzzfeed.com/ryanhatesth...az1#.tiY9rjEg8
    "For the person that we know in the daytime, we don't need to light a lamp to see his face at night." Ghanaian Proverb


  9. #534

    Re: Techno-babble Random Random

    Quote Originally Posted by Kirkus View Post
    With all the satellite technology I'm not convinced keeping your money in a backyard pit would be secure.
    And anyway, our dogs would dig it up some night, eat some of it and spread the rest of it thinly around the yard, maybe even passing some of it through the fence to their buddies, the dogs that live next door, so that they could eat and play with it, too.

    Not a great option for us. GH

  10. #535

    Re: Techno-babble Random Random

    Do you guys even feed your dogs? Because mine used to just sit down with me and drink beer.
    Starry starry night

  11. #536

    Re: Techno-babble Random Random

    Lawyer: Hacker in Spanish custody sought by US, Russia
    By ARITZ PARRA
    Today

    MADRID (AP) — Russian authorities are fighting the extradition of an alleged Russian hacker from Spain to the United States, the suspect’s lawyer said Friday, in the latest move by Moscow to block U.S. prosecution of suspected Russian cybercriminals.

    Pyotr Levashov, a 37-year-old known as one of the world’s most notorious hackers, was arrested earlier this year while vacationing with his family in Barcelona on a request from the U.S., where authorities want him on charges of fraud and unauthorized interception of electronic communications.

    Levashov’s lawyer, Margarita Repina, told The Associated Press that a Russian counter-extradition request was filed with Spanish authorities Thursday, hours before a hearing in Madrid to decide whether he should be handed to U.S. authorities.

    The Russian Embassy in Madrid didn’t immediately respond to requests for comment.

    The hearing at Spain’s National Court on Friday was suspended after defense lawyers alleged his arrest on a U.S. request was politically motivated and argued he should be tried in Spain.

    Authorities in the U.S. have linked Levashov, via his alias “Peter Severa,” to a series of powerful botnets, or networks of hijacked computers capable of pumping out billions of spam emails.

    His arrest is part of a series of U.S.-initiated operations over the past year to seize the alleged Russian cybercriminals outside their homeland, which has no extradition treaty with the U.S.

    The operations come as politicians in Washington are grappling with the allegation that Kremlin hackers intervened in the U.S. election to help President Donald Trump.

    Dressed in black sneakers and jeans and speaking through a court translator, Levashov said he didn’t want to be sent to the U.S. because he feared for his life and didn’t want to be tortured during detention on U.S. soil.

    The court suspended the hearing until next week to allow time for the prosecutor to review new documents submitted by Levashov’s defense to back their allegations that the U.S. wants him for reasons beyond his alleged cybercrimes.

    The lawyers said that the documents are meant to show how Levashov gained access to Russian state secrets while studying in St. Petersburg, how he received military training to operate missiles.

    The conflicting extradition requests echo the recent cases of Evgeny Nikulin, a Russian hacker accused by American authorities of penetrating professional networking site LinkedIn, and of Alexander Vinnik, who is wanted in the U.S. on charges of running a multi-billion-dollar digital money laundering network.

    Nikulin, who was arrested at a Prague restaurant in October, is the subject of a tug-of-war between the FBI, which wants him to face trial in the U.S. over hacks linked to several massive data breaches, and the Russians, who are seeking him on a far less serious charge.

    On Tuesday, Vinnik’s lawyer, Xanthippe Moyssidou, said the Russian, who was arrested in Greece in July over American allegations that he ran Bitcoin exchange BTC-e as a cash machine for cybercriminals, was also being sought by Moscow.

    Vinnik is fighting extradition to the United States, but Moyssidou said her client was willing to return to Russia.

    https://apnews.com/b39cd27d13f44e1b802bafa4114eb928
    "For the person that we know in the daytime, we don't need to light a lamp to see his face at night." Ghanaian Proverb


  12. #537

    Re: Techno-babble Random Random

    DOJ demands Facebook information from 'anti-administration activists'
    By Jessica Schneider, CNN
    Updated 1:20 PM EDT, Fri September 29, 2017

    (CNN) Trump administration lawyers are demanding the private account information of potentially thousands of Facebook users in three separate search warrants served on the social media giant, according to court documents obtained by CNN.

    The warrants specifically target the accounts of three Facebook users who are described by their attorneys as "anti-administration activists who have spoken out at organized events, and who are generally very critical of this administration's policies."

    One of those users, Emmelia Talarico, operated the disruptj20 page where Inauguration Day protests were organized and discussed; the page was visited by an estimated 6,000 users whose identities the government would have access to if Facebook hands over the information sought in the search warrants. In court filings, Talarico says if her account information was given to the government, officials would have access to her "personal passwords, security questions and answers, and credit card information," plus "the private lists of invitees and attendees to multiple political events sponsored by the page."

    These warrants were first reported by LawNewz.com.

    Facebook has not responded to a request for comment about whether it has, or plans to, comply with the search warrants.

    The American Civil Liberties Union, representing the three Facebook users, filed a motion to quash the warrants Thursday.

    "What is particularly chilling about these warrants is that anti-administration political activists are going to have their political associations and views scrutinized by the very administration they are protesting," said ACLU attorney Scott Michelman.

    Facebook was initially served the warrants in February 2017 along with a gag order which barred the social media company from alerting the three users that the government was seeking their private information, Michelman said. However, Michelman says that government attorneys dropped the gag order in mid-September and agreed that Facebook could expose the existence of these warrants, which has prompted the latest court filings. Michelman, however, says all court filings associated with the search warrant, and any response from Facebook, remain under seal.

    The Justice Department is not commenting on these search warrants, but government attorneys have issued a similar search warrant to the web provider DreamHost seeking wide-ranging information about visitors to the website disruptj20.org, which provided a forum for anti-Trump protestors. In that case, DOJ modified its initial search warrant seeking millions of IP address for the visitors who merely clicked on the disruptj20.org website. But DC Superior Court Judge Robert Morin largely granted prosecutors' request to collect a vast set of records from the company, which will include emails of the users who signed up for an account associated with the website, and membership lists.

    In addition to the account of Talarico and her disruptj20 page, the search warrant also seeks all information about the personal accounts of Lacy MacAuley and Legba Carrefour. Carrefour is a self-described political activist and pushed back against the search warrant in court filings, saying that his Facebook account "contains a significant amount of private material concerning my personal life." Carrefour denied that he was involved in any of the riots in Washington, DC, on Inauguration Day, but acknowledged that he has "participated in or helped to organize dozens of demonstrations and events of various types in service of political causes."

    https://amp.cnn.com/cnn/2017/09/28/p...sts/index.html
    "For the person that we know in the daytime, we don't need to light a lamp to see his face at night." Ghanaian Proverb


  13. #538
    Everyday Warrior MJ2004's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    2,801

    Re: Techno-babble Random Random

    The data flaw that can be deadly
    MADHUMITA MURGIA - FT

    Last week, I visited the Wellcome Trust’s Genome Campus, a verdant patch of land in Cambridgeshire, where otters and bats inhabit the woods surrounding the offices of geneticists and computer scientists. It is one of the world’s largest genomics hubs, where scientists are probing the secrets of human DNA.

    I met Sumit Jamuar, a former engineer who runs the start-up Global Gene Corp. The company, which has received funding from the Singapore government, wants to sequence anonymised genetic data from the South Asian population, starting with India, where Jamuar is originally from. He threw some eye-opening stats at me. More than 80 per cent of genomic data, which underpins much of how genetic medicine works comes from Caucasians. Of the remaining pie, about 14 per cent comes from Asian populations, while African and Hispanic populations together make up a measly 3.5 per cent.

    Why does this matter? It means gene-based diagnostic tests and drugs targeted at specific genetic mutations will be less effective – maybe even dangerous – for certain ethnic populations, because of the innate genetic differences in the DNA codes of different races.

    For instance, a recent study found that 650,000 African-Americans may have undiagnosed Type 2 diabetes because of a genetic quirk that fools a commonly used diabetic blood test. Other studies indicate that African-Americans have been consistently misdiagnosed with a certain type of heart disease, while Indians may be being mistakenly diagnosed and treated for epilepsy – all because their genomes haven’t been studied as deeply. “This data challenge isn’t just an inconvenience; it’s a matter of life and death,” Jamuar told me.

    Researchers at scientific journal Nature said findings from its own investigation on the diversity of these data sets “prompted warnings that a much broader range of populations should be investigated to avoid genomic medicine being of benefit merely to ‘a privileged few’”.

    This insidious data prejudice made me curious about other unintended biases in the tech world. Several new consumer technologies – often conceived by, built by and tested overwhelmingly on Caucasian males – are flawed due to biases in their design.

    In 2014, Danah Boyd, principal researcher at Microsoft Research, penned an article entitled “Is the Oculus Rift sexist?” She described how 3D virtual environments had made her and other female colleagues nauseous. A friend of hers then came across a footnote in an army research paper, which noted that women seemed to get sick at higher rates than men in virtual environments. In 2000, before the Rift was even invented, Boyd published the surprising results of a multi-year study into how male and female brains processed 3D visual stimuli differently. “In other words, men are more likely to use the cues that 3D virtual reality systems relied on,” she wrote.

    Last year, roboticist Carol Reiley, co-founder of the US self-driving car start-up Drive.ai, described how she was unable to get a voice-activated surgical robot that she had built using Microsoft speech recognition software to respond to her voice. The system, she wrote in a TechCrunch blog, “had been built mainly by 20-30-year-old men… I had to lower my pitch in order for it to work. As a result, I was not able to present my own work… a male graduate always had to lead the demonstration.”

    Instances of Google’s automated image-labelling system classing African-Americans as gorillas, and Microsoft and HP’s cameras being reportedly unable to track dark-skinned faces, also demonstrate this basic flaw; the systems just hadn’t been trained on enough examples of non-white faces. Imagine what this could mean if the camera system on a self-driving car failed to recognise a darker face on the road.

    As data-driven algorithms increasingly underpin the design of new products in medicine, transport and infrastructure, biased training data are not just awkward oddities, but deadly flaws.

  14. #539

    Re: Techno-babble Random Random

    Spain just extradited a Russian hacker to the US for possibly interfering in the US election
    Associated Press

    MOSCOW (AP) - Spain's National Court has decided to extradite a suspected Russian hacker to the United States.

    Pyotr Levashov, a 37-year-old known as one of the world's most notorious hackers, was arrested earlier this year while vacationing with his family in Barcelona. U.S. authorities had requested his arrest, for they want him on fraud charges and unauthorized interception of electronic communications.

    The Spanish court said Tuesday the U.S. extradition request has been approved. Russia in September filed a counter-extradition request for Levashov hours before the original extradition hearing.

    Authorities in the U.S. have linked Levashov to a series of powerful botnets, or networks of hijacked computers capable of pumping out billions of spam emails.

    Levashov's lawyers have alleged his arrest was politically motivated and argued that he should be tried in Spain.

    https://amp.businessinsider.com/ap-c...-to-us-2017-10
    "For the person that we know in the daytime, we don't need to light a lamp to see his face at night." Ghanaian Proverb


  15. #540

    Re: Techno-babble Random Random

    I always figured the universal translator would be a thing one day - I just didn't know it would happen so quickly.

    Google's New Earbuds Instantly Translate 40 Languages
    Google unveiled the Pixel Buds on Wednesday.

    By Kevin J. Ryan
    Staff writer, Inc.@wheresKR



    Your holiday wish list just got one item longer.

    Google held its annual hardware event Wednesday, at which it unveiled its newest Pixel and Google Home, among other products. But, it was an item revealed late in the presentation that might have been the most mind-blowing.

    Google's Pixel Buds are essentially the company's answer to Apple's AirPods. They're earbuds that connect to a smartphone--in this case, the Pixel--via Bluetooth. At $159, they're priced exactly the same as AirPods.

    But, because they pair with the Pixel smartphone, and thus Google's software, the headphones can do something Apple's headphones can't do: Translate spoken language in real time.

    The operation is performed using Google Translate, which is built into the Google Pixel. The wearer taps the right earbud and says something like, "Help me speak Spanish," and Google gets to work. A person standing nearby can speak out loud in Spanish, and the earbuds will give the wearer the English translation in her ear. She can then hold down her right earbud and speak in English, and her phone will project the Spanish translation from the Pixel's speaker. The live translation begins only a second or two after the person stops speaking.

    Google demoed the technology in action on Wednesday, and the earbuds quickly translated a conversation between English and Swedish--to much applause from the audience. The platform operates in 40 different languages. That's essentially like having a translator that can speak in 1,600 different language combinations right in your ear.

    The Pixel Buds can be used with the iPhone too, but only Pixel owners will be able to use tools like Translate and the Google Assistant.

    The earbuds don't have any buttons--you can adjust the volume by swiping or change music tracks by swiping. They connect to your phone wirelessly, but the two earbuds are tethered together by a cloth-like cord.

    The Pixel Buds come with a case that's also used to charge them. According to a blog post on Google's site, they can play music for about 24 hours without needing a charge.They will be available in November, conveniently just in time for your holiday shopping.

    https://www.inc.com/kevin-j-ryan/goo...ranslator.html
    Last edited by skatingfan; 10-05-2017 at 05:02 AM.

Page 36 of 39 FirstFirst ... 11263233343536373839 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •