Agree Agree:  2,079
Likes Likes:  2,261
Page 753 of 753 FirstFirst ... 503653703728743749750751752753
Results 11,281 to 11,293 of 11293
  1. #11281

    Re: Politics Random Random

    It makes me want to punch her in the face. Sorry, but it does.
    Meet again we do, old foe...

  2. #11282

    Re: Politics Random Random

    How does this make you feel?

    Claude Taylor‏Verified account
    @TrueFactsStated

    Eyes on the Prize. This is the kind of stuff the WhackJobs are putting out. Keep pushing-the Democracy you save may be your own.

    "For the person that we know in the daytime, we don't need to light a lamp to see his face at night." Ghanaian Proverb


  3. #11283
    Forum Director
    Forum Moderator

    Awards Showcase

    Asteroids Champion, 123 GO Champion, Ball Of Madness Champion, Solitare Champion, Deal or No Deal Champion, Penguin Arcade Champion, Yeti Sports 8- Jungle Swing Champion, Putt it in Golf Champion, Yetisports 10 - Icicle Climb Champion, mahjong Champion, 247 Mini Golf Champion, Flash Golf Champion, Battleship Champion, Magic Towers Solitaire Champion dryrunguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    South Central PA
    Posts
    50,504
    Blog Entries
    11

    Re: Politics Random Random

    Quote Originally Posted by Drop-shot View Post
    It makes me want to punch her in the face. Sorry, but it does.
    At least her sign is spelled correctly.
    Become a Kiva lender and help people lift themselves out of poverty. To find loans that are safe, secular, and mostly short in term, go to the A+ Convenience Store at http://starfish.dynalias.org/starred...venience-store. Or, if you would like to support repeat borrowers with a proven track record of repayment, check out CraigsList at http://starfish.dynalias.org/starred/craigslist. Happy lending!

  4. #11284
    Everyday Warrior MJ2004's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    2,801

    Re: Politics Random Random

    Ah, fun stuff.

    I’ve spent 20 years believing I was trusted to report the news objectively. Then I went to Kentucky
    Half of Americans think the media is making up the news. Can journalists ever regain their trust?


    Andrew Edgecliffe-Johnson reports from Bowling Green, Financial Times

    Kevin Willis remembers the moment he heard about the massacre. The news director for WKU, the national public radio station for western Kentucky, was checking overnight messages in the gym on a February morning when he saw the first of the tweets urging him to start reporting on the Bowling Green massacre.

    “I can’t tell you the fear that shot up through me,” he recalls, sitting in the cramped Bowling Green studio from which he broadcasts his drive-time shows. Had he slept through an atrocity on his own doorstep?

    It didn’t take Willis much reporting to establish that there had been no bloodbath. The night before, Kellyanne Conway, counsellor to Donald Trump, had defended the president’s planned travel ban by telling an interviewer that two Iraqi refugees had been “the masterminds behind the Bowling Green massacre”. In a familiar swipe at the media, she added: “Most people don’t know that because it didn’t get covered.”

    The media didn’t cover it because it didn’t happen. Conway appears to have been referring to the 2011 conviction of two Bowling Green-based Iraqis on charges of trying to aid al-Qaeda in Iraq, but — as NPR and others had reported at the time — they conducted no attack in the US. Conway’s “alternative facts” made headlines for a few days, with liberal commentators expressing concern at a White House staffer’s misrepresentation while conservative outlets sympathetically aired her retaliatory jabs at a press pack the president has dubbed the enemy of the American people.

    I don’t remember when I heard about the massacre that wasn’t. As the FT’s US news editor I have consumed more reporting about the news and the noise Trump has generated than I can retain, and this was a sideshow we decided not to cover. But in the nine months since that mini-media storm, I have watched as it has become clearer that my trade has a far bigger problem to worry about than the credibility of information flowing from the Trump White House: most Americans don’t believe us.

    According to Gallup, Americans’ trust in mass media peaked at 72 per cent in 1976, the year All The President’s Men hit cinemas. By last year, that figure had plunged to 32 per cent — just 14 per cent among Republicans.

    America is not unique in this, but in few countries are views of journalists more defined by party allegiance and in no other has a president so weaponised that mistrust. In October alone, Trump took aim at media targets in more than 30 tweets, mused that broadcasters’ licences may have to be revoked for “distorted” coverage and told Fox News — one network he consistently applauds — how proud he was of branding the fourth estate as phoney.

    He has every reason to count this as an accomplishment as his war with the media (or that definition of it that excludes Breitbart, Drudge, Fox and much of talk radio) is working. A Politico/Morning Consult poll in October found 46 per cent of Americans believe news organisations fabricate Trump stories, and more than three quarters of Republicans think we are making it up. Far more Americans now define “fake news” as sloppy or biased reporting than White House spin.

    Knowing the consequences my colleagues and I would face if we fabricated a story, I find such polls baffling and alarming. It is tempting to quibble with the methodology or even to despair of those who don’t understand how we work. But it feels more important to examine how we became so vulnerable to the “fake news” charge.

    So, wanting a change of perspective after too long at a desk in New York, I set out to ask why so many people doubt the news — and how we might reconnect with those Americans who sincerely see us as liars. Bowling Green, an unwitting byword for fake news in a once-blue, red state, seemed a good place to start. Famous for a civil war battle, the National Corvette Museum and resident Republican senator Rand Paul, the 65,000-soul city sits in a county that voted 62.5 per cent for Trump. Scanning talk radio stations on the short drive from Nashville to the town’s quiet main square, it’s not hard to find hosts who like to emphasise Barack Hussein Obama’s middle name, and at the Smokey Pig barbecue joint you can be sure to find the TV tuned to Fox. But Bowling Green is also home to liberal students on Western Kentucky University’s growing campus and a centre that has resettled more than 10,000 refugees since 1981. It is no caricature of Trump Country.

    “I think places like Bowling Green is what the majority of the country feels,” says Chris Karraker, the owner of Blue Holler Brew Supplies, where he pours local pints to voters of all persuasions from behind a long wooden bar.

    When he talks about fake news, Conway’s made-up massacre is not what he has in mind. “I don’t believe half the stuff I read or hear on the news,” he says. “CNN, ABC, Fox, I’m going to say 75 per cent of the stories are true, but the facts aren’t in the story: it’s personal opinion.” It is more than four decades since Walter Cronkite was voted the most trusted man in America, and Karraker hankers for the straight delivery the late CBS News anchor personified. “The biggest problem is that everybody’s forgot that the leftwing and the rightwing are still wings of the same bird. They’re supposed to work together to fly.”

    Karraker likes to fact-check his social media feed, and says the suspicions about Clinton that led him to vote for Trump were not driven by believing every rightwing conspiracy theory about her he found through Facebook. Some seem to have stuck, however. “Was there 45 people that she was closely involved with and against in politics mysteriously showed up dead? Do I believe that? No, but if it’s just two of them, is it OK? See what I’m saying? You only believe a certain percentage of what you hear.”

    Karraker winces at Trump’s freewheeling use of Twitter, and offers that the president has brought some of his bad press upon himself, but he complains that the press isn’t “giving the man a chance”. His customers voice their agreement as Karraker makes his broader point: the media “want to focus . . . on the bad stuff” like this summer’s white supremacist violence in Charlottesville, Virginia. “It’s not good for our country,” he argues: “Unfortunately the squeaky wheel seems to be the only thing that gets covered. Day to day normal life that is good in this country, nobody ever says anything about.”

    Nobody, perhaps, except Joe Imel, the director of media operations at the Bowling Green Daily News. He monitors the ageing presses of the 163-year-old paper with a police scanner in hand and a pillar-of-the-community appetite for school board meetings and little league results.

    “You guys cover the flash and trash. We’re the ones sitting down and covering the day in and day out things,” he tells us. The family-owned Daily News has 21 people left in its newsroom, down by a quarter since 2009, and “if we were to go away, you’d never know they’d raised your taxes”, Imel notes. Even in Bowling Green, though, headlines about sex and drugs do better online than tax stories.

    Imel, 52, is something of a town celebrity: by tweeting nuggets of news from the scanner, he has accrued 46,000 Twitter followers — almost three times his print circulation. He does hear occasional accusations of bias, mostly when online readers confuse editorials with its “right down the middle” reporting, he says, but he is at pains not to let his politics show, in the news pages or his tweets. “Even journalists in this day and age have lost their mind on social media,” he says.

    The paper’s conservative editorial page was one of the few to endorse Trump but its news stance is summed up by a photo on Imel’s desk of Dragnet’s Joe Friday, stamped with the 1950s TV sergeant’s misattributed catchphrase: “Just the facts, man.”

    There are two snags with Karraker and Imel’s facts-only ideal, though, says Sam Ford, an MIT research affiliate who grew up outside Bowling Green and studied its news ecosystem this summer for a Columbia University report on how to address media polarisation. First, he says, “a lot of ‘just the facts, man’ journalism is written in a way that’s inaccessible”, which drives audiences to less dry, more polarising media voices. Second, whatever people say they want, “What gets the most traffic? The bloodbaths and the partisan stuff.”

    Ford got his first newspaper job at 12, when he took over his grandmother’s society column. Before Facebook and its filter bubbles, it appeared in papers across Ohio County, keeping track of the births, marriages and gatherings that made a community feel connected.

    Now, “most journalists are from somewhere else”, Ford says. As Craigslist and Walmart hollowed out local news business models, America’s remaining journalism jobs became concentrated in cosmopolitan, economically successful and liberal coastal cities. If you only meet a reporter when they parachute in from Washington or New York to cover an election, a natural disaster or a (real or fake) massacre, “that changes the relationship a community has to journalism”, Ford observes.

    I am conscious as I drive around Kentucky of the easily mocked “safari to Trump Country” genre of journalism that has sprung up post-election. As The Atlantic put it, “group after group of befuddled elites has criss-crossed America to poke and prod and try to figure out what they missed”. I’m also aware that I’m not a dispassionate observer. While I am in Kentucky asking why people have soured on journalists, I get an email from an FT subscriber from DeKalb, Illinois. Richard Ryan, a self-described fiscal conservative, writes: “I am tired of all of the negative press on the Trump administration . . . I am not a Trump fan, but really, do we need MORE of this continual harping?” I decide to call him up.

    Ryan doesn’t think we are making up stories, but thinks the press spends too much time speculating on the president’s possible motives and finding fault with them. “Has he done nothing right at all?” he asks. Across the media, “I just find the reporting just assumes that we all hate Trump . . . The press are all in the same circles at cocktail parties.”

    There are no cocktails on the menu at the OC Cafe in Beaver Dam, Ohio County. We have made the 45-minute drive from Bowling Green to sit down with local journalists over startlingly sweet iced tea. Seth Dukes, 26, became editor of the cash-strapped local paper last year with just three months’ journalism experience to his name. Dustin and Lee Bratcher, the sons of a Kentucky miner, founded an online news site, The Ohio County Monitor, in 2012.

    In politics as in media, Lee says, “a lot of these folks, they don’t really hear anybody out there speaking to them”. When Trump came along and acknowledged rural voters, it was “almost like a religious experience”. Lee extends his analogy to explain why Trump’s strongest supporters are unlikely to be swayed by critical reporting about their man. “A lot of people were converted to Trump and when you’re down for someone that much, there is going to have to be incontrovertible proof that he did what they’re saying he did.”

    The Bratchers, who record the town meetings they cover so any doubters can hear what happened for themselves, question whether Washington scoops that rely on unnamed sources are sufficiently incontrovertible. “It’s like ‘Well, who are these people? You can say they’re in the White House but are they the janitor that just happened to walk by?’,” Lee says. (I sincerely doubt it, but this suspicion is widely held.)

    The brothers sound pessimistic about the rifts in the national discourse healing anytime soon. “People are set in what they’re doing,” says Lee. “And if you say something that they don’t like, then [they say] ‘I’ll cut you off. I don’t need you in my life.’ ”

    Willis, the Bowling Green public radio host, tells a similar story: he has noticed that his station has been getting fewer complaints about liberal bias. “I don’t believe that’s because the individuals who would complain have changed their mind. I believe they’ve simply gone elsewhere,” he says.

    This clustering in content comfort zones has consequences. As Robert Mueller’s probe into Russian interference in 2016’s election gathers pace, for example, Fox viewers are hearing starkly different stories about it from the ones told on MSNBC. Americans’ confidence in what happens next may depend on which narrative they believe.

    Trump did not invent the idea of “mainstream” reporters being “leftwing, elite bogeymen who hate America”, Willis points out, but he has rebranded it masterfully for the #FakeNews age. That, he argues, has put the president in a remarkable position: after any unwelcome report “all he has to do is simply say, ‘This is fake news; this is another media attempt to tear down this administration’, and I think for many supporters that’s it.”

    Willis’s studio sits on Western Kentucky University’s campus, where a new generation is absorbing Journalism 101 messages about ethics, transparency and getting all sides of a story in classrooms where you’re never far from a copy of the First Amendment. Tim Broekema, a photojournalism professor, invites me to talk to his students, who are well aware of the disconnect between their idealism and the cynicism with which many Americans see their chosen profession. “I’m trying to help people and they’re accusing me of just lying to them but I’m not,” says Remi Mays, who is studying photojournalism and Arabic so she can tell the stories of women in the Arabic-speaking world.

    Chuck Clark, WKU’s director of student publications, keeps a framed Flannery O’Connor quote on his shelf to remind the college paper’s young reporters that “the truth doesn’t change because of our ability to stomach it”. The president “is making it his mission to destroy the American public’s confidence in journalism”, Clark contends, but that has only invigorated his students. He hopes that they will be the ones to win the battle for trust in journalism. “If you lose the press, you lose democracy. Simple as that.”

    Maybe it will take a generation to resolve America’s deep-seated distrust of its news media, but I learnt some journalism lessons of my own in Kentucky. I discovered that the patrons of Karraker’s bar find fact-checking their social media feeds as stressful as I do, that news fatigue is chasing audiences away, and that even those in partisan bubbles worry that news polarisation is souring their relationships with family, friends and their community. As Andrea Wenzel, Ford’s co-author on the Columbia study, observed: “No matter which side people were coming from, nobody was happy about the status quo.”

    I was also reminded that journalists play into critics’ hands when we make sloppy mistakes, are too consumed by the sensational and neglect to separate opinion from news. And I heard constructive ideas, too. Our industry can be more transparent about how news is made; we can engage more directly with our audiences, in person and online; we can spend more time away from our big city offices, and partner with local newsrooms on stories that travel.

    We can make space for “solutions journalism”, which, as Ford puts it, “is not about balancing bad news with puppies”, but highlighting constructive responses to the challenges that most worry our audiences. We might even take a leaf from Trump’s book by talking less like politicians and acknowledging the existence of communities such as Bowling Green. Most important, perhaps, we can start by admitting we have a deep-seated trust problem that will not go away on its own. A week in Kentucky has also reminded me of what has not changed: the power of setting down the clearly attributed facts of a big story and the pleasure of well-crafted storytelling.

    The year the fake news narrative took off has also seen some memorable journalism. The growth in subscriptions to organisations from the Washington Post to The New Yorker suggests high-quality reporting is being rewarded. Gallup and Reuters/Ipsos polls have even found the number of Americans expressing confidence in the press has ticked up in recent months.

    I make one more stop as I drive to Nashville for the flight back to New York. Gold City Grocery is surrounded by fields. At the petrol pump outside, a tractor is refuelling under a sign advertising a cola brand that has not bothered Coke and Pepsi for decades. Inside is what’s known as a liars table, where regulars discuss the issues of the day. The walls are decorated with deer heads; rallying cries for God, the military and the Second Amendment; and a picture of a handgun with the warning to would-be miscreants: “We don’t dial 911”.

    James Neal, the dungaree-clad proprietor, says he prefers to get his news from his patrons than from journalists, who are “so biased” against people with his views. (“If the white man says anything out of line, he’s racist,” he complains.) I hadn’t framed my trust-in-news question as one about Trump but, like most people I have met in Kentucky, he turns immediately to the media’s misreading of this president’s voters. Trump “was voted in by the popular vote”, Neal insists, before I can nitpick about the Electoral College, “but now all you hear about is all these protests . . . The story that benefits the country, they don’t cover, but the one that hurts somebody, that’s what they want.”

    Journalists are afraid of Trump because he had “the balls to stand up for . . . our freedom”, Neal argues, adding that he respects the president because “he don’t beat around the bush. He tells it exactly like it is.” Reporters’ prejudices blinded them to Trump’s chances of victory last year, he says; now they are twisting the president’s words to emphasise scandal and division.

    “When I watch the news, he didn’t say it like that. They spliced it the way they liked it . . . so it’s totally different from what he actually said,” Neal says. His customers chorus in agreement.

    So what could journalists do to restore Neal’s trust, I ask? “Nothin’,” he replies flatly, pausing for a moment before adding for emphasis: “Absolutely nothin’.”

    The writer is the FT’s US news editor

  5. #11285

    Re: Politics Random Random

    Sometimes I wonder if the fact that in every other movie/TV show American institutions are portrayed as evil (the FBI, the CIA, the Army, the Government in general) that makes Americans so distrustful of everything.
    And the thing is: you don't trust the media. Then, what effort do you do to get your info? The correct one.
    Starry starry night

  6. #11286

    Re: Politics Random Random

    It's the dumbing down of the US that has made it so these people believe what they believe. None of them know anything about civics because it's just not taught anymore. The RW has told them for years that their opinions are just as valid as someone who has spent years mastering a subject. And never, ever downplay the role of Rupert Murdoch.
    "For the person that we know in the daytime, we don't need to light a lamp to see his face at night." Ghanaian Proverb


  7. #11287
    Everyday Warrior MJ2004's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    2,801

    Re: Politics Random Random

    What Ti said. If we had an Education thread, I would have thrown the article in there, since a direct line can be drawn from one to the other.

  8. #11288
    Senior Staff
    Forum Moderator

    Awards Showcase

    shtexas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    24,188

    Re: Politics Random Random

    Coup? Langley? WTF?

    Sent from my SM-J327P using Tapatalk

  9. #11289

    Re: Politics Random Random

    ABC News‏Verified account
    @ABC
    5m5 minutes ago
    More
    NEW: Attorney General Sessions announces $98 million in grant funding for law enforcement to hire community policing officers; applicants received extra points for "certifying their willingness to cooperate with federal immigration authorities within their detention facilities."

    "For the person that we know in the daytime, we don't need to light a lamp to see his face at night." Ghanaian Proverb


  10. #11290
    Forum Director
    Forum Moderator

    Awards Showcase

    Asteroids Champion, 123 GO Champion, Ball Of Madness Champion, Solitare Champion, Deal or No Deal Champion, Penguin Arcade Champion, Yeti Sports 8- Jungle Swing Champion, Putt it in Golf Champion, Yetisports 10 - Icicle Climb Champion, mahjong Champion, 247 Mini Golf Champion, Flash Golf Champion, Battleship Champion, Magic Towers Solitaire Champion dryrunguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    South Central PA
    Posts
    50,504
    Blog Entries
    11

    Re: Politics Random Random

    So... To get to my personal email, I have to go through a news page first. The content of the news page, I think, is determined by my ISP.

    The was the top news item this morning. If you only have enough "evidence" of this to produce a 12-page report, your evidence is rather skimpy, no?

    *****

    FBI Report On Black 'Extremists' Raises Fears Of Targeting Law Enforcement

    WASHINGTON (AP) — An FBI report on the rise of black "extremists" is stirring fears of a return to practices used during the civil rights movement, when the bureau spied on activist groups without evidence they had broken any laws.

    The FBI said it doesn't target specific groups, and the report is one of many its intelligence analysts produce to make law enforcement aware of what they see as emerging trends. A similar bulletin on white supremacists, for example, came out about the same time.

    The 12-page report, issued in August, says "black identity extremists" are increasingly targeting law enforcement after police killings of black men, especially since the shooting of Michael Brown roiled Ferguson, Missouri, in 2014. The report describes cases in which "extremists" had "acted in retaliation for perceived past police brutality incidents." It warned that such violence was likely to continue.

    Black leaders and activists were outraged after Foreign Policy revealed the existence of the report last month. The Congressional Black Caucus, in a letter to FBI Director Christopher Wray, said the report "conflates black political activists with dangerous domestic terrorist organizations" and would further erode the frayed relationship between police and minority communities.

    "I have never met a black extremist. I don't know what the FBI is talking about," said Chris Phillips, a filmmaker in Ferguson.

    Before the Trump administration, the report might not have caused such alarm. The FBI noted it issued a similar bulletin warning of retaliatory violence by "black separatist extremists" in March 2016, when the country had a black president, Barack Obama, and black attorney general, Loretta Lynch.

    But black voters overwhelmingly opposed Donald Trump. And they are suspicious of his administration, which has been criticized as insensitive on racial issues, including when Trump was slow to condemn white nationalist protesters following a deadly rally in Charlottesville, Virginia.

    Attorney General Jeff Sessions, a former Alabama senator whose career has been dogged by questions about race and his commitment to civil rights, did not ease lawmakers' concerns when he was unable to answer questions about the report or its origins during a congressional hearing this past week.

    Sessions said he was aware of "groups that do have an extraordinary commitment to their racial identity, and some have transformed themselves even into violent activists." He struggled to answer the same question about white extremists.

    It wouldn't be unusual for an attorney general not to have seen such an FBI assessment, which the FBI creates on its own to circulate internally among law enforcement agencies. But the exchange with Rep. Karen Bass, a Los Angeles Democrat, presented an uncomfortable moment.

    "What worries me about this terribly is that this is that it is a flashback to the past," Bass said after the hearing. She said she was especially concerned after receiving complaints from members of Black Lives Matter, who said they were being monitored and harassed by police in her district.

    The group rallies after racially charged encounters with police, but it is not mentioned in the FBI's intelligence assessment. Even so, Bass said she worried the report will send a message to police that it's OK to crack down on groups critical of law enforcement.

    The FBI does not comment on its intelligence bulletins, which usually are not public. In a statement, the FBI said it cannot and will not open an investigation based solely on a person's race or exercise of free speech rights.

    "Our focus is not on membership in particular groups but on individuals who commit violence and other criminal acts," the FBI said. "Furthermore, the FBI does not and will not police ideology. When an individual takes violent action based on belief or ideology and breaks the law, the FBI will enforce the rule of law."

    The assessments are designed to help law enforcement agencies stay ahead of emerging problems and should not be seen as a sign of a broader enforcement strategy, said Jeffrey Ringel, a former FBI agent and Joint Terrorism Task force member who now works for the Soufan Group, a private security firm. Agencies can decide for themselves whether the assessment reflects a real problem, he said.

    Still, some veterans of the black and Latino civil rights movement said the FBI assessment reminded them of the bureau's now-defunct COINTELPRO, a covert and often illegal operation under Director J. Edgar Hoover in the 1950s and 1960s. Agents were assigned at the time to "expose, disrupt, misdirect, or otherwise neutralize the activities of black nationalists," Hoover said in a once-classified memo to field agents.

    David Correia, an American Studies professor at the University of New Mexico, said the new memo carries a similar message.

    "It's part of their playbook," he said. "They try to characterize legitimate concerns about something like police violence as somehow a danger so they can disrupt protests." The FBI used a similar tactic to try to cause confusion among New Mexico Hispanic land grant activists in the 1960s, he said.

    The cases listed in the new bulletin include that of a sniper who said he was upset about police treatment of minorities before killing five officers during a protest in Dallas, and a man who wrote of the need to inflict violence on "bad cops" before killing three in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. In each of the cases, the FBI alleges the suspects were connected to radical ideologies linked to black nationalism.

    Phillips, who is set to release a film about the shooting of Brown and its aftermath, said if the FBI were really worried about unrest, it should turn its focus to the concerns of the people "who are protesting in the streets" instead of targeting people who face discrimination daily.

    http://centurylink.net/news/read/art.../category/news
    Become a Kiva lender and help people lift themselves out of poverty. To find loans that are safe, secular, and mostly short in term, go to the A+ Convenience Store at http://starfish.dynalias.org/starred...venience-store. Or, if you would like to support repeat borrowers with a proven track record of repayment, check out CraigsList at http://starfish.dynalias.org/starred/craigslist. Happy lending!

  11. #11291
    Everyday Warrior MJ2004's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    2,801

    Re: Politics Random Random

    Speaking of education, I'm taking a course. My professor just posted this quote:

    "Education is simply the soul of a society as it passes from one generation to another." - G. K. Chesterton

    All I can think is, what does this say about our society, and not in a good way.

  12. #11292

    Re: Politics Random Random


    Getty

    REP. JOE BARTON APOLOGIZES FOR SENDING JUNK PICS
    And Sexting Woman

    Texas Congressman Joe Barton sent nudes and illicit text messages to a woman, and he's apologizing for the graphic image first revealed by a Twitter user.

    Barton, a Republican, sent the nude photo showing his penis. The Twitter user censored the image, and also revealed a sext that reads, "I want u soo bad. Right now."

    http://www.tmz.com/2017/11/22/texas-...xting-twitter/

    Of course TMZ posted the picture. It's the day before Thanksgiving. I don't anyone to be unable to enjoy the festivities.

    "For the person that we know in the daytime, we don't need to light a lamp to see his face at night." Ghanaian Proverb


  13. #11293
    Forum Director
    Forum Moderator

    Awards Showcase

    Asteroids Champion, 123 GO Champion, Ball Of Madness Champion, Solitare Champion, Deal or No Deal Champion, Penguin Arcade Champion, Yeti Sports 8- Jungle Swing Champion, Putt it in Golf Champion, Yetisports 10 - Icicle Climb Champion, mahjong Champion, 247 Mini Golf Champion, Flash Golf Champion, Battleship Champion, Magic Towers Solitaire Champion dryrunguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    South Central PA
    Posts
    50,504
    Blog Entries
    11

    Re: Politics Random Random

    I must have missed the day in school when they pulled aside all the boys and taught them, "Girls REALLY want to see pictures of your junk." Especially when you're old and the damn thing probably needs to be ironed before used...
    Become a Kiva lender and help people lift themselves out of poverty. To find loans that are safe, secular, and mostly short in term, go to the A+ Convenience Store at http://starfish.dynalias.org/starred...venience-store. Or, if you would like to support repeat borrowers with a proven track record of repayment, check out CraigsList at http://starfish.dynalias.org/starred/craigslist. Happy lending!

Page 753 of 753 FirstFirst ... 503653703728743749750751752753

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •