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  1. #16906

    Re: National, Regional and Local News

    Even outside work hours, Hannaford would field emails and take calls as her son, Ryan, climbed into her lap and tried to grab her phone. Her husband would plead with her to “get off the computer,” she said, teaching Ryan a trick to get her attention: When she wasn’t responding, her son would call her “Aimee” instead of “Mom.” (Hannaford’s husband declined to comment for this story.)
    “No matter how cynical I get, I just can't keep up.” – Lily Tomlin.




  2. #16907

    Re: National, Regional and Local News

    Yes. I don't respect workaholics. They believe they are setting up and example. In reality, they either are the boss, expecting everybody to work as hard as they do, or their boss uses them as example for everybody else that wants to have a life.
    Screw them.
    Face it. It's the apocalypse.

  3. #16908

    Re: National, Regional and Local News

    That was an oddly uneven story. It really seems like the highlighted example should have been a mother who works 20-30 hours a week, but was one of the first to be laid off, or had to quit because no child care was available, or it was no longer safe for her parents or in-laws to help. That's what all their statistics seemed to be about.

    Instead, they loved the quote "I had to choose to be a mom," and wanted the biggest shock example (a CEO!). Her personal story seemed to be more about a tipping point. Her company and family life were both teetering on the edge of disaster. This situation was a shove, but a poke would have given the same result.

    I agree with the comments about workaholics. I also think, at best, she could only have kept the company alive for another few months. With that being said, I hope she uses some of her savings to hire a good divorce lawyer or assassin.

  4. #16909

    Re: National, Regional and Local News

    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie02123 View Post
    That was an oddly uneven story. It really seems like the highlighted example should have been a mother who works 20-30 hours a week, but was one of the first to be laid off, or had to quit because no child care was available, or it was no longer safe for her parents or in-laws to help. That's what all their statistics seemed to be about.

    Instead, they loved the quote "I had to choose to be a mom," and wanted the biggest shock example (a CEO!). Her personal story seemed to be more about a tipping point. Her company and family life were both teetering on the edge of disaster. This situation was a shove, but a poke would have given the same result.

    I agree with the comments about workaholics. I also think, at best, she could only have kept the company alive for another few months. With that being said, I hope she uses some of her savings to hire a good divorce lawyer or assassin.
    “No matter how cynical I get, I just can't keep up.” – Lily Tomlin.




  5. #16910

    Re: National, Regional and Local News

    [B]If day cares closed because of the novel coronavirus, Aimee Rae Hannaford expected her family to fare better than most. [B]She worked full time as the chief executive of a tech company while her husband stayed home. He’d been taking some time off from his own tech career, managing a rental property while considering his options. He could look after their 3-year-old son, she thought — at least for a while.

    “That lasted a grand total of three days,” Hannaford said.

    Once her son was home full time, she realized they’d need a different solution. She was holed up in the guest room, wielding dual-monitors at her desk. Her husband was exhausted. “I can’t do it,” she remembers him saying: “I can’t watch him for this long.”


    But could she ask her husband to handle 12-hour shifts of child care, with no help, no breaks and no clear end point? She wasn’t sure her family could survive that. She wasn’t sure he’d do it, even if she asked.

    “I thought to myself, ‘I can carry this company forward, but I’m going to be so broken. My son will be so broken. My husband will be so broken.’ ”

    On March 16, with schools and day cares on the verge of closing, Hannaford and her co-founder agreed to dissolve their company, laying off all their employees. Hannaford brought home eight of the office chairs, wheeling them into her dining room, one by one. Her family would live off their savings until the pandemic subsided.

    In the end, Hannaford said, she felt she only had one option: “I had to choose being a mother and being at home.”

    The decision to quit is a privilege. Hannaford knows she might struggle to find a new job. Once all this is over, she would love to work in a director or program manager role for a large tech company. But she suspects she’s not exactly what they’re looking for.




    I understand that these are older parents (I assume the husband is near her age), but it is extremely sad on so many levels...the man's whiny (really, you can't do it? Because there are literally thousands, if not millions of older parents/grandparents that have to do it, with far less means than this couple). Suck it up. Yes, it is hard. Sometimes life is. And the thing that is often most irritating are these are the kind of people (I'm not saying this couple is personally) that often begrudge child care workers decent wages but "can't" do it themselves. These folks seems to be poster people for privilege, although I know that wasn't her intention.

    As for the camps, I understand that there is a new competition to have your kid the most __________ (you fill in the blank), but this wasn't really an issue where/when I grew up because most of us had chores that we had to do, whether it was vacuuming, doing laundry, tending the garden (which wasn't a vanity project but a major source of our food during the summer, and often involved putting up large quantities of produce for the winter, whether by canning or freezing), lawn care (without all of today's fancy tools), or helping our father with his work (he ran his own business and often worked 12 hour days). If you had free time, you (gasp) read a book, played a board game, or, in the evening, watched one of the 3 network broadcast channels (PBS wasn't an option because it's signal wasn't strong enough).

    I'm not saying people have to go back to the stone age and walk miles through the snowdrifts to get to school, but about teaching kids how to entertain themselves (with the realization that you don't/won't be entertained 100% of the time) and to assist with the running of a household. Just a thought, and my apologies for venting (I often heard "this isn't fun" in the classroom when I had the kids write down even a couple of pages of notes - it was/is one of my pet peeves).
    Last edited by Jeff in TX; Yesterday at 09:58 PM. Reason: grammar correction
    "And for my next fearless prediction..."

  6. #16911
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    Re: National, Regional and Local News

    Especially in the U.S. and other minority world countries, we are accustomed to making life decisions based on ideal scenarios. We buy a house operating on the assumption that all variables will remain the same. (A huge mistake, because things like income are huge variables.) We buy a new car based on the assumption that all variables will remain the same.

    We have to start taking these variables more seriously. This virus is teaching some of us that. The hard way.

    Of course, none of this applies to the poor or marginalized. Their lives are nothing but variables.
    Winston, a.k.a. Alvena Rae Risley Hiatt (1944-2019), RIP

  7. #16912

    Re: National, Regional and Local News

    As a parent of four pre-teens with a wife who works full time backshift...a lot of that story made me roll my eyes.
    A Canadian Slam winner? Inconceivable!

  8. #16913

    Re: National, Regional and Local News

    Quote Originally Posted by dryrunguy View Post
    Especially in the U.S. and other minority world countries, we are accustomed to making life decisions based on ideal scenarios. We buy a house operating on the assumption that all variables will remain the same. (A huge mistake, because things like income are huge variables.) We buy a new car based on the assumption that all variables will remain the same.

    We have to start taking these variables more seriously. This virus is teaching some of us that. The hard way.

    Of course, none of this applies to the poor or marginalized. Their lives are nothing but variables.
    Always, always do a PRE-MORTEM analysis. Not "What can go wrong". Do a "If it goes wrong, then WHAT happens".
    Sad story. My dear friend R had it all. A wonderful house here in Colorado (he was the one that brought me here), a great GMC luxury truck. Life was good, we had work, income was steady.
    Then in 2014 oil tanked, the industry was shattered and he had a loan for that car and one for that house. Unable to eventually pay the bills, he traded his truck first. Surprise! He had basically just paid interest, so he left the lot with a beat up GMC pick up. Eventually he had to sell the house, and the same thing happened. His mortgage was still only half way so most of what he had paid had gone to interest payments. Out of a house worth $250K, he was able to keep $40K. After paying off the credit cards, far less.
    And it was because he always thought there would always be work. As a surveyors' supervisor, his position was eliminated by automation (better and better GPS systems). He has been unable to switch to another industry and now lives off social security.
    Again. Never assume your income will remain the same forever. If you can buy one basic car cash, or the luxury version on credit, use the cash. At least if you need to sell it again, you keep everything that remains.
    And as Dry says. The poor love differently. But that is a story for another day.
    Face it. It's the apocalypse.

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