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Thread: In Memoriam

  1. #16
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    Re: "(name goes here) Has Passed" Thread

    Last Tango in Paris actress Maria Schneider dies

    French actress Maria Schneider, best known for playing Marlon Brando's lover in Last Tango in Paris, has died in Paris aged 58 after a long illness.

    The actress was 19 when she was cast opposite Brando in Bernardo Bertolucci's controversial 1972 film.

    It saw her play a young Parisian who embarks on a sexually charged relationship with his middle-aged American businessman.

    The film was banned in several countries due to its explicit content.

    Born in 1952 in Paris, Schneider was the daughter of French actor Daniel Gelin.

    She began her film career in uncredited roles before being given her first break in 1970 film Madly.

    Last Tango in Paris provoked such controversy that the actress resolved never to do nude scenes again.

    Yet she was briefly seen naked three years later in Jack Nicholson film The Passenger, albeit in long shot.

    Schneider battled drug addiction in the 1970s but went on to star in mostly low-budget European films.

    She was last seen on the big screen in 2008 French film Cliente, about a married construction worker who leads a double life as a gigolo.

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    Re: "(name goes here) Has Passed" Thread

    I saw an interview with Schneider once (I think it was on Tom Snyder's "Tomorrow" show, which was classic late night TV back in the day), where she basically spent the entire show ripping Brando and Bertolucci for the things she said they did to her during the filming of Last Tango. I don't know if she was mental/had drug problems before filming, but she made it sound like making the movie had scarred her for life.
    With Lucas Pouille at Indian Wells (2018)

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    Re: "(name goes here) Has Passed" Thread

    Guitarist Gary Moore Dies

    Rock guitarist and former Thin Lizzy star Gary Moore has died in Spain, British media reported on Sunday. The Belfast-born musician was 58.

    According to the Irish Times website, Moore was found dead in his hotel room in Estepona early in the morning. A postmortem was due to be carried out in the nearby city of Malaga, the newspaper added.

    A Foreign Office (Ministry) spokeswoman in London said: "We are aware (of Moore's death), and we stand ready to provide consular assistance. We are very sorry for his family's loss."

    Moore was just 16 years old when he moved from Belfast to Dublin in 1969 to join Skid Row, which featured Phil Lynott as lead singer.

    Moore was later brought into Irish rock band Thin Lizzy, best known for hit songs like "Whiskey in the Jar" and "The Boys Are Back in Town."

    He replaced the departing Eric Bell, who told the BBC: "I still can't believe it. He was so robust, he wasn't a rock casualty, he was a healthy guy. He was a superb player and a dedicated musician."

    As well as playing with Thin Lizzy for several periods, Moore worked separately with Lynott, who died in 1986 from drug-related complications.

    Moore also worked with a number of top artists, including George Harrison.

    ::::

    I'm a bit gutted by this. I loved Over the Hills and Far Away,


    Over the Hills



    but Still Got the Blues for You is my favourite. The guitar solo is amazing.


    RIP Gary

  4. #19

    Re: "(name goes here) Has Passed" Thread

    Thanks luvs. I'm afraid the only Gary Moore I knew hosted I've Got a Secret on TV a million years ago. This Gary Moore is incredible. There's a whole world of music out there I have yet to discover, and my TAT buddies keep introducing me to it.

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    Re: "(name goes here) Has Passed" Thread

    I still listen to Thin Lizzy on a regular basis. Everyone knows "The Boys Are Back In Town", and it is a great tune, but they have some other fantastic stuff from their years together..."Jailbreak", "Dancing In The Moonlight", "Cowboy Song".
    With Lucas Pouille at Indian Wells (2018)

  6. #21
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    Re: "(name goes here) Has Passed" Thread

    I'm not quite old enough for the Thin Lizzy stuff, but I love all his solo material. It was an ex-boyfriend who introduced me to him (and he was younger than me).

    If you can manage all 8+ minutes of this it'll be worth it.

    Guitar God

  7. #22
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    Re: "(name goes here) Has Passed" Thread

    Looks like Moose got this thread started just in time.
    Oh Grigor. You silly man.

  8. #23

    Re: "(name goes here) Has Passed" Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Kirkus View Post
    Looks like Moose got this thread started just in time.
    You're not kidding And I'm really surprised by Gary's passing...
    Coach Marion, at your service!

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    Re: "(name goes here) Has Passed" Thread

    Tura Satana, Actress With a Cult Following, Is Dead
    By DAVE ITZKOFF
    Published: February 7, 2011


    Tura Satana, an actress whose authoritative presence, exotic looks and buxom frame commanded the attention of viewers of Russ Meyer’s 1965 cult movie “Faster, Pussycat! Kill! Kill!,” died on Friday in Reno, Nev.

    The cause was believed to be heart failure, her longtime manager, Siouxzan Perry, said. She said Ms. Satana was 72, though other sources listed her birth date as July 10, 1935, which would have made her 75.

    Born Tura Luna Pascual Yamaguchi on the Japanese island of Hokkaido to a father of Japanese and Filipino descent and a mother who was Cheyenne Indian and Scots-Irish, Ms. Satana spent part of her childhood in the World War II Manzanar internment camp for Japanese-Americans in California before her family settled in Chicago.

    Her Asian background and appearance and the fact that her physique developed early led to frequent harassment and assaults, and she lived an itinerant life, working as an exotic dancer and nude model.

    After playing a supporting part in the 1963 Billy Wilder comedy “Irma la Douce,” Ms. Satana found her breakthrough role in “Faster, Pussycat! Kill! Kill!,” a Meyer exploitation film that, in stark opposition to the director’s later works, featured no nudity. In the film she played Varla, the leader of a gang of go-go dancers who kidnap a couple, murder the boy and force the girl to follow them on further lawless adventures.

    Ms. Satana’s portrayal of Varla as a brazenly violent but unapologetically feminine woman who frequently upbraids the men who dare to ogle her — when a gas-station attendant tells her he believes in “seeing America first,” Varla replies, “You won’t find it down there, Columbus!” — earned her a cult following that endured long after the drive-in era.

    During the 1960s, Ms. Satana appeared on television shows like “Burke’s Law” and “The Man from U.N.C.L.E.” She also acted in “The Doll Squad” and “The Astro-Zombies,” both by the B-movie director Ted V. Mikels. More recently, Ms. Satana was featured in the 2002 film “Mark of the Astro-Zombies,” also directed by Mr. Mikels.

    In recent decades, the influence of Ms. Satana’s no-nonsense attitude could be seen in pop-cultural artifacts ranging from “Xena, Warrior Princess” to Quentin Tarantino’s “Kill Bill” movies.

    Ms. Satana is survived by two daughters, Kalani and Jade, and two sisters, Pamela and Kim, Ms. Perry said.

    In an interview with The San Francisco Bay Guardian, Ms. Satana explained that her performance in “Faster, Pussycat! Kill! Kill!” was convincing because she was essentially playing herself.

    “I was getting rid of a lot of anger!” she said. “A lot of things when I was growing up and as young girl — that anger I kept inside of me all those years — I think I finally let it loose.”

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/07/movies/07satana.html

    I saw Faster Pussycat at a midnight show in Philly back in the 70s, and Tura was just something you never forgot seeing. Always was surprised she was not as legendary as Bettie Page.

    With Lucas Pouille at Indian Wells (2018)

  10. #25
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    Jane Russell has passed away

    http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/new...ll-dies-162533

    Jane Russell, whose voluptuous good looks won the attention of Howard Hughes and launched her on a movie career, has died. She was 89.

    Oh Grigor. You silly man.

  11. #26

    Re: In Memoriam

    Loved Jane Russell.

    Love the thread title change.


  12. #27
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    Re: In Memoriam

    I just found out that Ms. Russell lived here, in one of our neighboring towns.
    Oh Grigor. You silly man.

  13. #28

    Re: In Memoriam

    This loss makes me very sad.




    Reverend Peter J. Gomes, who oversaw Memorial Church for the past three and a half decades, died Monday evening after suffering a brain aneurysm and heart attack. He was 68.

    His death was announced in an e-mail to members of the Harvard-Radcliffe Christian Fellowship and confirmed by a staff member at the Harvard University Choir.

    Gomes was hospitalized at Massachusetts General Hospital this past December after suffering a stroke. He was later moved to Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital in Boston.

    Friends reported as recently as this January that Gomes was recovering and in good condition.

    They said that he hoped to return to Harvard and deliver the Easter sermon at Memorial Church.

    In 2009, Gomes received a pacemaker after stumbling as a result of dizziness during a speaking appearance at St. Lawrence University in New York.

    By all accounts, Gomes—who was the Plummer Professor of Christian Morals at the Harvard Divinity School—maintained a tremendous presence at Harvard as well as around the country.

    He taught the popular course Religion 1513: “History of Harvard and Its Presidents” and delivered prayers at the inaugurations of Presidents George H.W. Bush and Ronald Reagan.

    “He’s been a brilliant preacher and has carried the Memorial Church and the heart of the College for decades now,” Memorial Church Associate Minister and longtime friend Dorothy A. Austin said of Gomes in January.
    Gomes also served as an advocate for gay rights since he came out in 1991.

    He was a prolific author, writing New York Times bestsellers such as “The Good Book: Reading the Bible with Mind and Heart” and “Sermons: The Book of Wisdom for Daily Living”.

    http://www.thecrimson.com/article/20...er-gomes-dies/
    I loved that man.


  14. #29

    Re: In Memoriam

    More about Gomes from the New York Times:
    At Harvard, he was the Plummer Professor of Christian Morals at the School of Divinity and the Pusey Minister of Memorial Church, a nondenominational center of Christian life on campus. For decades, he was among the first and the last to address undergraduates, greeting arriving freshman with a sermon on hallowed traditions, and advising graduating seniors about the world beyond the sheltering Harvard Yard.

    Then in 1991, he appeared before an angry crowd of students, faculty members and administrators protesting homophobic articles in a conservative campus magazine whose distribution had led to a spate of harassment and slurs against gay men and lesbians on campus. Mr. Gomes, putting his reputation and career on the line, announced that he was “a Christian who happens as well to be gay.”

    When the cheers faded, there were expressions of surprise from the Establishment, and a few calls for his resignation, which were ignored. The announcement changed little in Mr. Gomes’s private life; he had never married and said he was celibate by choice. But it was a major turning point for him professionally.

    “I now have an unambiguous vocation — a mission — to address the religious causes and roots of homophobia,” he told The Washington Post months later. “I will devote the rest of my life to addressing the ‘religious case’ against gays.”

    He was true to his word. His sermons and lectures, always well-attended, were packed in Cambridge and around the country as he embarked on a campaign to rebut literal and fundamentalist interpretations of the Bible. He also wrote extensively on intolerance.

    “Religious fundamentalism is dangerous because it cannot accept ambiguity and diversity and is therefore inherently intolerant,” he declared in an Op-Ed article for The New York Times in 1992. “Such intolerance, in the name of virtue, is ruthless and uses political power to destroy what it cannot convert.”

    In his 1996 best-seller, “The Good Book: Reading the Bible with Mind and Heart,” Mr. Gomes urged believers to grasp the spirit, not the letter, of scriptural passages that he said had been misused to defend racism, anti-Semitism and sexism and to attack homosexuality and abortion. He offered interpretations that he said transcended the narrow context of modern prejudices.

    “The Bible alone is the most dangerous thing I can think of,” he told The Los Angeles Times. “You need an ongoing context and a community of interpretation to keep the Bible current and to keep yourself honest. Forget the thought that the Bible is an absolute pronouncement.”

    But Mr. Gomes also defended the Bible from critics on the left who called it corrupt because passages had been used to oppress people. “The Bible isn’t a single book, it isn’t a single historical or philosophical or theological treatise,” he told The Seattle Gay News in 1996. “It has 66 books in it. It is a library.”
    I suppose the above could be cross-posted to the religion thread but I put it here because it is a tribute to the man's intellectual acuity and overall integrity.


  15. #30
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    Re: In Memoriam

    I don't know how much this qualifies, but Frank Buckles, the last living US veteran of WWI, died Sunday at the age of 110.

    The only remaining known WWI mobilized people worldwide are an Australian man who is 109 and a British woman at 110.

    I find this sort of sad... the end of a living memory of a major event (at least from a certain perspective, but how much longer will it take for it to be totally gone given the ages we are talking about).
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