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  1. #8461

    Re: World News Random, Random

    Natasha Bertrand
    ‏Verified account
    @NatashaBertrand

    BREAKING: A grand jury in the Eastern District of Virginia has returned an 18-count superseding indictment against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, DOJ officials tell us. He's been charged with violating the Espionage Act. Story TK.
    "Even if you dance for your enemy on the rock, he will accuse you of splashing water on him." ~ African Proverb




  2. #8462

    Re: World News Random, Random

    Adam Klasfeld
    ‏Verified account
    @KlasfeldReports

    To be absolutely clear:

    There is nothing in Assange’s new indictment that hasn’t been publicly known for at least half a decade, if not longer.

    To support it, based on this indictment, means endorsing the prosecutorial discretion of the Trump DOJ over the Obama DOJ.

    From December 2011 to August 2013, I covered the Manning court-martial exhaustively in a military court.

    My analysis of Assange's new indictment: Trump DOJ put Manning military records from Obama's DOD in a microwave and, unlike Obama's DOJ, said "Go" on Espionage Act charges.

    I covered the Manning court-martial from gavel-to-gavel in a small courthouse in Ft. Meade, Md.

    On a quick skim, there's nothing in this indictment that seems new or surprising. Just aged, reheated military records that the Obama DOJ let gather dust in a new Trumpian package.
    "Even if you dance for your enemy on the rock, he will accuse you of splashing water on him." ~ African Proverb




  3. #8463

    Re: World News Random, Random

    Theresa May will resign.
    She will go down in history as a cautionary tale. I don't know if to think "good riddance" or feel bad for her.
    What are the chances that Boris Johnson will become PM? I know, people will say that is impossible. Which was the same thing said about Brexit passing.
    Time for the UK to be ruled again by the Crown. It could not be worse.
    Starry starry night

  4. #8464

    Re: World News Random, Random

    I read this just before 1a Eastern this morning.

    Without true friends or allies, Theresa May’s downfall was inevitable
    Simon Jenkins
    Thu 23 May 2019 19.29 BST

    The prime minister’s failure to embrace pragmatism sealed her fate. Her successor will have to deploy very different skills

    All political careers end in failure. Not all end in a punishment beating. The apparently imminent departure of Theresa May as Tory leader has seen a brutality rare even for the British Conservative party.

    She was crowned with acclaim in 2016, and set the task of honouring the result of the Brexit referendum. In the 2017 election, she won almost as high a share of the popular vote as Margaret Thatcher or Tony Blair ever did, a fact converted into failure by Britain’s first-past-the-post electoral system.

    She fought to steer a necessary Brexit compromise through a divided Commons. Her party’s response to her efforts should be an awful warning to whoever succeeds her. Panicked by Brexit and riven by ambition, the Tories junked their most valued political weapon, loyalty to the leader. They rubbished her.

    Rarely does politics turn on personal failings, but May’s have been her undoing. British politics, Alexis de Tocqueville noted, mimics the club not the mob. Sensible leaders form retinues, protective packs. May’s inability to make friends or court allies deprived her of the natural support she needed in her tortuous enterprise. She seemed wooden and inflexible, even in seeking the compromises she so desperately needed.


    May’s only club has been her husband, Philip. She was otherwise alone, and by this week seemed eerily bereft of kindly advice. Being bundled out of office by erstwhile supporters is peculiarly painful.
    It was so for Thatcher and Heath, and even for Macmillan and Eden before them. For the Tories, leadership recalls that of the Roman empire, determined by coronation tempered by assassination. It is the epitome of men behaving badly. Nothing has changed since it went over from choice by cabal to election by MPs in the 1960s, and then by party members in 1998. All that can be said is that there is probably no better way.

    Labour finds it much harder to get rid of unsatisfactory leaders, but both systems are preferable to America’s constitutional fixed terms, with removal dependent on impeachment. It is better, when political accidents happen, for the captain to be ditched and the voyage to resume with most of the crew still in place.


    More important, May’s departure will make no difference to the realities of the Brexit saga. However inept the messenger, the message remains the same. Some version of May’s present deal is inevitable if economic relations with the EU are not to go over the cliff. The next Tory leader will still have to forge a compromise capable of passing the House of Commons. The two sides of a divided political community have to be brought together.

    A customs union and single market, however tentatively described, are clearly in the nation’s trading and therefore economic interest. If the polls are any guide, they are also the nation’s wish. A customs barrier, whether “virtual” or otherwise, round an offshore island and through the Irish countryside would benefit no one but bureaucrats and police officers. The same goes for a ban on migrants.

    The Brexiters’ thesis that some trading El Dorado awaits Britain “in the rest of the world” is mendacious cynicism. The nation is not nearly as divided on this as hard Brexit’s champions like to maintain. May’s transitional compromise may yet come to be regarded as her most durable achievement if only because, as Thatcher would say, there is no real alternative.

    This week’s European elections are a complete red herring. The likely victory of the Brexit party will not signify a collapse in support for Britain’s two main governing parties. These elections are not for a government. They are an answer to a stupid question, asked incessantly by Nigel Farage: do you approve of how the big parties have handled Brexit? It would take a strong stomach for anyone to go to the polling station and put a cross against that.

    For the past two years, the House of Commons has reached one clear decision. It has voted overwhelmingly against leaving the EU without a deal on customs and borders. Whoever leads the Tories – be it Boris Johnson, Jeremy Hunt, Michael Gove or anyone else – will have to take this as given. They will have to negotiate a Brexit deal with Brussels and fast, and that deal will have to be a version of the one that the Commons has three, if not four, times rejected.

    At this point, May’s failings come into focus. Machiavellian doctrine ordains that power may be gained by principle, but it is retained by pragmatism. The arts used to win power are not those for keeping it. The political scientist David Runciman reminds us that, while hypocrisy may be a failing in ethics, in politics it borders on a necessity.

    To secure Brexit, candidates for the Tory leadership will need the hypocrisy of a Disraeli or a (peacetime) Churchill. They must be ready to rat on their principles, turn against friends, deceive the media, and do so with populist panache. Somehow, May’s plan B must be recast to mobilise a soft-Brexit coalition across the Commons. The backwoods hardliners must be bribed or isolated. If all this sounds right up Johnson’s street, he may yet be soft Brexit’s best bet. As Runciman notes, the essence of a Disraeli is not to rat on your principles but to have none in the first place.

    One guardian of this process remains in place. The Commons must accept that if compromise cannot be found, it will have failed to honour its 2016 bargain with the electorate. That must require a new mandate, either through another referendum, or through returning to square one, revoking article 50 and a general election.

    As for Johnson, he can be left to the tender mercies of the Conservative party. It is good at devouring its own.

    https://www.theguardian.com/commenti...dership-brexit
    "Even if you dance for your enemy on the rock, he will accuse you of splashing water on him." ~ African Proverb




  5. #8465
    Everyday Warrior MJ2004's Avatar
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    Re: World News Random, Random

    She took the role when nobody else would. She was set up to fail from the start. History should be more lenient on her than her predecessor.

  6. #8466

    Re: World News Random, Random

    I hope they elect Boris Johnson. He'd be great at this stage of the process.
    Roger forever

  7. #8467

    Re: World News Random, Random

    An English speaking lunatic on the West North Atlantic, an English speaking lunatic in the East North Atlantic.
    What could go wrong?
    Starry starry night

  8. #8468

    Re: World News Random, Random

    Brexit is Johnson's brainchild. He should've been the one shepherding it in the first place. It's obvious they never thought about Northern Ireland and as the columnist in the Guardian says the pipe dream of them being able to find trading partners in the rest of the world is just that.

    I almost feel sorry for Mrs. May. She wanted the job and she got it. Always be careful what you ask for.
    "Even if you dance for your enemy on the rock, he will accuse you of splashing water on him." ~ African Proverb




  9. #8469

    Re: World News Random, Random

    I don't exactly feel bad for May, but others should've been getting blasted way more often and strongly than she has, but it's not happening. It's kind of like Martha Stewart. I don't feel bad for her, why are you doing illegal nonsense to save a relatively small amount of money when you're already rich and can take the hit? But there were so many more egregious white collar goings on by others that were never prosecuted and it was like WTF?!? She should've never been the poster child for any of it and yet she was made into that. That's how this feels to me, Theresa May became a poster child for something she was nowhere near the worst part of. Maybe it feels differently in the UK, but on a world perspective, David Cameron feels like he's completely skated. And the Brexit people have seemingly been shielded by May at the ridiculousness of their ill-thought out plan and how they sold a false bill of goods to the people. Will her resignation mean those who are truly at fault will finally be brought to task in public? One would hope, but not at all sure that'll happen.
    Last edited by JazzNU; Yesterday at 09:28 AM.

  10. #8470

    Re: World News Random, Random

    It has been a looooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooong time since those at fault have been brought to task in public.
    Starry starry night

  11. #8471
    Forum Director
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    Re: World News Random, Random

    Meanwhile... And if the first question you asked, like me, was "How did this happen?", see the excerpted paragraph below.

    Nearly 500 Children Have Been Infected With HIV in a Single Pakistani City. Here's What to Know

    Excerpt:

    How did so many people get infected with HIV?

    A web of unsanitary and unsafe medical practices seems to be to blame, according to local officials.

    Many of the children who originally tested positive for HIV had been treated in a Larkana clinic run by Dr. Muzaffar Ghangharo, NPR reports. After demands from parents, Ghangharo was eventually tested for HIV. The results came back positive, “and here is when it was suspected that he was the source of spreading HIV in their kids through bad practices,” a district police officer told NPR.

    Ghangharo was arrested on suspicion of intentionally infecting his patients with HIV, the BBC reports. Pakistan’s SAMAA TV reported Thursday that he was cleared of that charge, but found guilty of “criminal medical negligence.” Ghangharo denied the original accusations in a video filmed in jail.

    Officials have pointed to medical negligence across the local health care system as a likely cause of the outbreak. Many local officials have blamed “quacks,” in apparent reference to the large number of unqualified individuals who practice medicine in the area.

    “Possible causes included clinics run by quacks, use of a single syringe for multiple patients, and use of the same drip set for multiple patients,” Siddique wrote in his op-ed. He added that at least 61 unsafe clinics have been “sealed” and 29 more health care centers warned in the wake of the outbreak.

    Sindh health officials also suggested that barbershops, where razor blades are sometimes reused, could be a possible transmission source, NPR reports. Siddique also pointed to unsafe circumcisions, which sometimes take place in barbershops, in his op-ed.

    This is not the first time Larkana’s medical system has been at the center of an HIV outbreak. An outbreak among dialysis patients, which infected about 50 people, was reported in 2016. Years earlier, there was also an outbreak among intravenous drug users in Larkana.

  12. #8472

    Re: World News Random, Random

    Quote Originally Posted by dryrunguy View Post
    Meanwhile... And if the first question you asked, like me, was "How did this happen?", see the excerpted paragraph below.

    Nearly 500 Children Have Been Infected With HIV in a Single Pakistani City. Here's What to Know

    Excerpt:

    How did so many people get infected with HIV?

    A web of unsanitary and unsafe medical practices seems to be to blame, according to local officials.

    Many of the children who originally tested positive for HIV had been treated in a Larkana clinic run by Dr. Muzaffar Ghangharo, NPR reports. After demands from parents, Ghangharo was eventually tested for HIV. The results came back positive, “and here is when it was suspected that he was the source of spreading HIV in their kids through bad practices,” a district police officer told NPR.

    Ghangharo was arrested on suspicion of intentionally infecting his patients with HIV, the BBC reports. Pakistan’s SAMAA TV reported Thursday that he was cleared of that charge, but found guilty of “criminal medical negligence.” Ghangharo denied the original accusations in a video filmed in jail.

    Officials have pointed to medical negligence across the local health care system as a likely cause of the outbreak. Many local officials have blamed “quacks,” in apparent reference to the large number of unqualified individuals who practice medicine in the area.

    “Possible causes included clinics run by quacks, use of a single syringe for multiple patients, and use of the same drip set for multiple patients,” Siddique wrote in his op-ed. He added that at least 61 unsafe clinics have been “sealed” and 29 more health care centers warned in the wake of the outbreak.

    Sindh health officials also suggested that barbershops, where razor blades are sometimes reused, could be a possible transmission source, NPR reports. Siddique also pointed to unsafe circumcisions, which sometimes take place in barbershops, in his op-ed.

    This is not the first time Larkana’s medical system has been at the center of an HIV outbreak. An outbreak among dialysis patients, which infected about 50 people, was reported in 2016. Years earlier, there was also an outbreak among intravenous drug users in Larkana.
    Is their gen-pop like gen-pop in the US because...
    "Even if you dance for your enemy on the rock, he will accuse you of splashing water on him." ~ African Proverb




  13. #8473

    Re: World News Random, Random

    Quote Originally Posted by ponchi101 View Post
    An English speaking lunatic on the West North Atlantic, an English speaking lunatic in the East North Atlantic.
    What could go wrong?
    Given the way that both Donald Trump and Boris Johnson speak I think it's a bit of stretch to say they speak English.

  14. #8474

    Re: World News Random, Random

    Geri the Gerbil
    ‏@GHNeale

    This is the video that Eddie Mair refers to when talking about the odious Boris Johnson. Do share x pic.twitter.com/Hqjs9mtXTz


    Be best!
    "Even if you dance for your enemy on the rock, he will accuse you of splashing water on him." ~ African Proverb




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