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View Full Version : Carmelo Now Slapped With New, Permanent Stigma



Moose
12-18-2006, 07:18 PM
Dec. 18, 2006
By Mike Freeman
CBS SportsLine.com National Columnist


Carmelo Anthony might go on to become the greatest scorer of all time. He might become a priest, head of state, the freakin' president.

He might do this charitable act or that one. He might donate blood until his marrow is gone or build a straw hut for the poor in China. He might compel moms around the world to line up their daughters to marry him.

But no matter what he does, I will always remember Anthony for what I saw over the weekend -- I saw a punk throw a sucker-slap. I saw an ugly turning point in a young career.

I will remember someone completely unaware of the grand stage upon which he sits. I will remember a man who tried to be a tough guy, forgetting that he is no longer on Mean Street but Madison Avenue. The big, wide stage. Anthony does not yet understand that his professional life has just drastically changed. He does not know how close he came to being Kermit Washington.

I was at home watching this monstrosity unfold on TV. As has been the case this year, the inside of the Garden was quiet. It's understandable. New York Knicks fans are so disgusted by the team's performance, they're tired of booing. It's wasted energy. They just started to leave the building.

After the initial wave of punches and bodies tumbled into the stands, things settled down, and it appeared the brawl was over. Then you can see Anthony, creeping closer to the mass of bodies that included the original thug that started the brawl, the Knicks' Mardy Collins.

It was so quiet in the Garden, you could hear Anthony's slap. Really, you could hear it. I worked the TiVo overtime. Bo-bup, smack! Bo-bup, smack Then the shock from the remaining crowd as they could not believe what Anthony had just done.

While thug Collins is the original gangster in this on-court mess, Anthony is the bigger culprit. The brawl does not truly turn nasty until he unleashes that gutless attack.

In fact, most comical about what Anthony did was that after tossing the sucker slap-punch, he rushed out of the crowd of players like a back peddling defensive back, bolting so quickly you would think he was being chased by Shawne Merriman.

We all make mistakes. I also understand the hypocrisy of how brawls in hockey are part of the sport but fights in basketball are seen through a different sporting and social prism.

That's all true. But until basketball decides to incorporate mixed-martial arts into its sport, just understand you cannot brawl. What about that do players not understand?

Anthony's mistake was epic. The reason why has to do with the constantly dwindling number of leaders in professional basketball.

The big three young NBA names the league has held up as the faces of the sport were Dwayne Wade, LeBron James and Anthony, who was leading the league in scoring. Once upon a time Kobe Bryant was on that list until he was revealed as a gold-plated phony and philanderer.

Now, Anthony has slap-punched his way into another place and the NBA is down to two young superstars the NBA can point to as exemplary: Wade and James.


Riot by riot, brawl by brawl, punch by punch, the NBA is entering frightening territory and if the sport is not careful the only people watching will be boxing fans.

"Clearly, this isn't how we or the NBA or anybody wants to be perceived," Knicks coach Isiah Thomas told the media after the fight. "It should have been a foul and a guy takes two free throws. Maybe somebody has words, but it definitely should (have not) escalated into this. This isn't even a rivalry."

We have not even mentioned how Anthony grabbed a Knicks player by the neck, before throwing Knick Channing Frye to the floor, before the now infamous slap-punch.

Commissioner David Stern undoubtedly blew a gasket upon hearing and later seeing tapes of the fight. He has also likely rededicated himself to controlling the way his players dress and act. No more relinquishing control, no more reversing course on which type of basketball to utilize after players publicly complain.

If the players cannot control themselves, I can hear Stern saying, then I will.

And good for him.

Hope it was worth it, Carmelo. Hope getting that slap-punch in was worth the mountain of hell you are going to catch for a long, long time.

http://cbs.sportsline.com/columns/story/9878397

Ti-Amie
12-18-2006, 07:25 PM
Wow! All that endorsement money will be gone. Wonder if the video jock from MTV will stick around now that the big money is gone?

This must have been the week for idiocy. First the opera singer throws a hissy fit and stalks off the stage (they were booing but come on finish the aria!) and now Carmelo has apparently thrown his career down the tubes.

Kinda sad really.

Ti-Amie
12-18-2006, 07:30 PM
Another commentary. The fans overseas may not be as appalled as this guy thinks they are. We talked about that basketball riot in Serbia where the fans were throwing flares at each other and brawling. They may wonder what all the fuss is about.

http://cbs.sportsline.com/nba/story/9878491/rss

tern's firm action in wake of brawl totally called for


Tony Mejia Dec. 18, 2006
By Tony Mejia
CBS SportsLine.com Staff Writer
Tell Tony your opinion!



In a year where David Stern has been accused of micromanaging everything from the dress code to the ball to the temperature of arena locker rooms, the Denver Nuggets and New York Knicks gave him more incentive to tighten the reins.

Rightfully so.

Stern's decision to suspend seven players and fine both organizations $500,000 might be considered another harsh action from an image-conscious commissioner trying to turn the NBA's players into Boy Scouts, but it's precisely what was necessary. A message needed to be sent to the entire world that the NBA isn't a holding cell.

George Karl might face discipline for his choice of words to describe Isiah Thomas. (Getty Images)
George Karl might face discipline for his choice of words to describe Isiah Thomas. (Getty Images)
Whether it's the fact that racism is more rampant than most would dare admit or, as Stern concludes, that his players are more recognizable throughout the globe because they don't wear helmets or caps and are basically out there for everyone to see, the NBA is happy to be held to a higher standard. If players foul up, like Carmelo Anthony, J.R. Smith and Nate Robinson did, you're going to hear a series of "I told you sos" from detractors everywhere.

"I told you they were a bunch of savages."

"I told you you can take the kid out of the street, but not the street out of the kid."

"I told you they're all thugs."

The images of Saturday night were relayed throughout the world, and much like we shake our heads when we see soccer hooligans inciting riots overseas, what do you think was going through the minds of casual observers?

It's bad for the sport, and I for one am glad the NBA has a micromanager putting steps into place that can help combat this sorry image.

Stern called it a "shared responsibility" to prevent episodes such as the one Saturday night at Madison Square Garden, taking the unexpected step of fining two organizations for the actions of their employees. It's a message being sent to the other 28 teams, too. If employees are going to embarrass the NBA under your watch, you're going to pay for it.

"An individual case like this brands everybody," Stern said in a Monday afternoon conference call. "I'm totally prepared to do whatever is necessary so that our games are places that don't place players or fans in physical harm.

"It's not about the teams. It's about the individuals employed by their teams."

Anthony got 15 games, severely crippling Denver's chances to catch Utah in the Northwest Division, because he escalated a situation that was calming down by throwing a sucker punch. The suspension is five games longer than I originally predicted it would be, and Stern's rationale behind it was that Anthony should have taken advantage of the "break or pause in a heated situation to stop and restore order, instead of escalating the situation."

Smith and Robinson got 10 games for punches, scuffling, and running around looking for someone to hit. Both players put the safety of others around them in jeopardy. Mardy Collins, whose foul started the melee, got six games because it was deemed that he utilized more restraint than the other two. Jared Jeffries got four, even though he didn't connect with a fist, because he was an active instigator.

Stern didn't open the Pandora's box of suspending Isiah Thomas, because in his mind, it couldn't be deemed that the situation was premeditated. But there is no doubt the Knicks coach not only tolerated but encouraged the hard foul, and Nuggets coach George Karl couldn't believe that he wasn't disciplined. In a separate press conference held for the Denver media, Karl called Thomas a "jackass" and an "asshole."

When the commissioner was advised of this outburst, he said, "I'll be dealing with the Nuggets organization on that. That's for (owner Stan) Mr. Kroenke to decide (punishment). I'll have a conversation with him about the public comments of his employees. ... However, if things proceed beyond the heat of the moment, I will deal with it myself."

In other words, Stern won't have anybody embarrassing his league. He talks tough and, by his actions, backs it up.

Kirkus
12-18-2006, 07:48 PM
Liberal talk-show host, Ed Schultz said it best in my opinion: "It's hip to be thug."

Sad.

Ti-Amie
12-18-2006, 07:56 PM
Serbian Basketball Riot.
This one for the commentary.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IG-q8Ynrf78

This one for the full scope of the riot.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=833SjpDcZB0&mode=related&search=

Stern would do...what?

Kirkus
12-18-2006, 08:09 PM
I remember when that happened, Ti. Didn't they complete the game?

Ti-Amie
12-18-2006, 08:11 PM
I remember when that happened, Ti. Didn't they complete the game?

The expressions on the players faces are LOL funny. It's like "okay now that that's over can we play some ball?" Too much.

I just wanted to give some perspective on what happened in Madison Square Garden.

owendonovan
12-18-2006, 09:11 PM
I was at that game and the foul ordered by Isaiah Thomas was pretty friigin juvenile. Melo did the wrong thing, but I think Thomas is the bigger culprit. These are mostly young men looking for leadership from their coach. Thomas is as much a punk as anyone who threw a punch. Larry Bird he will never be as much as he would like to. Enjoy the shadow Isaiah. Knicks need real leadership and I look forward to Isaiah losing his job and maybe knocking his ego some.

Moose
12-19-2006, 05:36 AM
I was at that game and the foul ordered by Isaiah Thomas was pretty friigin juvenile. Melo did the wrong thing, but I think Thomas is the bigger culprit. These are mostly young men looking for leadership from their coach. Thomas is as much a punk as anyone who threw a punch. Larry Bird he will never be as much as he would like to. Enjoy the shadow Isaiah. Knicks need real leadership and I look forward to Isaiah losing his job and maybe knocking his ego some.

and yet Isaiah escaped the wrath of David Stern...I hope they are looking closely at his involvment either in the NBA offices (possible), or Knicks management (doubtful).

I really liked Melo's game...but his antics (with or without Thomas's involvment) were just punk. I hope something happens over the course of the 15 game suspension, or immediately upon his return, that gives me hope that Carmelo doesn't want his career to be viewed through glasses tinted by this abomination.

mrjiggyfly2
12-19-2006, 05:55 AM
Carmelo really blew it with that suckerpunch. I don't know if he's a bad guy. But that certainly was a bad act. It's too bad as he's such a talented player. It looked like things would have died down if he didn't rekindle the fire.

I don't like Isiah. But I'm not sure how much he's to blame for this incident. George Karl is no saint as far as I can tell.

dryrunguy
12-19-2006, 08:28 AM
Personally, I think it's time to do away with the intentional foul, especially in a layup situation. It's stupid, but most importantly, it's incredibly dangerous. Had Carmelo broken his arm in his fall, the guy that fouled him would be the one getting the brunt of the heat--and for doing something that's NOT against NBA rules. And Carmelo would be widely viewed as a victim and a martyr.

Dry

Sebastien447
12-19-2006, 08:44 AM
For the majority of these guys, if they weren't playing ball they would NOT be heading to graduate school. They wouldn't have been in school in the first place. I'm amazed they're held in check as much as they are.

Sebastien447
12-20-2006, 02:43 PM
There's been a lot of talk about the latest brawl. Two points that I agree with ...

The NBA used to be much more physical, and fights more common. Media scrutiny turns it into something it's not.

Other pro sports leagues have more fighting, yet it isn't as big a deal. Is it because of the predominance of black athletes in the NBA? I think it very well could be.

Kirkus
12-20-2006, 02:47 PM
We need this kind of behaviour in tennis. Like someone hop over the net and clock Nalbanian right in the kisser. :P

Sebastien447
12-20-2006, 02:52 PM
We need this kind of behaviour in tennis. Like someone hop over the net and clock Nalbanian right in the kisser. :P

wonder what the penalty would be for that ... is it in the rulebook?

where's t4?

mmmm8
12-20-2006, 02:54 PM
We need this kind of behaviour in tennis. Like someone hop over the net and clock Nalbanian right in the kisser. :P

wonder what the penalty would be for that ... is it in the rulebook?

where's t4?



It's probably at the discretion of the ump anyway, and, hey, what ump wouldn't want to see that

Ti-Amie
12-20-2006, 05:44 PM
We need this kind of behaviour in tennis. Like someone hop over the net and clock Nalbanian right in the kisser. :P

[smiley=hyst.gif]

Didn't Isiah play with Detroit when they were known as the bad boys? I mean Laimbeer, Thomas, Rodman, they'd stomp you during a time out and then look around like "what?" I know someone who knows Isiah and she can't stand him. She woud never say why though...

Moose
12-20-2006, 06:27 PM
We need this kind of behaviour in tennis. Like someone hop over the net and clock Nalbanian right in the kisser. :P

[smiley=hyst.gif]

Didn't Isiah play with Detroit when they were known as the bad boys? I mean Laimbeer, Thomas, Rodman, they'd stomp you during a time out and then look around like "what?" I know someone who knows Isiah and she can't stand him. She woud never say why though...

Yes, Ti...Isaiah was part of that Detroit team.
I wonder if your friend knows the same Isaiah that was accued of sexual harassment earlier this year....maybe thats why she can't stand him

http://www.hoopsbuzz.com/2006/01/the_new_york_da.html

Ti-Amie
12-20-2006, 06:37 PM
We need this kind of behaviour in tennis. Like someone hop over the net and clock Nalbanian right in the kisser. :P

[smiley=hyst.gif]

Didn't Isiah play with Detroit when they were known as the bad boys? I mean Laimbeer, Thomas, Rodman, they'd stomp you during a time out and then look around like "what?" I know someone who knows Isiah and she can't stand him. She woud never say why though...

Yes, Ti...Isaiah was part of that Detroit team.
I wonder if your friend knows the same Isaiah that was accued of sexual harassment earlier this year....maybe thats why she can't stand him

http://www.hoopsbuzz.com/2006/01/the_new_york_da.html

You could be right Moose.