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  1. #9001

    Re: World News Random, Random

    BBC Breaking News
    @BBCBreaking

    Conservatives set to win majority in UK general election, according to exit poll for BBC, ITV and Sky

    #BBCElection https://bbc.in/2sjT4Wk



  2. #9002

    Re: World News Random, Random

    That's a huge win for Boris. He should now be able to get through any type of Brexit he desires.
    Roger forever

  3. #9003

    Re: World News Random, Random

    The SNP controls almost all of Scotland's parliamentary seats (if I understand the total number of seats that Scotland has overall, but I could easily be wrong). Even if Boris gets his vision of Brexit through, it certainly signifies more stormy times in the United Kingdom internally.
    "And for my next fearless prediction..."

  4. #9004

    Re: World News Random, Random

    Binyamin Appelbaum @BCAppelbaum

    So the U.S. and China have both agreed to announce a "trade deal," which so far as I can tell consists entirely of both sides repeatedly saying the words "trade deal."

    After two years of negotiations with China, we've arrived at a situation that is materially worse than the status quo ante. Congratulations everyone. Take the weekend.
    There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life.”

    ― Frank Zappa





  5. #9005

    Re: World News Random, Random

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff in TX View Post
    The SNP controls almost all of Scotland's parliamentary seats (if I understand the total number of seats that Scotland has overall, but I could easily be wrong). Even if Boris gets his vision of Brexit through, it certainly signifies more stormy times in the United Kingdom internally.
    Do you think not only Scotland but Ireland will split off as well?
    There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life.”

    ― Frank Zappa





  6. #9006

    Re: World News Random, Random

    Quote Originally Posted by Ti-Amie View Post
    Do you think not only Scotland but Ireland will split off as well?
    Some of the things I have read suggested N. Ireland will face heavy pressure to want to unite with the Republic of Ireland but those analysis also suggest that there would be a heavy economic burden on Ireland if that were to occur. It also seems hard to believe that after so many years of violence during "The Troubles" that there has been enough healing for that to occur. That being said, I am definitely not familiar enough to see how the Irish situation will be resolved to much satisfaction on anyone's part.

    How does TAT's collective wisdom from people living in the UK or frequent travelers perceive the situation? I would be interested in your thoughts.
    "And for my next fearless prediction..."

  7. #9007

    Re: World News Random, Random

    I am very pessimistic that N. Ireland could unite smoothly with the Republic of Ireland. Not only am I basing that on the issue about the duration and severity of the Troubles as in Jeff's note, bit also on a personal story. Several years ago (about 7 years), a friend and I spent a full day wandering around in and visiting museums and other sights in the neighborhoods on both sides of the Peace Wall in Belfast. The wall is still very much there but has breaks in it for easy passage between the 2 sides. The wall separated the most violent Catholic and Protestant neighborhoods as an attempt to keep people then from killing so many of each other.

    Anyway, when we were on the Protestant side, we went into a Visitors' Center/museum where a picture was presented that suggested that all is currently at peace and everyone is delighted with the current situation. The Catholic side didn't feel the same at all. But by far the most interesting part of the day was lunch. We ate a late lunch in a small sandwich bar in a side alley. We were alone in the shop with the owner/cook, so I decided to ask some pointed questions.

    His opinion was that the situation looked peaceful but that ill feelings were still simmering barely under the surface and that profound unrest and even violence would return if any provoking incident were to occur. He made it clear that most Catholics were not at al pleased with the results of the compromises, which they saw as almost totally giving the Protestants what they wanted.

    So a union with the Republic would make those Protestants a smallish minority. I can't imagine that would be well-tolerated. The tables would be suddenly turned on them.

    We also spent a day touring similar sites in Derry, which is one of the most Catholic places in the country. While we also heard that people are not as satisified as the Protestants would have you believe, we didn't have a similarly definitive experience to the one in that sandwich shop.

    I do believe that a lot of the people have put it all pretty much behind them, but for various reasons, there are plenty of people who still feel they have "axes to grind." It has probably helped the peace process that the border between the 2 Irelands has been so open. So it might be possible for re-unification to go smoothly, but there will be reason for major nail-biting if they try it.

    GH

  8. #9008

    Re: World News Random, Random

    I was reading something the other day where Sinn Fein under Gerry Adams was brought up in passing while discussing violence.

    Can NI split off on its own?
    There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life.”

    ― Frank Zappa





  9. #9009

    Re: World News Random, Random

    Mystery Solvent
    @MysterySolvent
    OMG!! Epic Trump trolling by @VicenteFoxQue
    !! I love it so hard!! ��������

    https://twitter.com/i/status/1205640246018396163
    There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life.”

    ― Frank Zappa





  10. #9010

    Re: World News Random, Random

    Quote Originally Posted by Ti-Amie View Post
    I was reading something the other day where Sinn Fein under Gerry Adams was brought up in passing while discussing violence.

    Can NI split off on its own?
    yes.
    25 GRAND SLAM TITLES: 5 SINGLES 13 DOUBLES 7 MIXED

  11. #9011

    Re: World News Random, Random

    Andy Burnham warns northerners to be wary of 'glib' Tory promises
    Manchester mayor says infrastructure commitments are easy pledges but decades off

    Helen Pidd North of England editor
    Sun 15 Dec 2019 17.02 GMT

    Andy Burnham, the mayor of Greater Manchester, has urged new Tory voters in the north of England to be wary of Conservative promises to invest tens of billions in the region’s infrastructure.

    Small print in the Conservative manifesto allowed for up to £100bn in additional capital spending over the next five years, £78bn of which has not yet been allocated. To date, £22bn has been earmarked for specific projects, such as £500m to reopen old train lines, £2.2bn on a public sector decarbonisation scheme, £4bn on flood defences and £2bn on potholes.

    An unnamed “senior Tory” told the Sunday Times that the remaining money needs to “show the voters in the red wall seats that they have something to show for voting Conservative”. The new MPs already have an extensive shopping list of demands they promised to voters during the campaign, including rail links to remote ports, new nuclear reactors and train stations.

    Speaking in Tony Blair’s former constituency of Sedgefield in County Durham on Saturday, Boris Johnson promised to “level up” the UK by “investing in better infrastructure, better education and fantastic modern technology” across the country.


    He will be under pressure from northern businesses and civic leaders to spend over half of the money – £39bn – on Northern Powerhouse Rail, a new TransPennine rail link from Liverpool to Hull which doesn’t have stops in many Conservative constituencies.

    Burnham welcomed Johnson’s sentiment but said such promises were easier to make than deliver.

    “If there is a positive to take from last week, and it’s a big if, perhaps it’s that the political classes are finally addressing the issues the north has long suffered from,” he said.

    “But I would warn people to be wary of glib commitments around infrastructure because they are decades off. And sometimes these are easy pledges for politicians to make but they never come true because they are beyond the political cycle.

    “The issue is people’s lives in the here and now. Clearly the north needs infrastructure but that doesn’t tick the box for the north, which is the way the Westminster world is portraying it now.”

    Burnham said he would like the government to commit funds now to reduce homelessness and to subsidise bus services so they are as cheap as in London. Each month he donates 15% of his own salary – £1,375 – to try to cut rough sleeping in Greater Manchester, and his Bed Every Night scheme was part-funded by more than £300,000 from then Manchester City player Vincent Kompany.

    The army of new Tory MPs in the north of England have already started to demand investment in their patches. “As a newly elected member for the north-west of England I am going to be fighting very, very hard to get funding here. We need rail infrastructure, we need road infrastructure,” Andy Carter, the new MP for Warrington South, told the BBC’s Sunday Politics North West show.

    Many new parliamentarians seem to believe in growing public spending rather than reducing it, reversing the party’s dedication to austerity over the past decade. James Daly, who won Bury North from Labour by just 105 votes, said he wanted “more money for public services, more money into our brilliant schools, more money into NHS services and more police on our streets”.

    Mark Jenkinson, who won the west Cumbrian seat of Workington, wants the government to build small new nuclear reactors in the region and has promised to lobby for better road and rail links to the ports in Workington and Silloth.

    Ian Levy, whose win in the Northumberland seat of Blyth Valley gave the first indication on election night that the “red wall” was crumbling, wants the return of passenger rail services to the constituency.

    Graham Stringer, the Labour MP for Blackley and Broughton in Greater Manchester, warned that an increase in Conservative MPs in the north wouldn’t necessarily equal more investment. “We had more Tories in the north of England in the 1980s and that’s when our infrastructure was seriously damaged,” he told the BBC.

    Transport for the North, the statutory body which advises government on transport in the region, wants the government to fund its £70bn plan to upgrade road and rail connections, including £39bn for Northern Powerhouse Rail. “Now is the time to advance that northern agenda in the national interest. The prime minister must now deliver,” said chief executive Barry White.

    “We’ve been encouraged by promises to fully commit to Northern Powerhouse Rail, and invest in our strategic and local roads. That, and tackling the challenge of making our networks greener and more inclusive, will be critical in the coming months and years,” he said.

    A source close to the chancellor, Sajid Javid, said no decisions had yet been made on how to spend the £78bn. “Broadly what we are looking for is projects that will improve productivity, offer good value for money and make a real difference to people’s lives,” they said.


    https://www.theguardian.com/politics...box=1576430790
    There is more stupidity than hydrogen in the universe, and it has a longer shelf life.”

    ― Frank Zappa





  12. #9012

    Re: World News Random, Random

    There have been plenty of articles about the failings of Tories, but here is a really good one about Labor party too. I think large parts of it are true... For those who don't know late 70-ties was a bad time to live in UK.

    Jeremy Corbyn’s Followers Are Stuck in the 1970s

    After a devastating election loss, the U.K. Labour Party has maintained the delusion that it won the argument, while dismissing those who voted against it as morally inferior.

    The catastrophic defeat of party leader Jeremy Corbyn has shattered the British Labour Party, leaving it in no condition to fight the Conservatives anytime soon, so its members are now turning their anger and hatred on one another. The party and its base were already deeply split about Brexit and unable in the end to come to a decision about the referendum result. Their election loss on Dec. 12 has only made this worse.

    Historically, the success of the U.K. labor movement (which was once more than just a party) lay in binding the interests and the imaginations of the working class with sections of the metropolitan middle classes. Socialism, while it worked, was simultaneously a theory and a communal practice, as any religion must be.

    After Boris Johnson’s Conservative Party breached the so-called red wall of industrial and semi-rural seats across England’s North and Midlands, which had been safe Labour territory since the 1930s, the British left has been searching for answers about what broke that alliance.

    Corbyn is part of the answer. But his personal failings can’t account for all of the problem. After all, even the most enthusiastic Corbynistas I know would agree in private that he wasn’t the messiah. They just couldn’t see that his weakness as a leader mattered because the cause, and the style of politics that he represented, was to his followers so transcendentally attractive that they felt it must seem the same to everyone else.

    Even before they lost, the reverence with which Labour activists spoke of “the manifesto”—the promises the party made before and during the campaign—was astonishing. By Election Day, the party was promising not just to rescue the National Health Service and to renationalize the railways but also free tuition, free broadband, and a four-day week for everyone.By Election Day, the party was promising not just to rescue the National Health Service and to renationalize the railways but also free tuition, free broadband, and a four-day week for everyone. They talked as if there were no difference—no distance—between having a good idea and implementing it. But the chasm between desire and action is where all real politics takes place and all the real choices must be made.

    Yet it wasn’t until after the election that the real extent of this blindness—even to the leadership—became clear. As the dust settled on the rubble of the red wall, Corbyn announced that he had “won the arguments,” as if this delusion constituted a moral victory.

    Listening to Labour before the election, I was haunted by a tune I couldn’t for weeks identify, and then I remembered: It was “Hijack” from Jefferson Starship’s 1970 album, when the group sings, “Come on! Free minds, free bodies, free dope, free music—the day is on its way and the day is ours.”

    It was the dream of fully automated luxury communism more than 40 years before the phrase was coined. This is politics for people who have never really had a problem of scarcity but who think they understand the people who do. They’ve never actually governed, and so they’ve never had to choose between equally dreadful alternatives. For them, all shopping is recreational.

    But the voters who do have to make those terrible choices, and who live every day with what you might call old-fashioned scarcity, can suss this fallacy out. They will always reject politicians who claim that no one will have to pay for anything. Successful demagogues make their pitch by promising it is outsiders who will pay (Brexit will bring 350 million pounds a week for the NHS, Mexico will pay for the wall)—but at least they are explicit about the cost.

    The Corbynist left could be divided in two age groups: those too young to remember the 1970s at all and those too fossilized to forget them.The Corbynist left could be divided in two age groups: those too young to remember the 1970s at all and those too fossilized to forget them. So neither group learned anything from the history that actually happened. The dream of a world of abundance and kindness never really recovered from the oil shocks and the breakdown of the Keynesian economic orthodoxy.

    By the end of the 1970s, the Labour Party seemed intellectually and politically exhausted, unable to control the country or to keep the currency stable. In 1979, the Conservative Party’s Margaret Thatcher won a majority; in 1983, she won a much bigger one running against the kind of socialism that Jeremy Corbyn still believes in. The people, it turned out, did not concede to socialism the moral authority that socialists thought self-evident. Capitalism seemed more likely to deliver what it promised.

    The four freedoms of Jefferson Starship were narrowed down to two: free minds and free bodies. This understanding of freedom as individual autonomy gave us today’s immense inequalities, the moral monstrosity of Silicon Valley, and once more uncontrollable economies.

    Communal solutions are often much better than individual ones. But they come at a price, and this isn’t honestly admitted by the contemporary left. The painful price of communal solutions is not really the money or the taxation that must pay for them: Often, as with the NHS compared to the U.S. health care system, they are much cheaper than the alternatives even in the short term.

    What keeps them going, though, is not just their comparative efficiency but their moral authority. When people say that the NHS could not keep going without the idealism of the staff, this is not fluff but the sober truth. If people stop believing in the BBC, they will no longer willingly pay the license fees that all British TV viewers are required to pay, as its enemies have grasped.

    For communal solutions to work, the minority must sometimes concede that the majority is right, and this is very hard for progressives to understand. Progressives are by definition an elitist minority: They think they have reached the future before everyone else and that the majority will have to follow them.Progressives are by definition an elitist minority: They think they have reached the future before everyone else and that the majority will have to follow them. But sometimes the majority just won’t. And when that happens, the majority can’t, in a democracy, be coerced. This is the lesson the old Corbynists failed to learn in the 1980s and the new ones refuse to learn today.

    The temptation for Labour, at a time when it seems to have nothing else left, is to cling to its moral authority harder than ever. But the defining characteristic of moral authority is that it’s not yours; it’s granted by other people. It’s not free, and no one is entitled to it. The word for people who only think they have it is not “moral” but “self-righteous.”

    The Labour Party is now doomed unless its politicians concede that most of the people who did not vote for them are not in fact morally disgusting. Only then will the party itself cease to appear so repellent to so many of its former voters.


    https://foreignpolicy.com/2019/12/17...rson-starship/
    Roger forever

  13. #9013

    Re: World News Random, Random

    Quote Originally Posted by suliso View Post
    There have been plenty of articles about the failings of Tories, but here is a really good one about Labor party too. I think large parts of it are true... For those who don't know late 70-ties was a bad time to live in UK.

    Jeremy Corbyn’s Followers Are Stuck in the 1970s

    After a devastating election loss, the U.K. Labour Party has maintained the delusion that it won the argument, while dismissing those who voted against it as morally inferior.

    The catastrophic defeat of party leader Jeremy Corbyn has shattered the British Labour Party, leaving it in no condition to fight the Conservatives anytime soon, so its members are now turning their anger and hatred on one another. The party and its base were already deeply split about Brexit and unable in the end to come to a decision about the referendum result. Their election loss on Dec. 12 has only made this worse.

    Historically, the success of the U.K. labor movement (which was once more than just a party) lay in binding the interests and the imaginations of the working class with sections of the metropolitan middle classes. Socialism, while it worked, was simultaneously a theory and a communal practice, as any religion must be.

    After Boris Johnson’s Conservative Party breached the so-called red wall of industrial and semi-rural seats across England’s North and Midlands, which had been safe Labour territory since the 1930s, the British left has been searching for answers about what broke that alliance.

    Corbyn is part of the answer. But his personal failings can’t account for all of the problem. After all, even the most enthusiastic Corbynistas I know would agree in private that he wasn’t the messiah. They just couldn’t see that his weakness as a leader mattered because the cause, and the style of politics that he represented, was to his followers so transcendentally attractive that they felt it must seem the same to everyone else.

    Even before they lost, the reverence with which Labour activists spoke of “the manifesto”—the promises the party made before and during the campaign—was astonishing. By Election Day, the party was promising not just to rescue the National Health Service and to renationalize the railways but also free tuition, free broadband, and a four-day week for everyone.By Election Day, the party was promising not just to rescue the National Health Service and to renationalize the railways but also free tuition, free broadband, and a four-day week for everyone. They talked as if there were no difference—no distance—between having a good idea and implementing it. But the chasm between desire and action is where all real politics takes place and all the real choices must be made.

    Yet it wasn’t until after the election that the real extent of this blindness—even to the leadership—became clear. As the dust settled on the rubble of the red wall, Corbyn announced that he had “won the arguments,” as if this delusion constituted a moral victory.

    Listening to Labour before the election, I was haunted by a tune I couldn’t for weeks identify, and then I remembered: It was “Hijack” from Jefferson Starship’s 1970 album, when the group sings, “Come on! Free minds, free bodies, free dope, free music—the day is on its way and the day is ours.”

    It was the dream of fully automated luxury communism more than 40 years before the phrase was coined. This is politics for people who have never really had a problem of scarcity but who think they understand the people who do. They’ve never actually governed, and so they’ve never had to choose between equally dreadful alternatives. For them, all shopping is recreational.

    But the voters who do have to make those terrible choices, and who live every day with what you might call old-fashioned scarcity, can suss this fallacy out. They will always reject politicians who claim that no one will have to pay for anything. Successful demagogues make their pitch by promising it is outsiders who will pay (Brexit will bring 350 million pounds a week for the NHS, Mexico will pay for the wall)—but at least they are explicit about the cost.

    The Corbynist left could be divided in two age groups: those too young to remember the 1970s at all and those too fossilized to forget them.The Corbynist left could be divided in two age groups: those too young to remember the 1970s at all and those too fossilized to forget them. So neither group learned anything from the history that actually happened. The dream of a world of abundance and kindness never really recovered from the oil shocks and the breakdown of the Keynesian economic orthodoxy.

    By the end of the 1970s, the Labour Party seemed intellectually and politically exhausted, unable to control the country or to keep the currency stable. In 1979, the Conservative Party’s Margaret Thatcher won a majority; in 1983, she won a much bigger one running against the kind of socialism that Jeremy Corbyn still believes in. The people, it turned out, did not concede to socialism the moral authority that socialists thought self-evident. Capitalism seemed more likely to deliver what it promised.

    The four freedoms of Jefferson Starship were narrowed down to two: free minds and free bodies. This understanding of freedom as individual autonomy gave us today’s immense inequalities, the moral monstrosity of Silicon Valley, and once more uncontrollable economies.

    Communal solutions are often much better than individual ones. But they come at a price, and this isn’t honestly admitted by the contemporary left. The painful price of communal solutions is not really the money or the taxation that must pay for them: Often, as with the NHS compared to the U.S. health care system, they are much cheaper than the alternatives even in the short term.

    What keeps them going, though, is not just their comparative efficiency but their moral authority. When people say that the NHS could not keep going without the idealism of the staff, this is not fluff but the sober truth. If people stop believing in the BBC, they will no longer willingly pay the license fees that all British TV viewers are required to pay, as its enemies have grasped.

    For communal solutions to work, the minority must sometimes concede that the majority is right, and this is very hard for progressives to understand. Progressives are by definition an elitist minority: They think they have reached the future before everyone else and that the majority will have to follow them.Progressives are by definition an elitist minority: They think they have reached the future before everyone else and that the majority will have to follow them. But sometimes the majority just won’t. And when that happens, the majority can’t, in a democracy, be coerced. This is the lesson the old Corbynists failed to learn in the 1980s and the new ones refuse to learn today.

    The temptation for Labour, at a time when it seems to have nothing else left, is to cling to its moral authority harder than ever. But the defining characteristic of moral authority is that it’s not yours; it’s granted by other people. It’s not free, and no one is entitled to it. The word for people who only think they have it is not “moral” but “self-righteous.”

    The Labour Party is now doomed unless its politicians concede that most of the people who did not vote for them are not in fact morally disgusting. Only then will the party itself cease to appear so repellent to so many of its former voters.


    https://foreignpolicy.com/2019/12/17...rson-starship/
    This is a interesting article and thought provoking in the context of the U.S. political situation. I do think that there could be some parallels to the campaigns of the Democrats, since there doesn't not seem to be a robust "twitterverse" of moderates/center-left voices to counter the left, and I'm not sure what that might mean, politically and electorally, but it does give me pause.

    I know that there was a movement out here in Arizona to censure Kirsten Sinema at the state Democratic level for not being progressive enough, which is crazy, because I don't think that a Sanders/Warren type progressive would have defeated Martha McSally. And now some people want to censure someone who is one your side that majority of the time (vs. the alternative). I think that Arizona Democrats should be thanking her, not trying to censure her. Sure, I might not agree with every vote, but at least I know that she has given thought to them, instead of blindly voting on a purely partisan basis.
    "And for my next fearless prediction..."

  14. #9014

    Re: World News Random, Random

    I liked this sentence:
    "Socialism, while it worked, was simultaneously a theory and a communal practice, as any religion must be."

    Quite an interesting way of expressing your disdain for the idea.
    My problem with these modern politics is that they seem not to understand that once you get elected, you stop being a "member of a party". That moment your loyalty to the party must cease as you have become what you sought: a public servant. And therefore, although you must stick to principles, you must also listen to all the constituency.
    It is one of the things that kill us here in S. America. When the opposite side wins you become a non-citizen. So the gap grows.
    Missing winter...

  15. #9015

    Re: World News Random, Random

    Meanwhile, new pres. Fernandez has de facto devaluated a 30%. They sustain the pantomime of a dollar at 63ish pesos but basically any dollar you spend abroad (even in e-commerce) or buy to hold carries a 30% non-refundable tax, which gives you a real dollar at 80+ pesos. Lovely.

    Exceptions are medical treatments, books and for big business. The rest of us are screwed.
    Meet again we do, old foe...

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