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  1. #12691

    Re: Politics Random Random

    So, while sitting around not having a primary today in Ohio, I had a moment to contemplate the voting pattern in our county. I recently mentioned (I think in another thread) that 80% of the voters in our Congressional district who are registered as members of a party are registered as Republican.

    I looked at the data of the last census for our county. 84% are white-not-Hispanic-or-Latino; 9% African-American; 3.5% white-Hispanic-or-Latino; 3% mixed race (my partner is mixed race, and I suspect he's represented here, though I don't know what he put on the census); and a very small population of other ethnicities.

    I think it is appropriate to assume that the overwhelming majority of that African-American population votes Democratic. When you take away that 9%, and consider that "80%-registered-Republican percentage", you can see that the white population of this county is alarmingly overwhelmingly Republican. These numbers may make it even clearer why I, as an old-fart white male Democrat, with a partner who is an old-fart, mixed-race Democrat, feel so totally like a fish out of water here.

    And while these Republicans are quite racist, just like seemingly everywhere these days, the county never hesitates to brag mightily about an incredibly talented native who is possibly the most visible celebrity in this county's history: John Legend. (we are not in the county with Dayton, which, of course, has the Wright brothers and many others to brag about)

    GH

  2. #12692

    Re: Politics Random Random

    I don't like to do anything to promote Fox News but the change in tone in about a week is worth seeing. It's shocking.

    Nick Knudsen #DemCast @DemWrite
    https://twitter.com/DemWrite

    Watch the President’s propaganda network shift its tune dramatically on #coronavirus once he realized that his downplays and denials were backfiring. Surprised they didn’t get whiplash. smdh #DemCast

  3. #12693

    Re: Politics Random Random

    Quote Originally Posted by skatingfan View Post
    I don't like to do anything to promote Fox News but the change in tone in about a week is worth seeing. It's shocking.

    Nick Knudsen #DemCast @DemWrite
    https://twitter.com/DemWrite

    Watch the President’s propaganda network shift its tune dramatically on #coronavirus once he realized that his downplays and denials were backfiring. Surprised they didn’t get whiplash. smdh #DemCast
    For those who only watch Faux Tiny saying he's always considered it a pandemic will allow them to say the media is lying about his lack of response.
    There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life.”

    ― Frank Zappa





  4. #12694

    Re: Politics Random Random

    Fox News, Rupert Murdoch, and the pandemic's merchants of death

    Eric Boehlert
    Mar 18

    Since Fox News is a misinformation empire that revolves around hypocrisy, it was fitting in recent days that while Rupert Murdoch's cable channel often downplayed and minimized the novel coronavirus and assured viewers it was likely a partisan Democratic, "Deep State" plot to take down Trump just like impeachment, network executives behind the scenes were cautioning employees about the looming dangers of the pandemic.

    "Fox News CEO Suzanne Scott and network president Jay Wallace warned employees about the risks of COVID-19, and announced steps the network will take to combat its spread, including telecommuting, reduced in-studio guest bookings, and enhanced office cleanings," the Daily Beast reported.

    The two-faced operation being run at Murdoch's cable channel comes as the Fox News posts big profits while spreading blatant public health disinformation. And that's why Murdoch and Fox News have clearly emerged as this generation's merchants of death in the U.S., as the right-wing cabal puts its viewers directly at risk with an avalanche of falsehoods about the current pandemic. ("Merchants of death" was an epithet used by 1930's critics in the U.S. to attack industries and banks that supplied and funded World War I.)

    As has been noted in recent days, Fox's viewers skew older. According to Nielsen Media Research, the median age of a Fox News viewer is 67, while the Centers for Disease Control has stressed that "older adults" are "at higher risk of getting very sick" from the coronavirus. And yes, red states are getting hit just as hard by the virus today.

    People will die because of Fox News' reckless misinformation, as the channel wallows in partisan conspiracies and ushers on non-experts to whip up paranoia. On Friday, Jerry Falwell Jr, told the "Fox & Friends": “You just didn’t see it on the news 24/7 and it makes you wonder if there’s a political reason for that. Impeachment didn’t work and the Mueller report didn’t work and Article 25 [the 25th amendment to the constitution] didn’t work so maybe now this is their next attempt to get Trump.”

    "Watch the Democrats, watch the media, you start to feel like they are rooting for coronavirus to spread," warned “Fox & Friends Weekend" co-host Pete Hegseth.

    Of course, it doesn't have to be this way. "Imagine if the word flowed down from on high that Fox News should communicate to Trump that he needs to take an entirely new tack on the virus," wrote the Washington's Post's Margaret Sullivan. "Imagine if Murdoch ordered the network to end its habit of praising him as if he were the Dear Leader of an authoritarian regime and to instead use its influence to drive home the seriousness of the moment."

    That would be amazing — and it will never happen. Because as someone who has watched Murdoch operate for decades, I can assure you that anyone waiting for him, or his children who help run his media empire, to do the honorable thing is going to be waiting a very, very long time. He's a deeply dishonorable man, who's also wildly cavalier and irresponsible, and his companies reflect that.

    It's true that in the wake of Trump declaring a national pandemic emergency late last week, Fox News has shifted its talking points, now conceding that the threat is real but insisting Trump has everything under control, and that the federal government has done a herculean job containing the virus.

    Wrong and wrong.

    Fox News this week claiming Trump has saved us from coronavirus is just as dangerous as Fox News last week claiming the pandemic is a hoax. Both send the irresponsible message to viewers that the unfolding crisis is not a real threat today. And both messages reinforce a parallel universe view of the world that divides the country and makes a common conversation in times of crisis impossible to have.

    We saw this with impeachment. Taking their cues from Fox News, the Trump defense was based on lies and rattled conspiracy theories, which posed a key question: How can America have a national debate about impeachment if one side has been willingly brainwashed by Fox News?

    Brainwashing is not a term usually used when discussing mainstream American politics. But as the conservative movement becomes increasingly radicalized, using the media to brainwash its followers has become a key part of the calculation, and the political implications are enormous as we're seeing with the pandemic.

    Some folks, particularly in the D.C. press, roll their eyes when that phrase is used in connection to Fox News, and they dismiss it as hyperbole. But countless families across the country have suffered through the pain of losing a loved one to Fox News brainwashing. Today, watching a nation of elderly Fox News viewers buy into the lies about the coronavirus —It's a hoax! It's been fixed! — proves it.

    In the 1930s, the U.S. Senate held scores of hearings to investigate the “merchants of death,” and what role armament manufacturers played in the U.S.’s decision to enter World War I. When this pandemic crisis is over, a Democratic Congress should address the oversized role Murdoch and his propaganda entities play in the decay of our public life.


    https://pressrun.media/p/fox-news-ru..._3CpxgWW7kbBEo
    There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life.”

    ― Frank Zappa





  5. #12695

    Re: Politics Random Random

    Jake Sherman
    @JakeSherman
    NEWS … PELOSI is creating a HOUSE select committee on the coronavirus

    Will be chaired by JIM CLYBURN.
    There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life.”

    ― Frank Zappa





  6. #12696

    Re: Politics Random Random

    Over 10 million Americans applied for unemployment benefits in March as economy collapsed
    A record 6.65 million people filed a new jobless claim the week ended March 28

    By
    Heather Long
    April 2, 2020 at 10:56 a.m. EDT

    More than 6.6 million Americans applied for unemployment benefits last week — a record — as political and public health leaders put the economy in a deep freeze, keeping people at home and trying to slow the spread of the deadly coronavirus.

    The past two weeks have erased nearly all the jobs created in the past five years, a sign of how rapid, deep and painful the economic shutdown has been on many American families who are struggling to pay rent and health insurance costs in the midst of a pandemic.

    Job losses have skyrocketed as restaurants, hotels, gyms, and travel have shut down across the nation, but layoffs are also rising in manufacturing, warehousing and transportation, underscoring how widespread the pain of the coronavirus recession is.


    In March, more than 10 million Americans lost their jobs and applied for government aid, according to the latest Labor Department data, which includes claims filed through March 28. Many economists say the real number of people out work is probably even higher, since a lot of newly unemployed Americans haven’t been able to fill out a claim yet.

    The U.S. government has not released an official unemployment rate, but economists say it has probably jumped to 10 percent, a massive and sudden spike from February, when the nation’s unemployment rate was 3.5 percent.

    The gravity of the job losses is staggering. During the Great Recession era, the U.S. unemployment rate only hit 10 percent for one month in October 2010.

    “We’ve never seen anything like this,” said Aaron Sojourner, a labor economist at the University of Minnesota. “The scale of the job losses in the past two weeks is on par with what we saw in two years during the Great Recession."


    Economist Heidi Shierholz has spend her life studying the job market and said she was shaking when she saw the “terrifying” number of job losses in March. Shierholz is predicting 20 million Americans will be out of work by July -- the worst unemployment situation since the Great Depression. That is her “best case" scenario if Congress does another big stimulus package to aid the economy.

    Many newly unemployed have said they weren’t able to apply for unemployment benefits, because the phone lines were so swamped they could not get through.

    Gig and self-employed workers like barbers and hairdressers were also not eligible to apply until the end of March, after Congress passed the $2.2 trillion relief bill to expand who qualifies for aid. These workers are only just beginning to fill out applications.



    More Americans will likely lose their jobs in coming weeks as companies that have been trying to hold on to workers are forced to let them go or reduce their hours to almost nothing.

    Major retail chains including Macy’s, Kohl’s and J.C. Penney announced this week they are furloughing hundreds of thousands of employees, meaning they keep their health insurance but they do not get any pay because their hours are reduced to zero. These workers are also eligible for unemployment aid, but many are only just realizing they can apply.

    But the pain is spreading beyond shops and restaurants. Mercedes Addington lost her job on March 23 at a company that sells trucking parts and supplies in Kansas City, Kan. Even though the business was considered “essential” during the crisis and orders were still coming in, the company laid off most of its employees.

    Addington was on the phone with a customer placing an order when she saw everyone around her packing up their things. She put the phone briefly on mute and asked what was going on and a colleague told her they had all been fired.

    “I am very frustrated and scared. I have bills to pay soon and I was counting on this money to get by,” Addington said. “If I don’t risk it and go back to work somewhere, I’m not sure that I’ll still have a home to come back to.”

    Addington, 21, lives in a modest apartment with her boyfriend. They pay $800 a month in rent. The landlord was willing to give them a break on April rent, but only if they could prove Addington had applied for unemployment aid from the state of Kansas.

    She tried to apply right away for unemployment aid after getting laid off, but the system told her she could not complete the application until March 28. She did that and a screen popped up saying she was approved for about $300 a week in aid. But when she logged back in this week it suddenly said her benefits had been “temporarily suspended,” leaving her in limbo for rent and other bills.

    Repeated calls to the Kansas unemployment office went unanswered. She is now unsure what to do.

    “I have never applied for unemployment before and was very overwhelmed and confused,” she said.



    Congress approved additional aid for the unemployment that is supposed to increase the weekly checks by about $600 a week, a major boost in income for laid-off workers like Addington. But many states are struggling to implement the changes fast enough, and state unemployment offices do not have enough staff to handle this volume of claims and questions.

    There’s growing concern that workers losing their jobs due to the coronavirus won’t be able to return to their same position even after the health crisis ends. The longer workers are away from a job, the more they lose that attachment to their old bosses and companies.

    Nations like Denmark chose to pay all workers so they would keep their jobs, even if they are at home. But the United States has largely left it up to companies to decide what to do. Economists say it’s best if companies furlough workers like Macy’s did because at least they keep their benefits and some attachment to the company.

    “Don’t lay off your workers, furlough them,” said Shierholz. “The worker will still get benefits. They don’t lose their job. And companies don’t lose their workers.”

    There’s a growing consensus among economists that the economy is not going to bounce back easily from this recession given how deep and widespread it is becoming.


    Eric Rosengren, head of the Boston Federal Reserve since 2007, is now predicting a slower recovery since it will take more time for people to feel comfortable to go out to baseball games and restaurants again.

    “The public health aspects of this have not gone as well as they have in some other countries, so the infection rate and the mortality rate is likely to be relatively high in the United States. That also means the economic impact is likely to be more severe than in some other places,” Rosengren said.

    He urged Congress to do additional stimulus to make coronavirus treatment free.

    Andrew Van Dam and Alyssa Fowers contributed to this report.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/busin...h-coronavirus/
    There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life.”

    ― Frank Zappa





  7. #12697
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    Re: Politics Random Random

    All Requests for Proposals released by the State of South Dakota include the following restriction:

    • Restriction of Boycott of Israel (Sec 1.8): The bidder or offeror, in preparing its response or offer or in considering proposals submitted from qualified, potential vendors, suppliers, and subcontractors, or in the solicitation, selection, or commercial treatment of any vendor, supplier, or subcontractor, has not refused to transact business activities, has not terminated business activities, and has not taken other similar actions intended to limit its commercial relations, related to the subject matter of the bid or offer, with a person or entity on the basis of Israeli national origin, or residence or incorporation in Israel or its territories, with the specific intent to accomplish a boycott or divestment of Israel in a discriminatory manner.
    Winston, a.k.a. Alvena Rae Risley Hiatt (1944-2019), RIP

  8. #12698

    Re: Politics Random Random

    VoteVets @votevets
    Retired Navy Captain Larry Seaquist is not mincing words, in support of Captain Brett Crozier, who was just relieved of command of the USS Teddy Roosevelt.

    https://twitter.com/i/status/1246190191670448134
    There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life.”

    ― Frank Zappa





  9. #12699

    Re: Politics Random Random

    Quote Originally Posted by dryrunguy View Post
    All Requests for Proposals released by the State of South Dakota include the following restriction:

    • Restriction of Boycott of Israel (Sec 1.8): The bidder or offeror, in preparing its response or offer or in considering proposals submitted from qualified, potential vendors, suppliers, and subcontractors, or in the solicitation, selection, or commercial treatment of any vendor, supplier, or subcontractor, has not refused to transact business activities, has not terminated business activities, and has not taken other similar actions intended to limit its commercial relations, related to the subject matter of the bid or offer, with a person or entity on the basis of Israeli national origin, or residence or incorporation in Israel or its territories, with the specific intent to accomplish a boycott or divestment of Israel in a discriminatory manner.
    Interesting. If I'm understanding this correctly, this strikes me as a contract clause that has yet to be challenged and therefore struck down in court. I don't see that holding up because it doesn't seem like a regular anti-discrimination clause, but rather something that would limit Freedom of Speech rights, i.e. protesting Netanyahu's practices against Palestine. Think of South Africa during Apartheid. In the later decades, mostly under public pressure, corporations boycotted aka divested from the country as a form of protest against their system of Apartheid.

  10. #12700

    Re: Politics Random Random

    In some other election/voter suppression news:
    Kentucky governor vetoes voter ID bill
    BRUCE SCHREINER
    Associated PressApril 3, 2020, 3:45 PM MST
    FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — Democratic Gov. Andy Beshear on Friday vetoed a bill pushed by Republican lawmakers to require Kentucky residents to show a government-issued photo ID in order to vote.

    In his veto message, the governor said the measure would create an obstacle to voting, resulting in fewer people casting ballots and “undermining our democracy.”

    Beshear, a former state attorney general, added that the bill seeks to “resolve a problem that does not exist," pointing to the absence of voter impersonation cases in Kentucky.

    Secretary of State Michael Adams urged lawmakers to override the veto. The measure passed the Senate and House by wide enough margins to overcome a veto. The GOP-led legislature is scheduled to reconvene April 13.

    “I ask the legislators of both parties who believe in election integrity and passed this law to override this regrettable veto, and I hope the governor will eventually join me in governing from the center,” Adams said in a statement.

    Adams, a Republican, campaigned on the issue en route to his election victory last year. The bill's lead sponsor is GOP Sen. Robby Mills.

    The measure would require Kentucky residents to produce a photo ID when voting, with limited exceptions, starting with the November election.

    People lacking their photo ID at the polls could vote by provisional ballot and later produce that ID to enable their ballot to be counted. Or voters could cast their ballots if recognized by an election officer, who would have to sign a document affirming to knowing the voter.

    The bill’s supporters have noted that a photo ID already is required for many other transactions, including opening a bank account, cashing a check or picking up sports tickets at will-call.

    The bill's opponents countered that the photo ID requirement would reduce turnout among minorities, the poor, the elderly and disabled voters. They also objected to a “rushed timeline” to implement the photo ID requirement just months before a high-stakes general election.

    In November, Kentuckians will vote for a president and decide one of the nation’s highest-profile campaigns: Republican Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s bid for reelection.

    On Friday, Beshear also objected to the bill's timing, coming in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic. The offices where people could obtain a photo ID needed to vote are currently closed and it's uncertain when they will reopen, the governor said.

    “The fact that someone would need something to vote that right now they absolutely can’t get because of the coronavirus, yes, I think is a wrong move, and it absolutely needed to be vetoed,” Beshear said at his daily coronavirus-related briefing.


    Well, it isn't anything else is going on that might need the government's attention.
    "And for my next fearless prediction..."

  11. #12701
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    Re: Politics Random Random

    Quote Originally Posted by JazzNU View Post
    Interesting. If I'm understanding this correctly, this strikes me as a contract clause that has yet to be challenged and therefore struck down in court. I don't see that holding up because it doesn't seem like a regular anti-discrimination clause, but rather something that would limit Freedom of Speech rights, i.e. protesting Netanyahu's practices against Palestine. Think of South Africa during Apartheid. In the later decades, mostly under public pressure, corporations boycotted aka divested from the country as a form of protest against their system of Apartheid.
    I just assumed it was something proposed by some right-wing nutjob to be included in all state procurements that, somehow, got passed by the state legislature. (Which, I guess, shouldn't be all that surprising.)

    As we delve more into state-specific work, I continue to be surprised by what I see in state-specific procurement solicitations. For example, late in 2019, we pursued a contract with the State of New Jersey (we won it, BTW) where we had to prove neither we nor the company that technically owns us had business dealings in Iran. I understood the gist of it; but if you're going to go there, why just Iran?

    Bizarre.
    Winston, a.k.a. Alvena Rae Risley Hiatt (1944-2019), RIP

  12. #12702

    Re: Politics Random Random

    Dry, If we had time (which I don't while school is still in session), a really interesting exercise would be to come up with the most ridiculous laws on the books in the 50 states. There are some that are left over from previous centuries (and not just the last century), and others, like the one about Israel, that are just as ridiculous, but more recent. If anyone has time on their hands, please feel free to post some of those laws. They are always good for a laugh or a sigh. GH

  13. #12703

    Re: Politics Random Random

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff in TX View Post
    In some other election/voter suppression news:
    Kentucky governor vetoes voter ID bill
    BRUCE SCHREINER
    Associated PressApril 3, 2020, 3:45 PM MST
    FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — Democratic Gov. Andy Beshear on Friday vetoed a bill pushed by Republican lawmakers to require Kentucky residents to show a government-issued photo ID in order to vote.

    In his veto message, the governor said the measure would create an obstacle to voting, resulting in fewer people casting ballots and “undermining our democracy.”

    Beshear, a former state attorney general, added that the bill seeks to “resolve a problem that does not exist," pointing to the absence of voter impersonation cases in Kentucky.

    Secretary of State Michael Adams urged lawmakers to override the veto. The measure passed the Senate and House by wide enough margins to overcome a veto. The GOP-led legislature is scheduled to reconvene April 13.

    “I ask the legislators of both parties who believe in election integrity and passed this law to override this regrettable veto, and I hope the governor will eventually join me in governing from the center,” Adams said in a statement.

    Adams, a Republican, campaigned on the issue en route to his election victory last year. The bill's lead sponsor is GOP Sen. Robby Mills.

    The measure would require Kentucky residents to produce a photo ID when voting, with limited exceptions, starting with the November election.

    People lacking their photo ID at the polls could vote by provisional ballot and later produce that ID to enable their ballot to be counted. Or voters could cast their ballots if recognized by an election officer, who would have to sign a document affirming to knowing the voter.

    The bill’s supporters have noted that a photo ID already is required for many other transactions, including opening a bank account, cashing a check or picking up sports tickets at will-call.

    The bill's opponents countered that the photo ID requirement would reduce turnout among minorities, the poor, the elderly and disabled voters. They also objected to a “rushed timeline” to implement the photo ID requirement just months before a high-stakes general election.

    In November, Kentuckians will vote for a president and decide one of the nation’s highest-profile campaigns: Republican Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s bid for reelection.

    On Friday, Beshear also objected to the bill's timing, coming in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic. The offices where people could obtain a photo ID needed to vote are currently closed and it's uncertain when they will reopen, the governor said.

    “The fact that someone would need something to vote that right now they absolutely can’t get because of the coronavirus, yes, I think is a wrong move, and it absolutely needed to be vetoed,” Beshear said at his daily coronavirus-related briefing.


    Well, it isn't anything else is going on that might need the government's attention.
    See the state is going all out to protect "Daddy" lead henchmen. The voters need to remove the lead henchmen. What did the lead henchmen competitor had to say about this?
    2017 & 2018 Australian Open Champions

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