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  1. #1111

    Re: Let's Discuss Science

    Sopan Deb ‏@SopanDeb 2m2 minutes ago
    A French presidential candidate is offering refuge in France for U.S. scientists and entrepreneurs:
    http://reut.rs/2l8MB8B

    "For the person that we know in the daytime, we don't need to light a lamp to see his face at night." Ghanaian Proverb


  2. #1112

    Re: Let's Discuss Science

    "A 5-day summer school will be offered at Tufts University from August 7-11, 2017, with the principal purpose of training mathematicians to be expert witnesses for court cases on redistricting and gerrymandering.... The summer school is aimed at, but not limited to, people with doctoral training in mathematics."

    https://sites.tufts.edu/gerrymandr/

  3. #1113
    Everyday Warrior MJ2004's Avatar
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    Re: Let's Discuss Science

    We can provide a free room. I'm sure there would be no shortage of volunteers. My dad is a retired math PhD, maybe I can convince him to pursue a second career.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  4. #1114

    Re: Let's Discuss Science

    Isn't there a scientist's march planned for the spring?
    "For the person that we know in the daytime, we don't need to light a lamp to see his face at night." Ghanaian Proverb


  5. #1115

    Re: Let's Discuss Science

    Quote Originally Posted by Ti-Amie View Post
    Isn't there a scientist's march planned for the spring?
    More than 100 being planned, most on April 22 (Earth Day):
    https://twitter.com/ScienceMarchDC/l...arches/members

  6. #1116

    Re: Let's Discuss Science

    Countries with science marches planned:

    United Kingdom, France, Germany, Switzerland, Ireland, Norway, Belgium, the Netherlands, Australia, New Zealand

    http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2017/...ight-countries

  7. #1117

    Re: Let's Discuss Science

    Thanks Ribbons. I'm following as many of the rogue science accounts I can on Twitter.
    "For the person that we know in the daytime, we don't need to light a lamp to see his face at night." Ghanaian Proverb


  8. #1118

    Re: Let's Discuss Science

    Bogus Daily Mail Story Spearheads Latest Right-Wing Assault On Climate Change Science
    Research ››› 16 min 23 sec ago ››› KEVIN KALHOEFER

    A story by David Rose of the British tabloid Daily Mail falsely alleged that researchers at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) “manipulated global warming data” in order to “dupe” world leaders into agreeing to provisions of the 2015 Paris climate agreement. In reality, the NOAA report’s finding that there was no slowdown in the rate of global warming has since been independently verified by other experts, and it’s the Daily Mail story -- and the GOP politicians and right-wing media outlets like Breitbart News championing it -- that are distorting climate science to score political points.



    https://mediamatters.org/research/20...science/215257
    "For the person that we know in the daytime, we don't need to light a lamp to see his face at night." Ghanaian Proverb


  9. #1119

    Re: Let's Discuss Science

    I've been wondering whether I should start carrying my passport everywhere, but it's starting to look like that won't be nearly enough...

    Bikkannavar’s reentry into the country should not have raised any flags. Not only is he a natural-born US citizen, but he’s also enrolled in Global Entry — a program through CBP that allows individuals who have undergone background checks to have expedited entry into the country. He hasn’t visited the countries listed in the immigration ban and he has worked at JPL — a major center at a US federal agency — for 10 years.
    http://www.theverge.com/2017/2/12/14...ump-travel-ban

  10. #1120

    Re: Let's Discuss Science

    Donald Trump Just Broadcast a Dangerous Misconception About Autism Rates
    By Jesse Singal February 14, 2017
    2:29 p.m.

    Those who advocate for sound, evidence-based research about autism are extremely alarmed about Donald Trump, and for good reason: In addition to Trump’s ties to Andrew Wakefield, the disgraced British doctor whose debunked research helped fuel the false idea of links between childhood vaccines and autism, Robert F. Kennedy Jr., a notorious anti-vaxxer himself, told reporters back in January that Trump planned to tap him as chair of a commission on “vaccine safety.” There is no question at this point that Trump has significant connections to a pseudoscientific medical movement that spreads dangerous, disproven ideas.

    Today, Trump gave nervous observers yet more reason to worry. It occurred at a White House event in which Trump and Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos met with a bunch of educators. Trump seemed to fixate, for a moment, on one educator named Jane (her last name is hard to make out) after she explained that she is the principal of a special education center in Virginia.

    After Jane noted that many of her students have autism, Trump asked, “Have you seen a big increase in the autism, with the children?” Jane replied in the affirmative, but seemed to couch her response as being more about an increase in demand for services — she didn’t explicitly agree there’s been a big increase in the overall rate. Trump continued: “So what’s going on with autism? When you look at the tremendous increase, it’s really — it’s such an incredible — it’s really a horrible thing to watch, the tremendous amount of increase. Do you have any idea? And you’re seeing it in the school?” Jane replied — again, in a way that seems a bit noncommittal vis-à-vis Trump’s claim — that the rate of autism is something like 1-in-66 or 1-in-68 children. To which Trump responds: “Well now, it’s gotta be even lower [presumably meaning higher, rate-wise] than that, which is just amazing — well, maybe we can do something.” (Jane had the rate right, and Trump is incorrect that it has crept higher.)

    Trump is broadcasting a very inaccurate and misleading claim about autism — one that you often hear from the Kennedys and Wakefields of the world, but which experts flatly disagree with. Purveyors of this claim often point out that autism rates have increased significantly since the early 1990s, but as Steve Silberman, an autism expert and the author of NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity, told Science of Us, that has to do with diagnostic criteria and awareness, not the prevalence of the condition itself.

    “There’s no consensus as to whether or not there’s been any significant increase in the actual prevalence of autism, period,” says Silberman. “The real debate is whether or not there has been a small increase, and there are a number of factors that could play a role in that small increase. For instance, it’s well established that older parents have more autistic kids and people are waiting longer to get married and have kids now, so there may be a small increase there. Some people claim that there are some environmental factors — notably, not vaccines — that may be contributing to a small increase. But the consensus is that there has been no huge, startling, ‘horrible,’ as Trump said, increase in autism. And the CDC estimate has been flat for a couple of years, just as they expected it to be, because the major source of the increase that started in the 1990s was broadened diagnostic criteria and much more public awareness of what autism looks like.”

    Part of what fuels the anti-vax movement is this misperception: If not too long ago autism wasn’t a “crisis” (advocates for autistic people are not fans of such phrasing, for understandable reasons), but today it is, then it makes sense to look for a scapegoat like vaccines. The data we have suggests this simply isn’t the case. Unfortunately, as Silberman pointed out, influential anti-vaxxers seem to have the ear of the president, and that could be contributing to his false beliefs about autism rates.

    It’s bad enough for the president to be trafficking in and helping to spread such dangerous pseudoscience, but Silberman said what’s doubly frustrating is the opportunity cost: Time and attention spent on what are in reality autism nonissues could suck up resources that might otherwise be directed at the many gaps the U.S. has in this area. As Silberman explained, there’s still a great deal public-health researchers don’t know about the adult autistic population in the U.S. “We don’t even know how many autistic adults are out there, trying to get by with no support, because a national prevalence survey of autism has never been done in the United States,” he said.

    Once many autistic people are done with high school, they lose access to many vital sources of support, in some cases rendering them effectively invisible.
    To Silberman, that’s the sort of thing the president of the United States should be focusing on — not bunk claims that we’re in the midst of some sort of scary autism “epidemic.” Unfortunately, the president doesn’t grant much credence to scientific consensus. “Trump tends to listen to people who he thinks are rogues, who are pushing against conventional wisdom, especially at the expense of so-called ‘experts,’” said Silberman. “And just as he does in so many areas of public life, Trump is listening to the wrong people and trusting the wrong people.”


    http://nymag.com/scienceofus/2017/02...ism-rates.html
    "For the person that we know in the daytime, we don't need to light a lamp to see his face at night." Ghanaian Proverb


  11. #1121

    Re: Let's Discuss Science

    There is no rock bottom for this buffoon. None.
    Starry starry night

  12. #1122

    Re: Let's Discuss Science

    Scientists have just detected a major change to the Earth’s oceans linked to a warming climate

    A large research synthesis, published in one of the world’s most influential scientific journals, has detected a decline in the amount of dissolved oxygen in oceans around the world — a long-predicted result of climate change that could have severe consequences for marine organisms if it continues.

    The paper, published Wednesday in the journal Nature by oceanographer Sunke Schmidtko and two colleagues from the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research in Kiel, Germany, found a decline of more than 2 percent in ocean oxygen content worldwide between 1960 and 2010. The loss, however, showed up in some ocean basins more than others. The largest overall volume of oxygen was lost in the largest ocean — the Pacific — but as a percentage, the decline was sharpest in the Arctic Ocean, a region facing Earth’s most stark climate change.

    The loss of ocean oxygen “has been assumed from models, and there have been lots of regional analysis that have shown local decline, but it has never been shown on the global scale, and never for the deep ocean,” said Schmidtko, who conducted the research with Lothar Stramma and Martin Visbeck, also of GEOMAR.

    Ocean oxygen is vital to marine organisms, but also very delicate — unlike in the atmosphere, where gases mix together thoroughly, in the ocean that is far harder to accomplish, Schmidtko explained. Moreover, he added, just 1 percent of all the Earth’s available oxygen mixes into the ocean; the vast majority remains in the air.

    Climate change models predict the oceans will lose oxygen because of several factors. Most obvious is simply that warmer water holds less dissolved gases, including oxygen. “It’s the same reason we keep our sparkling drinks pretty cold,” Schmidtko said.

    But another factor is the growing stratification of ocean waters. Oxygen enters the ocean at its surface, from the atmosphere and from the photosynthetic activity of marine microorganisms. But as that upper layer warms up, the oxygen-rich waters are less likely to mix down into cooler layers of the ocean because the warm waters are less dense and do not sink as readily.


    “When the upper ocean warms, less water gets down deep, and so therefore, the oxygen supply to the deep ocean is shut down or significantly reduced,” Schmidtko said.

    The new study represents a synthesis of literally “millions” of separate ocean measurements over time, according to GEOMAR. The authors then used interpolation techniques for areas of the ocean where they lacked measurements.

    The resulting study attributes less than 15 percent of the total oxygen loss to sheer warmer temperatures, which create less solubility. The rest was attributed to other factors, such as a lack of mixing.

    Matthew Long, an oceanographer from the National Center for Atmospheric Research who has published on ocean oxygen loss, said he considers the new results “robust” and a “major advance in synthesizing observations to examine oxygen trends on a global scale.”

    Long was not involved in the current work, but his research had previously demonstrated that ocean oxygen loss was expected to occur and that it should soon be possible to demonstrate that in the real world through measurements, despite the complexities involved in studying the global ocean and deducing trends about it.

    That’s just what the new study has done.

    “Natural variations have obscured our ability to definitively detect this signal in observations,” Long said in an email. “In this study, however, Schmidtko et al. synthesize all available observations to show a global-scale decline in oxygen that conforms to the patterns we expect from human-driven climate warming. They do not make a definitive attribution statement, but the data are consistent with and strongly suggestive of human-driven warming as a root cause of the oxygen decline.

    “It is alarming to see this signal begin to emerge clearly in the observational data,” he added.

    “Schmidtko and colleagues’ findings should ring yet more alarm bells about the consequences of global warming,” added Denis Gilbert, a researcher with the Maurice Lamontagne Institute at Fisheries and Oceans Canada in Quebec, in an accompanying commentary on the study also published in Nature.


    Because oxygen in the global ocean is not evenly distributed, the 2 percent overall decline means there is a much larger decline in some areas of the ocean than others.

    Moreover, the ocean already contains so-called oxygen minimum zones, generally found in the middle depths. The great fear is that their expansion upward, into habitats where fish and other organism thrive, will reduce the available habitat for marine organisms.

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    In shallower waters, meanwhile, the development of ocean “hypoxic” areas, or so-called “dead zones,” may also be influenced in part by declining oxygen content overall.

    On top of all of that, declining ocean oxygen can also worsen global warming in a feedback loop. In or near low oxygen areas of the oceans, microorganisms tend to produce nitrous oxide, a greenhouse gas, Gilbert writes. Thus the new study “implies that production rates and efflux to the atmosphere of nitrous oxide … will probably have increased.”

    The new study underscores once again that some of the most profound consequences of climate change are occurring in the oceans, rather than on land. In recent years, incursions of warm ocean water have caused large die-offs of coral reefs, and in some cases, kelp forests as well. Meanwhile, warmer oceans have also begun to destabilize glaciers in Greenland and Antarctica, and as they melt, these glaciers freshen the ocean waters and potentially change the nature of their circulation.

    When it comes to ocean deoxygenation, as climate change continues, this trend should also increase — studies suggest a loss of up to 7 percent of the ocean’s oxygen by 2100. At the end of the current paper, the researchers are blunt about the consequences of a continuing loss of oceanic oxygen.

    “Far-reaching implications for marine ecosystems and fisheries can be expected,” they write.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.5bc1cb86fb8c
    Meet again we do, old foe...

  13. #1123

    Re: Let's Discuss Science

    The new study underscores once again that some of the most profound consequences of climate change are occurring in the oceans, rather than on land. In recent years, incursions of warm ocean water have caused large die-offs of coral reefs, and in some cases, kelp forests as well. Meanwhile, warmer oceans have also begun to destabilize glaciers in Greenland and Antarctica, and as they melt, these glaciers freshen the ocean waters and potentially change the nature of their circulation.

    When it comes to ocean deoxygenation, as climate change continues, this trend should also increase — studies suggest a loss of up to 7 percent of the ocean’s oxygen by 2100. At the end of the current paper, the researchers are blunt about the consequences of a continuing loss of oceanic oxygen.

    “Far-reaching implications for marine ecosystems and fisheries can be expected,” they write.
    Come on man who are you going to believe? A bunch of heathen scientists or Billy Bob down the road? There's no such thing as climate change.

    Seriously thanks for this Drop.
    "For the person that we know in the daytime, we don't need to light a lamp to see his face at night." Ghanaian Proverb


  14. #1124
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    Re: Let's Discuss Science

    Quote Originally Posted by Drop-shot View Post
    Scientists have just detected a major change to the Earth’s oceans linked to a warming climate
    Warning: Reading the comments will destroy brain cells.
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  15. #1125

    Re: Let's Discuss Science

    Quote Originally Posted by dryrunguy View Post
    Warning: Reading the comments will destroy brain cells.
    I rarely venture into Trollsville. I can't stomach it.
    Meet again we do, old foe...

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