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  1. #796

    Re: Other Sports Random, Random

    Footballer Fabrice Muamba collapsed during play and is said to have suffered a heart attack. The match was suspended.
    Oh heaven...I wake with good intentions but the day it always lasts too long... Emeli Sande

  2. #797

    Re: Other Sports Random, Random

    "Bolton Wanderers can confirm that Fabrice Muamba has been admitted to The Heart Attack Centre at The London Chest Hospital where he is in a critically ill condition in intensive care," said a joint statement from Bolton and the hospital released at 2130 GMT on Saturday.
    "No further information will be issued at this stage. The club and hospital request that the media and public respect the family's privacy at this time."
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/football/17417973

    Where there's life, there's hope

    :hope:

    When it happened, there wasn't a lot of hope around. There have been several incidents like this in the last decade where players have died on the pitch.

  3. #798

    Re: Other Sports Random, Random

    Thanks Edmond.
    Oh heaven...I wake with good intentions but the day it always lasts too long... Emeli Sande

  4. #799

    Re: Other Sports Random, Random

    Doug Robson just posted a piece on Jessica Korda that includes mention of her and her sister's friendships with the younger Lendls:

    Jessica and Nelly — who Petr says is a promising golfer, too — are close with the Lendl girls.

    "My sister is best friends with the youngest (Lendl daughter) who is the same age, and Marika and Isabelle (two of Lendl's three eldest children) took care of me pretty much when I was younger in terms of taking me to golf and like being my big sisters," Korda says.

    Two of Lendl's daughters are on the University of Florida women's golf team, and another, Danielle, 18, plays for the University of Alabama.

    Having such close friends at rival SEC schools can cause tension.

    "I've got a huge problem when they play each other in football," Korda says, with a laugh.
    http://www.usatoday.com/sports/golf/...rda/53656622/1
    Measured Extravagance: at TAT's Amazon store (Kindle), BN.com (Nook/epub), and other vendors.

  5. #800

    Re: Other Sports Random, Random

    Jerry Sandusky seeks dismissal of charges, alleging several different reasons. None, absolutely NONE are related to the infinitely remote possibility that he is not guilty.
    http://rivals.yahoo.com/ncaa/footbal...ennstate-abuse

    In ancient Greece, sometimes they used to skin people alive peeling their skin off their bones using sharp oyster shells. Uhm...
    Last edited by ponchi101; 03-22-2012 at 03:34 PM.
    50 ways to leave your (non) lover: "I hope you understand me when I say it was torture having met you"

  6. #801

    Re: Other Sports Random, Random

    In ancient Greece they also had teenage boys as lovers. I am just saying...

  7. #802

    Re: Other Sports Random, Random

    Quote Originally Posted by suliso View Post
    In ancient Greece they also had teenage boys as lovers. I am just saying...
    Touche!
    50 ways to leave your (non) lover: "I hope you understand me when I say it was torture having met you"

  8. #803

    Re: Other Sports Random, Random

    Johanna Quaas at the German Gymnastics Championships this weekend. Here's her floor exercise - btw, she's 86 years old.

    86 year old gymnastics champion
    Ssshh. Don't tell PEHK I am cheating on him with Dominic Thiem!

  9. #804
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    Re: Other Sports Random, Random

    I don't think I can do a cartwheel now, let alone at 86.

  10. #805
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    123 GO Champion, Ball Of Madness Champion, Solitare Champion, Midi Golf Champion, Yeti Sports 8- Jungle Swing Champion, Base Jumping Champion, Putt it in Golf Champion, Yetisports 10 - Icicle Climb Champion, 247 Mini Golf Champion, Flash Golf Champion, Battleship Champion, Yeti 1 Greece Champion, Archery Champion dryrunguy's Avatar
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    Re: Other Sports Random, Random

    That totally warms the heart.
    Gender should never be a death sentence. http://www.facebook.com/The.Worldwide.War.on.Girls. A civilized nation doesn't tolerate violence against women. http://www.facebook.com/TheSilenceStopsNow?ref=hl. Microlending harbors tremendous potential to improve the economic, social, political, and educational empowerment of women and children. https://www.facebook.com/pages/Globa...417742?fref=ts

  11. #806

    Re: Other Sports Random, Random

    March 31, 2012
    Junior, the Kid, the Fight

    By DAN KLORES

    Fifty years later. If you are Lucy Paret, though, the impoverished widow of Benny, a two-time welterweight champion of the world, you’re hardly calling this an anniversary. Fifty years ago, you decided to stay home in your Bronx apartment building the night your 25-year-old husband was pummeled to death — March 24, 1962 — by the challenger Emile Griffith, a former champion, on live television, an ABC “Friday Night Fights” special.

    It’s been a hard life. One child, the one with whom you were pregnant that night, sits in a Florida Panhandle state penitentiary, more than likely for the rest of his days. The other, Benny Jr., 52, handsome and personable, is beginning to find himself. The boxer’s pension? Never happened. Life insurance? Ten grand come and gone. Sitting in your cramped Miami studio apartment — bed, bath, closet, kitchen, coffee cup — retired after years as a cashier in the strip mall, once a lovely, sexy, proud dancer, you approach every March with dread. Fifty years since the neighbor ran to her door, knocked and said, “Senora, senora, algo malo ha ocurrido.” (“Something bad has happened.”) Benny was hurt, clobbered, taken from the Madison Square Garden ring by stretcher.

    Fifty years since the referee, Ruby Goldstein, having just been lionized on “The Ed Sullivan Show” for stopping a bout before a fighter got “really hurt,” choked. That night, he watched, too, as did millions of Americans — in the lower left-hand corner of the television screen, the black-and-white blows that never stopped as Griffith crushed Benny. Even the gangsters, the jocks and the movie stars at ringside were thinking this might have gone too far. The smelling salts failed, too.

    The ambulance from St. Luke’s drove up. The reporters feigned sensitivity. The 10-day coma, the funeral home, the Cuban mother-in-law arrived, courtesy of Pan Am. She detested you as a light-skinned Puerto Rican, wondered about the purse, went back home, and you never heard a word from her again. Fifty years of struggle, of never feeling good enough about yourself to marry again, of daily routines taking their toll, of occasional visits to his grave in the Bronx.

    He entered the ring that night, battered four months earlier by a human bulldozer — the bigger, stronger, tougher middleweight champion Gene Fullmer, who rocked him so badly that the Kid (that’s what they called Benny) should never have been allowed back in the ring. But the New York State Athletic commissioners and the doctors said he would be fine.

    The Kid was illiterate in two languages. He had arrived from Cuba a few years before Fidel Castro took over. His family stayed behind, so he was left trusting his older, wiser, charismatic manager, Manuel Alfaro, a successful entrepreneur and nightclub owner. They had a plan. After he beat Griffith, Benny would have a few additional title defenses, then he could own a butcher shop on the Grand Concourse. It would mean success.

    Lucy? “Nah. Not for me.” She never liked the fight game. She didn’t get a thrill watching him get whipped. Manuel, however, had all the answers. He had most of the $35,000 purse, too. He had Benny’s ear, mind and body. She wouldn’t go to the Garden that night. She would sit at home with the baby, while Adolfo played in her belly.

    Emile Griffith grew up as a man-child at a boys’ detention home in the Virgin Islands. With a body by David, 28-inch waist, 46-inch chest, 146 pounds, he spent his adolescence and early teenage years standing in brutal heat, barefoot on rocks, forced to hold water buckets in each arm, punished for whatever sadistic thoughts entered the minds of authority figures, thirsty for escape. At night, the men or bigger boys came to him. They took.

    Soon his Mommy moved to New York, the immigrant’s dream, but left the children behind. The oldest of eight, Emile got the call first a year later to come north, where he played baseball, swam, defended the weak on the Harlem streets. A grade-school dropout, with a high, delightful, innocent singsong voice, he started moving racks part time in the Garment Center. Emile was “discovered” by two young men, the Irish trainer Gil Clancy, a World War II veteran with a master’s degree in education, and the Jewish garmento Howie Albert, a big-time personality and ex-fighter. “It was the only partnership in history,” Clancy quipped, “where the Irishman and Jew teamed up, and the mick had the brains.”

    Emile became a Golden Gloves legend. He climbed the professional ranks quickly. The myths and narratives created a clean biography: he was a hat designer, creative, and he loved blonde Scandinavian beauties. Two facts were straight, though. He was a vicious counterpuncher, and after each victory, he honored Mommy’s dream by moving up one of his siblings. Soon, he bought a house in the Hollis section of Queens, for the entire clan.

    Clancy kept his prodigy away from the gangsters Blinky Palermo and Frankie Carbo, who had “owned” a bunch of previous champions, including Don Jordan, the welterweight king Paret first beat in 1960 to become the world champion. Soon after, however, Emile took the crown from Benny, who then won it back, setting up the rubber match on March 24, 1962.

    Emile’s escape became the gay bars around Times Square, private places of peace, affection and sex.

    “Where does he go?” Clancy said. “I don’t know,” his brother or Albert would reply. “Has anyone seen my Junior?” Mommy said.

    One friend was shot, crippled for life. Emile cried and cried. The pain made worse with no one to tell.

    He got to the weigh-in the day of the fight, not the absurd Don King/Bob Arum sideshow of today. Just a bunch of scribes from the city’s seven daily newspapers and a few still photographers. Benny wanted an edge. Manuel gave it to him. The Kid patted Emile on the behind and drew his lips close to Emile’s ear. He whispered a gay slur in Spanish, “Maricón, maricón.” Emile, shaken, looked around, hoping no one else had heard. He then lunged at Paret, his tormentor. Their handlers jumped in to break it up.

    Clancy spent the afternoon walking Emile, 24, around the long Manhattan blocks between Eighth and Ninth Avenues. His mission was to calm down the man-child so he would be ready to beat Paret senseless. He certainly wasn’t going to address the humiliating insult. No matter, Benny got his edge. In the sixth round, he shocked the Garden crowd, flattening Mommy’s favorite, Junior.

    At home, boys and men, fathers, uncles and granddaddies sat glued to their 18-inch Admiral TVs as they did every weekend night. “Friday Night Fights,” their moment to be together. It was the 1960s, and pop psychologists hadn’t yet come up with terms like bonding and sharing.

    For 12-year-olds like me, who liked “the fights,” the routine was an early lesson in deception and love. The voice of the announcer Don Dunphy, accompanied by the sponsor’s Madison Avenue jingle, began at 10 p.m. sharp, which was either too late to stay up or meant it was the end of the workweek for your struggling father who simply wanted to watch the fight alone. A chair, an ottoman, a Piels and red pistachios. “Go to sleep,” was the order. You went to the bed, turned out the lights, got under the sheets, told your little brother if he said a word, he was finished, and turned the 12-inch on low, getting ready to watch, praying that they didn’t hear, rush in and turn the TV off.

    Every week, I kept a running list in pencil, on loose-leaf paper: the date and site, who fought, their weight and the results. I kept score, too, according to the 10-point round system. I was self-taught and hid the evidence between the hardcover books on the manmade shelves, somewhere between Jack London and Quentin Reynolds. I was either too young to recognize that he had to know I was “cheating,” or too needy to understand that he didn’t care that I was trying to reach out to him. What I loved were the combatants. They didn’t leave like the Duke and Furillo and Gilliam. They were tough men: Sugar Ray, Basilio, Paul Pender, Terry Downs, Tiger Jones, Spider Webb, Florentino Fernandez, Luis Rodriguez, Hurricane Carter, Joey Giardello.

    Emile fought back. By the 10th and 11th rounds, he took control of the fight. By the 12th, he had killed Benny.

    Bottom left-hand corner. He was trapped in the ropes, one arm draped over, the other doing anything to stop the blows: 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, maybe more, all to the head. Benny’s arms stopped moving. So did Goldstein’s legs. Finally, Manuel jumped into the ring. Emile had reclaimed his title.

    Every dubious politician worldwide was enraged. Wagner, Rockefeller, the local New York State hacks, the Vatican, the Diet of Japan, British Parliament spewed “abolish the sport.” They succeeded in going home to tell the wife to watch them on TV or to read about them in The New York Times.

    Ten days in a coma. Once, while talking to Benny, Lucy felt his hand move. “Maybe,” she said. “God has heard my prayers.” A few months later, she gave birth and moved to Miami, her place in history etched in his tombstone. They became anecdotes.

    Eventually, Emile got back in the ring. He won and lost the welterweight and middleweight titles four more times. He fought way too long, even married a woman, which lasted a few months. Joe Frazier was his best man at a lavish affair at the Concord Hotel in the Catskills.

    How can you possibly be the same? How can a man endure the trauma of killing another while being told that nothing had changed?

    In 1992, 15 years into retirement, he walked out of a gay bar near New York’s Port Authority. Five teenage thugs, one carrying a baseball bat, decided to mug him. They never figured the tipsy old man was a six-time world champion. He fought back and lost. The brain damage, compounded by more than 200 prizefights, was severe. Even then, at 54, Emile got off the pavement, took the subway to Queens, his head battered as if a piñata, bleeding; ribs, jaw and spleen broken. His cries and moans awakened Luis, his lover and “adopted son,” asleep in their basement enclave. Startled, he yelled for Mommy to get up. They took him to Elmhurst General Hospital, where he spent the next four months.

    Lucy has been at the side of her two sons, no matter the fault. She has aged with grace and dignity, but with no money, no help, no in-laws, no benefits. She remembers 50 years ago. She can see Benny’s smile, sometimes hear his voice, but there is no touch, no embrace, no comfort in the legend.

    Emile no longer worries. He lives in a nursing home in Hempstead, N.Y. Clancy and Albert have died. Only Luis and his biographer and friend Ron Ross visit. His dementia has no cure. Emile fought more championship rounds at Madison Square Garden than any other fighter in history, but he stands alone, naked as the lion that enters the Colosseum.

    Dan Klores, a Peabody Award-winning filmmaker and playwright, directed “Ring of Fire: The Emile Griffith Story.”


    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/01/sp...rce=feedburner
    Oh heaven...I wake with good intentions but the day it always lasts too long... Emeli Sande

  12. #807

    Re: Other Sports Random, Random

    Police said Sunday that they are satisfied with their work to control the crowds that spilled onto the street after the University of Kentucky defeated rival Louisville, despite the images of rowdy revelers burning couches and a car that had been flipped over.

    So while authorities are evaluating how things went as they prepare for the possibility of more celebrations ahead of Monday night's Final Four Championship game, they aren't anticipating big changes to their plans.

    The Lexington Herald-Leader reported that police had to dodge beer bottles while putting out dozens of fires in the streets.

    Lexington police spokeswoman Sherelle Roberts said there were less than 20 people arrested, no serious injuries and no serious property damage. She said nothing happened that wasn't anticipated and that police were "very pleased."
    "I think we did pretty good, all things considered," she said.

    She said the department would meet Sunday afternoon to evaluate things and determine whether any adjustments are needed Monday, when the Wildcats play in the championship.

    Kentucky players and coach John Calipari expressed shock and disappointment over their fans' actions.


    "Our fans are real crazy about us. If we win tomorrow, it'll be even more crazy," said guard Doron Lamb.
    Guard Darious Miller said it looked "pretty crazy" from the videos he got on his cell phone.

    "I don't know how to explain it," he said. "Hopefully everyone makes it out OK."

    Coach John Calipari said he was disappointed to hear about the chaos in Lexington, and he had team spokesman DeWayne Peevey use Twitter to encourage fans to calm down. He said it might be that some fans just had too much to drink.

    "The state of Kentucky is so connected to this program. It's the commonwealth's team. They go overboard sometimes," he said.

    Police had braced for the possibility of post-game violence and resorted to pepper spray, though large amounts weren't needed before they ultimately began dispersing the throngs, Roberts said.

    She said 150 officers deployed on the streets at one point to quell what she called "a very dangerous situation" with the fires and violence that dragged on for hours.
    The scene was similar in 1998 when Kentucky won the national championship game. That year, 300 officers in full riot gear lined downtown streets as a mob of nearly 15,000 fans celebrated.

    Police made 10 arrests, and 25 people were treated for minor injuries.

    Two years prior to that, though, chaos ensued following Kentucky's championship game – officers were pelted with beer bottles, and a television news crew's van was overturned.
    ___
    Yonker reported from Louisville, Ky. Fly reported from New Orleans.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/huff-w...kentucky-fans/
    Oh heaven...I wake with good intentions but the day it always lasts too long... Emeli Sande

  13. #808

    Re: Other Sports Random, Random

    Bobby Knight fell asleep on the air Saturday.

    http://youtu.be/3NpehUWhLGo
    Oh heaven...I wake with good intentions but the day it always lasts too long... Emeli Sande

  14. #809
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    Re: Other Sports Random, Random

    Quote Originally Posted by Ti-Amie View Post
    Police said Sunday that they are satisfied with their work to control the crowds that spilled onto the street after the University of Kentucky defeated rival Louisville, despite the images of rowdy revelers burning couches and a car that had been flipped over.

    So while authorities are evaluating how things went as they prepare for the possibility of more celebrations ahead of Monday night's Final Four Championship game, they aren't anticipating big changes to their plans.

    The Lexington Herald-Leader reported that police had to dodge beer bottles while putting out dozens of fires in the streets.

    Lexington police spokeswoman Sherelle Roberts said there were less than 20 people arrested, no serious injuries and no serious property damage. She said nothing happened that wasn't anticipated and that police were "very pleased."
    "I think we did pretty good, all things considered," she said.

    She said the department would meet Sunday afternoon to evaluate things and determine whether any adjustments are needed Monday, when the Wildcats play in the championship.

    Kentucky players and coach John Calipari expressed shock and disappointment over their fans' actions.


    "Our fans are real crazy about us. If we win tomorrow, it'll be even more crazy," said guard Doron Lamb.
    Guard Darious Miller said it looked "pretty crazy" from the videos he got on his cell phone.

    "I don't know how to explain it," he said. "Hopefully everyone makes it out OK."

    Coach John Calipari said he was disappointed to hear about the chaos in Lexington, and he had team spokesman DeWayne Peevey use Twitter to encourage fans to calm down. He said it might be that some fans just had too much to drink.

    "The state of Kentucky is so connected to this program. It's the commonwealth's team. They go overboard sometimes," he said.

    Police had braced for the possibility of post-game violence and resorted to pepper spray, though large amounts weren't needed before they ultimately began dispersing the throngs, Roberts said.

    She said 150 officers deployed on the streets at one point to quell what she called "a very dangerous situation" with the fires and violence that dragged on for hours.
    The scene was similar in 1998 when Kentucky won the national championship game. That year, 300 officers in full riot gear lined downtown streets as a mob of nearly 15,000 fans celebrated.

    Police made 10 arrests, and 25 people were treated for minor injuries.

    Two years prior to that, though, chaos ensued following Kentucky's championship game – officers were pelted with beer bottles, and a television news crew's van was overturned.
    ___
    Yonker reported from Louisville, Ky. Fly reported from New Orleans.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/huff-w...kentucky-fans/
    I was there!!

    Granted I took part in exactly 0 acts of destruction and will continue with that inaction tonight once we win the whole thing....I'm not exactly what you would call a "bad-ass"

    But seriously, it was pretty intense and I'm perfectly fine with those people who cross the line being arrested, charged, etc. because all we've heard on campus for the last three weeks is the message that action will be taken if students cross that very bold and obvious line. The police are not even slightly concerned with anything involving the students drinking, which is good because about 85-90% of the campus would be in jail by morning.
    TAT's self-proclaimed resident King of Scrubdom.


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  15. #810
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    Re: Other Sports Random, Random

    Also, the University has called in the National Guard to deal with the crowds tonight...we're SO TOTALLY FAMOUS
    TAT's self-proclaimed resident King of Scrubdom.


    Scrub of the Week (aka whatever period of time until I get to it): Margalita Chakhnashvili - SF at $25K Caserta, ITA

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