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  1. #8011

    Re: World News Random, Random

    Quote Originally Posted by the Moz View Post
    I don't see how Theresa May can survive a confidence vote after the Commons so heavily defeated her Brexit deal.
    It's the opposite. She is very likely to survive anyway because there is no challenger from a Tory side and conservatives are unlikely to vote for the Labor.
    Roger forever

  2. #8012

    Re: World News Random, Random

    I don't think she'll be exactly thrilled to win a confidence vote tomorrow

    If she does hold on there's homework for the weekend. She has to table a Plan B by the start of next week.

    Why did May ever want this job? Divorcing the UK from the EU. What a thankless task.
    25 GRAND SLAM TITLES: 5 SINGLES 13 DOUBLES 7 MIXED

  3. #8013

    Re: World News Random, Random

    Quote Originally Posted by the Moz View Post
    I don't think she'll be exactly thrilled to win a confidence vote tomorrow

    If she does hold on there's homework for the weekend. She has to table a Plan B by the start of next week.

    Why did May ever want this job? Divorcing the UK from the EU. What a thankless task.
    She's aged 20 years over the last two years. Meanwhile the instigators and perpetrators of this con are sitting on the sidelines watching the show.
    "Even if you dance for your enemy on the rock, he will accuse you of splashing water on him." ~ African Proverb




  4. #8014

    Re: World News Random, Random

    U.S. confirms American troops killed in blast claimed by Islamic State in Syria

    By Louisa Loveluck January 16 at 12:30 PM

    BEIRUT — The Islamic State asserted responsibility Wednesday for a suicide blast in the U.S.-patrolled Syrian city of Manbij, the first such attack since President Trump said American forces would withdraw from the country because the militant group has been largely defeated.

    A spokesman for the U.S.-led coalition battling the Islamic State said that U.S. service members were killed while conducting a routine patrol in the city but did not say how many died or provide further details.

    U.S. officials told The Post that initial reports suggested four Americans may have died. In addition, at least three Americans are believed to have been wounded, one of them critically, according to a person familiar with the situation who spoke on the condition of anonymity about the still-evolving conditions on the ground.

    The Islamic State’s unofficial news agency, Amaq, said the attacker used an explosives-laden vest to target coalition forces and that nine American troops were killed or injured. Amaq presented no evidence for that claim.

    The White House said in a statement Wednesday that Trump has been “fully briefed” on the Manbij attack and that officials would continue to monitor the situation.

    Vice President Pence, speaking at the State Department several hours after the U.S. casualty reports, did not mention the bombing or the deaths, but instead hailed Trump’s leadership in combatting the militants in Syria.

    “We are bringing our troops home,” Pence said in an address to 180 U.S. ambassadors and chiefs of missions abroad gathered for a conference in Washington. “The caliphate has crumbled, and ISIS has been defeated.”


    Surveillance camera video, apparently from the site of the attack, showed the explosion erupting on a busy sidewalk, sending a child running from the flames with hands clasped over his ears. Bodies and blood trails could be seen spread across the ground in photographs from the immediate aftermath.

    The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said at least 19 people were wounded or killed. A Kurdish news agency reported that at least 10 people were injured in the attack, which it said occurred outside a popular restaurant.

    Trump announced last month that about 2,000 U.S. military personnel would be leaving Syria, almost four years after they intervened as part of an international coalition to dislodge the Islamic State from its self-declared “caliphate” straddling Syria and Iraq.

    The president’s declaration surprised allies and foes alike, drawing consternation from international partners and accusations of abandonment from a U.S.-backed Kurdish force that has suffered thousands of casualties during the military campaign.

    In public pronouncements, Trump initially justified the decision by saying that the Islamic State had been defeated. Advisers then launched a weeks-long lobbying effort in an attempt to get Trump to change his mind or slow the withdrawal, and defense officials have reminded the president that the Islamic State continues to wage stiff resistance in eastern Syria, while maintaining the ability to launch strikes elsewhere in the country.

    The U.S. military announced Friday that it has begun withdrawing equipment from Syria but declined to provide details, leaving it unclear whether any materiel has been pulled out of the Manbij area. Pentagon officials said then that initial withdrawals would be limited to equipment and that no troops had yet departed.

    The drawdown is widely seen as likely to spark battles for control of areas vacated by the Americans, but there was no immediate indication of any link between the withdrawal plan and Wednesday’s attack in Manbij.

    Zakaria Zakaria in Istanbul and Karen DeYoung, Carol Morello, Missy Ryan, John Wagner and William Branigin in Washington contributed to this report.


    https://www.washingtonpost.com/world...=.b7f148a86266
    "Even if you dance for your enemy on the rock, he will accuse you of splashing water on him." ~ African Proverb




  5. #8015

    Re: World News Random, Random

    Theresa May survives confidence vote, even after Brexit failure

    By William Booth and Karla Adam January 16 at 2:16 PM

    LONDON — A day after the crushing defeat of Prime Minister Theresa May’s Brexit plan, members of Parliament took up a no-confidence motion, insulting and disparaging her for hours and hours on Wednesday.

    Yet she survived, by a vote of 325 to 306.

    Normally, a British prime minister who a day earlier had lost a vote on her top legislation by such a margin — 432 to 202, the worst parliamentary loss in a century — might be expected to resign or be swept away. But these are not normal times.

    Brexit is tearing British society and its political classes apart, as the sides devolve into warring tribes of Leavers and Remainers, neither with enough power to best the other.

    “I think it’s astonishing she is carrying on as prime minister,” said Jonathan Tonge, a politics professor at the University of Liverpool. “Not just because of the size of the defeat, but also because she told us that this was the ‘best and only deal.’ So, by definition, any course she pursues now is an inferior course.”

    Tim Bale, a politics professor at Queen Mary University of London, said May is still standing, in part, because no one else in her party wants to take over at the Brexit helm.

    “Who else is there? Who wants to take on this role?” Bale said. “No hard Brexiteer wants to, because they know, in their heart of hearts, it can’t be done and they don’t want to be blamed for it. And anyone else would have to come from a soft Brexit perspective and would end up splitting the party.”

    Although a third of May’s Conservative Party members voted against her 585-page withdrawal agreement, negotiated with European leaders over two years, and even though her party challenged her leadership in a confidence vote just last month, Conservatives supported her Wednesday. Besides not having an obvious leader waiting in the wings, the Tories do not want a general election against the opposition Labour Party, led by Jeremy Corbyn, who called for the no-confidence vote.

    She will have until Monday to return to Parliament and present her Plan B.


    Still, the political theater of the no-confidence debate Wednesday, which began at midday and will end with a vote in the early evening, produced a withering day of rhetoric against May and her Brexit plan.

    Corbyn set the tone for the debate when he said that May was running “a zombie government,” raising the specter of the undead prime minister repeating over and over again that “Brexit means Brexit” while devouring the brains of her party.

    “Brexit is like a black hole that devours all light,” Labour’s Angela Eagle said.

    Phillip Lee, a Conservative Party member who resigned as a minister because he opposed May’s deal, asked the prime minister whether she accepts that she may now have to change her mind about her approach to Brexit.

    May did not say yes, but she did not say no.

    Eagle said May is offering nothing new — just repeating the stock phrases she has been using for months.

    Stewart McDonald of the Scottish National Party asked May which of her red lines she is willing to give up.

    The prime minister was asked repeatedly what she will do to improve her deal and win support from the divided Parliament.

    May replied that she will now consult with “parliamentarians across this House” to craft a better plan.

    But which members of Parliament?

    Sir Vince Cable, the leader of the Liberal Democrats party, applauded May’s offer of cross-party talks. But he warned the prime minister she should not “even lift up the phone” unless she is willing to rule out a no-deal Brexit, which she has not done.

    Cable also said he wanted to have a “constructive conversation” about the possibility of a second referendum on Brexit, a “people’s vote,” which he endorses. May said again Wednesday that she would not support a second vote.

    Nicola Sturgeon, leader of the Scottish National Party, told the BBC that she spoke with May after the defeat of her Brexit bill. Sturgeon said, “To be perfectly frank, I didn’t glean very much — she was at pains to tell me she wanted to sit down with other parties and listen to other ideas. But I got the very strong sense she does not have a clear idea herself of what the next steps are, and it doesn't seem to me as if she is prepared to abandon or move any of her red lines to open space for new approaches to be brought forward.”

    Sturgeon added, “It sounded like what she wanted to do was find a minor variation of her current deal — the one that was so overwhelmingly rejected last night.”

    May did not appear to have spoken with Corbyn or other Labour leaders.

    John McDonnell, Labour’s shadow chancellor, said that over the past two years, May “never picked up the phone.”

    “We thought at least last night, having been defeated so badly, she’d learned the lesson and would start that conversation — she’s not,” McDonnell said.

    Andrea Leadsom of the Conservative Party told BBC on Wednesday morning that May would try to achieve consensus by talking to “senior parliamentarians,” but seemed to suggest that this wouldn’t include Corbyn.

    Labour leader Yvette Cooper tweeted that it was “ludicrous and unworkable” to try to move forward without talking with Corbyn.” The prime minister “has to accept she failed by 230 votes — she can’t just keep digging in,” she said.

    Said Tonge: “We are in the biggest crisis since WWII — unless you reach across the divide and try and jump across the trenches, then we’re going to stay in a mess.”

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/world...=.08dfee9bdd59
    "Even if you dance for your enemy on the rock, he will accuse you of splashing water on him." ~ African Proverb




  6. #8016

    Re: World News Random, Random

    At times like this, one simple solution usually works: find and enemy, and blame him/them.
    May could (should?) blame the Brexit campaign on Russia. She can then stall while she claims that an investigation is being held on what did Putin do. Then, ask the empire to join against this enemy. Rally the patriotism.
    Might not be true but it might work. Unite the country through the oldest trick: blame somebody from the outside.
    Starry starry night

  7. #8017

    Re: World News Random, Random

    Quote Originally Posted by ponchi101 View Post
    At times like this, one simple solution usually works: find and enemy, and blame him/them.
    May could (should?) blame the Brexit campaign on Russia. She can then stall while she claims that an investigation is being held on what did Putin do. Then, ask the empire to join against this enemy. Rally the patriotism.
    Might not be true but it might work. Unite the country through the oldest trick: blame somebody from the outside.
    The problem is that there is gathering evidence that it is true, and that it would implicate a number of prominent members of the Leave campaign, and member of the Conservative party. If May were to use this and investigate it might well cost her her leadership as members of the party move to protect themselves from investigation and prosecution.

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